Sorcery & Swing Comes to Melbourne 7 October


Sorcery and Swing comes to Melbourne, Friday 7 October. Book Now!

Join us for this Unique Roaring Twenties music and magic Dinner Show.

Bookings & Enquiries: https://www.kelvinclub.com/whats-on or (03) 9654 5711

6.30pm ARRIVAL for 7.00pm START at the Kelvin Club, Melbourne Place, Melbourne

FEATURING MAGIC and MUSIC – SORCERY and SWING
Vaudeville brought back to life as you dine in style in the sophisticated Kelvin Club

In singer, Greg Poppleton’s 1920s band, Melbourne’s finest trad musicians…

Ian Smith – sousaphone and cornet
Jason Downes – saxophone and clarinet
Peter Baylor – guitar

The Kelvin Club will be transforming into a “Roaring Twenties” speakeasy for this not-to-be-missed event!

“Moonshine” and canapés served on arrival – together with intimate close-up miracles from The Gentleman Magician.

◆ THE SORCERY… The engaging magic of Bruce Glen, The Gentleman Magician

◆ THE SWING… The superb 1920s-1930s music of Greg Poppleton and his band

ENJOY DINNER AND DANCING ACCOMPANIED BY THE MUSIC OF “TIN PAN ALLEY” – FEATURING…

Greg Poppleton – Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s singer
Ian Smith – sousaphone and cornet
Peter Baylor – guitar
Jason Downes – clarinet and alto saxophone

  • Hear the captivating crooning of Greg Poppleton and his band
  • Unique storytelling magic by Bruce Glen, The Gentleman Magician
  • Fabulous 2-course dinner
  • Authentic speakeasy
  • A glass of authentic sparkling wine ‘Moonshine’ and canapes on arrival

The Great Gatsby never had it so good!

Greg Poppleton 1920s singer and The Gentleman Magician Bruce Glen - Sorcery & Magic Show
Greg Poppleton 1920s singer and The Gentleman Magician Bruce Glen – Sorcery & Magic Show

Venue: Kelvin Club, Melbourne Place, Melbourne 3000
Time: 6.30pm arrival for 7.00 pm start
Dress Code: 1920s Guys in ties, Girls in pearls
Single Tickets: $95 per person + booking fee
Inclusive of sparkling wine “moonshine” and canapés on arrival, 2-course dinner, entertainment, GST

Bookings & Enquiries: https://www.kelvinclub.com/whats-on or (03) 9654 5711

BRUCE GLEN BIO

Bruce Glen’s Magical Soirées are best described as ‘storytelling magic shows for adults – but not necessarily grown-ups’. They feature cutting-edge magic that seemingly defies the laws of physics – set amid intriguing stories that are guaranteed to leave you wondering. Bruce’s unique performance style has seen him invited to the famed Edinburgh Fringe; Adelaide Fringe and Fringe World Perth.

In 2015, he presented his ‘Imaginary Magic’ show in Sydney (ten sold-out shows) as part of the SMH Spectrum Now Festival. In addition, at sold-out Edinburgh International Magic Festival shows and at the famous London headquarters of The Magic Circle, Bruce left audiences gasping in disbelief – and also wondering if he had actually read their minds!

GREG POPPLETON BIO

Greg Poppleton is Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s singer with band. Recent performance highlights: 2020 Sydney Festival, resident band Great Art Deco Ball, resident 1920s band Gin Mill Social.

Greg Poppleton brings the era to life with a dazzling Hollywood experience. Think vintage glamour, prohibition and speakeasies. He also appears in the movies Moulin Rouge! and Chronicles of Narnia Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Book Today! Next Sorcery & Swing Dinner Show – Sat 10 September


Sorcery and Swing September 10! Join us for a Unique Roaring Twenties Dinner Show.

6.30pm ARRIVAL for 7.00pm START in the 1920s Cellos Room, Castlereagh Boutique Hotel, 169 Castlereagh St Sydney.

FEATURING MAGIC and MUSIC – SORCERY and SWING
Vaudeville brought back to life as you dine in style in the glamorous surrounds of Cellos Grand Dining Room.

Cellos, an original 1920s dining room, will return to its heyday, transforming into a “Roaring Twenties” speakeasy for this not-to-be-missed event!

“Moonshine” and canapés served on arrival – together with intimate close-up miracles from The Gentleman Magician.

◆ THE SORCERY… The engaging magic of Bruce Glen, The Gentleman Magician

◆ THE SWING… The superb 1920s-1930s music of Greg Poppleton and his band

ENJOY DINNER AND DANCING ACCOMPANIED BY THE MUSIC OF “TIN PAN ALLEY” – FEATURING…

Greg Poppleton – Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s singer
Geoff Power (ARIA nominee) – sousaphone and trumpet
Grahame Conlon (as seen on TV) – guitar and banjo
Damon Poppleton (youngest James Morrison Scholarship winner) – alto saxophone

  • Hear the captivating crooning of Greg Poppleton and his band
  • Unique storytelling magic by Bruce Glen, The Gentleman Magician
  • Fabulous 3-course dinner
  • Authentic speakeasy
  • A glass of authentic sparkling wine ‘Moonshine’ and canapes on arrival

The Great Gatsby never had it so good!

Greg Poppleton 1920s singer and The Gentleman Magician Bruce Glen - Sorcery & Magic Show
Greg Poppleton 1920s singer and The Gentleman Magician Bruce Glen – Sorcery & Magic Show

Venue: Cellos Grand Dining Room, Castlereagh Boutique Hotel, 169 Castlereagh St City
Time: 6.30pm arrival for 7.00 pm start
Dress Code: 1920s Guys in ties, Girls in pearls
Single Tickets: $150.00 per person + booking fee
Inclusive of sparkling wine “moonshine” and canapés on arrival, 3-course dinner, entertainment, GST and Members’ Discount.
Table of 8: $1100.00 + booking fee
Inclusive of 8 single tickets + as above and 2 complimentary bottles of Silverleaf Sparkling Wine

Bookings & Enquiries: 02 9284 1006 | https://www.thecastlereagh.com.au/events/unique-roaring-twenties-dinner-show/

WE’RE MAKING AN IMPACT – *We have chosen Humanitix as our ticketing partner, contributing to creating a positive impact on the world. Humanitix is making a difference by reinvesting 100% of profits back into helping the world’s most disadvantaged children.

BRUCE GLEN BIO

Bruce Glen’s Magical Soirées are best described as ‘storytelling magic shows for adults – but not necessarily grown-ups’. They feature cutting-edge magic that seemingly defies the laws of physics – set amid intriguing stories that are guaranteed to leave you wondering. Bruce’s unique performance style has seen him invited to the famed Edinburgh Fringe; Adelaide Fringe and Fringe World Perth.

In 2015, he presented his ‘Imaginary Magic’ show in Sydney (ten sold-out shows) as part of the SMH Spectrum Now Festival. In addition, at sold-out Edinburgh International Magic Festival shows and at the famous London headquarters of The Magic Circle, Bruce left audiences gasping in disbelief – and also wondering if he had actually read their minds!

GREG POPPLETON BIO

Greg Poppleton is Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s singer with band. Recent performance highlights: 2020 Sydney Festival, resident band Great Art Deco Ball, resident 1920s band Gin Mill Social.

Greg Poppleton brings the era to life with a dazzling Hollywood experience. Think vintage glamour, prohibition and speakeasies. He also appears in the movies Moulin Rouge! and Chronicles of Narnia Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

The Rivoli Show Photos – Oberon 9-10 April 2022


The Rivoli Show is a music and dance spectacle created by the Dance Makers Collective. The Greg Poppleton Trio (Greg Poppleton 1920s vocals, Grahame Conlon guitar and banjo, Cazzbo Johns sousaphone) introduces the hour show. The Rivoli Show was a sold-out hit of the 2020 Sydney Festival.

It played at the beautifully restored Art Deco Malachi Gilmore Hall in Oberon on Saturday night 9 April and a Sunday matinee on 10 April. Here are some photos…

Greg Poppleton 1920s singer at The Rivoli
Greg Poppleton, Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s singer at The Rivoli show in front of his vintage microphone.

THE RIVOLI SHOW

A celebration of social life before social media, when to meet was to talk, laugh and move to music together.

The Rivoli is an immersive dance hall meets dance theatre performance, The Rivoli is a tribute to the iconic dance halls across Australia that were a celebration of social life before social media.

Getting photo taken as audience takes to dance floor The Rivoli
Dancemakers’ Collective dancer, Katina Olsen, taking a band photo as the audience take to the dance floor at The Rivoli

A hit at Sydney Festival 2020, this joyous production will celebrate the launch of the iconic Malachi Gilmore Hall in Oberon… after four decades of waiting for dancers to return to the dance floor.

The Rivoli features some of Australia’s best dancers and a stellar live band, The Greg Poppleton Trio. It is Dance Makers Collective’s most ambitious work yet, The Rivoli, an ode to a bygone dance era.

“a thoroughly entertaining and surprising work.”
“…energetic, lively and moving.”
Callum McLean

Cazzbo Johns Greg Poppleton Trio
Cazzbo Johns on sousaphone with Greg Poppleton’s 1920s-30s Trio

Grahame Conlon banjo in Greg Poppleton 1920s-30s Trio
Grahame Conlon, banjo, in Greg Poppleton 1920s-30s Trio

DANCE MAKERS COLLECTIVE

DMC emerged in 2012 when a group of ten driven independent dance makers in Sydney gathered to take charge by working together to create new work in an environment where local opportunities to do so were slim. Over a few pizzas and some wine, each of us pitched ideas for short works to each other, and conceived of a program called Big Dance in Small Chunks – ten artists, ten works, ten minutes each. This informal get-together was where DMC was born.

After that meeting, we met with our now long-time partner and friend FORM Dance Projects in Parramatta and asked them to present our work in their 2013 program, which they took on with great enthusiasm. We asked our now long-time friends Legs On The Wall, Bangarra and Sydney Dance Company if we could use their rehearsal spaces to develop the work, successfully undertook a TRIP Residency at Tasdance, ran a crowdfunding campaign and approached a small arts charity Ars Musica Australis for some financial support. We applied for funding to (then) Arts NSW and secured enough funding to start developing the work, which came as a welcome shock to us as a brand new collective of artists, many of us in our first year of practice. We applied in two successive rounds to the Australia Council, unsuccessful both times, but we pushed on anyway and presented the program of works by rehearsing part-time to develop it, and underpaying ourselves.

When Big Dance in Small Chunks premiered in 2013 at Riverside Theatres, it was triumphant. The season was the most highly attended dance show in FORM’s program that year and was awarded Most Significant Dance Event of 2013 in Dance Australia Magazine’s annual critics’ awards. Jill Sykes wrote of the show in the Sydney Morning Herald at the time:

“The first showing by the Dance Makers Collective has imagination, thoughtfulness, individuality, performing ability and commitment. Even a sense of humour. It is a promising start by a group of independent artists in NSW, and worth catching in what will hopefully be a beginning rather than a one-off.”

And it was just the beginning.

Following the success of Big Dance in Small Chunks, DMC secured funding and mentorship support through the Australia Council’s (now defunct) JUMP Mentorship program. This enabled us to launch our second project WEBISODES, a series of short dance films created by each of the ten members, our first foray into dance on film which has been viewed by more than 10,000 people since being published online in 2014. In that same year, we supported three of the ten works presented in Big Dance in Small Chunks to be pushed further into longer works, curated in a Triple Bill again presented by FORM Dance Projects at Riverside Theatres, this time in 2015.

In these works, we started working more collaboratively together than we had before. Up until this point, we supported each other by working for one another as performers, providing feedback to each other, but essentially each of us were individual makers with ideas for works we wanted to make, to steer alone, but with some help from our peers. Our working methodology began to evolve from this relatively common way of making to a much richer, collaborative making process, which shifted even further in our next show.

DADS, which premiered in 2016, was a turning point for us and our most ambitious project to date. In DADS, DMC co-choreographed one full-length show, where each member shared equal responsibility for the show’s development. The show was also our first foray into community-engaged practice, where we took up residence at Dance Integrated Australia in the Northern Rivers region of NSW and worked with a local men’s group the Dustyesky Russian Men’s Choir, interviewing them about their dance experiences and recording their rehearsal in the pub in Mullumbimby, which formed the soundtrack for our opening sequence. We collaborated with our fathers, asking them for their advice about the show, they built our set, gave us dance moves, curated the show’s music and provided interview content that threaded together the narrative arc of the work; oh, and they danced with us in the show too!

DADS was shortlisted for the Australian Dance Award for Outstanding Achievement in Independent Dance in 2017.

After the success of DADS, and proven successes before that with our other three projects, DMC decided to take the next step and transition to a more independent company. Until this point, we relied heavily on our partners because DMC was an unincorporated entity, a group of individual artists with a name to work under, but no formal legal structure. We were, and still are, committed to a democratic model of working where members share not only in the creative process in the studio and on stage, but in the strategic direction of the company. To maintain autonomy over this as a group of artists, DMC formed a partnership of its now 9 members; this enabled us to apply for our own funding and manage our own projects without relying on other incorporated bodies.

As a partnership, DMC secured two successive rounds of strategic funding through Create NSW, a project grant through Create NSW, and a project and career development grant through the Australia Council. The strategic funding rounds we secured, Making Spaces and Emerging Organisations, enabled us to form new partnerships with local councils and Western Sydney based arts companies and local government arts centres including PYT Fairfield, Urban Theatre Projects, Blacktown Arts and Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre.

With this strategic funding DMC piloted new programs that launched in 2019, these were:

1. Mobilise (dancer training intensive);

2. Future Makers (youth dance company);

3. Thrive (schools incursions) and;

4. Dance On (dance classes for seniors)

At the same time, DMC seeded a range of new short works with our Making Spaces funding, which allowed us to work in community centres across Western Sydney by giving each member in DMC residency time of 4 weeks across an 18 month period from 2018-2019. Several of these seeded works have had presentation outcomes, these include:

1. Marnie and Melanie Palomares’ work The Space Between, a site-specific duet performed at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra as part of the BOLD Festival and at Articulate Project Space in Leichhardt as part of de Quincey co’s PLATFORM 2019;

2. Carl Sciberras’ work with collaborator’s Todd Fuller (visual/projection artist) and Mitchell Mollison (composer) Figure Out, a live drawing, live sound, live dance performance installation for children performed at the WOW Festival at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre;

3. Rosslyn Wythes’ Converge/\Diverge, a series of collaborative projects with ceramicist Holly Macdonald which have been presented in Brussels;

4. And Rosslyn Wythes’ Eco 1000, a site-specific solo about the Bathurst 1000 performed as part of ArtState 2018

Making Spaces also seeded a new duet between DMC members Katina Olsen (Wakka Wakka and Kombumerri woman) and Anya McKee called Women’s Business, which will undergo further and final development in 2020 for presentation in 2021.

Whilst piloting these programs, and developing and presenting these short works, DMC also developed The Rivoli, which was an even more ambitious community-engaged project than DADS which had a sold-out premiere season at Sydney Festival in January 2020. With funding from Create NSW, Cumberland Council, City of Parramatta, the Australia Council and Sydney Festival, this large-scale site-specific work brought together members of the local community, DMC’s new youth company Future Makers, a live swing band and 8 DMC performers at Granville Town Hall.

Given the breadth and scope of our program and projects, DMC became an incorporated association in 2019 and established a volunteer board consisting of members of the company and skilled professionals working outside DMC.

Once establishing ourselves as a company, DMC successfully secured for the first time Annual Program Funding through Create NSW. This funding enables us to continue our programs in 2020 as resident company at PYT Fairfield. The General Manager and Engagement Officer, DMC members Carl Sciberras and Melanie Palomares, work side-by-side with the remaining collective members to design and create opportunities for artists and the public to engage in rich dance experiences. This flat organisational structure enables us to lead together and adapt the program based on the emergence of ideas from within the company, and in response to opportunities that arise externally that align with our values, aims and objectives.

DMC is an exceptionally nimble creative enterprise that provides opportunities for artists in Sydney to create work together, and for a range of other demographic groups to engage in dance in various ways. We are a leader in our area of practice and exist as a beacon for others not only in dance, but in the arts more broadly, seeking to change the status-quo and embrace new ways of operating.

ABOUT THE MALACHI

The recently restored Art Deco Malachi Gilmore Memorial Hall occupies a prominent position in the main street of Oberon. Its asymmetrical façade is a striking Inter-war Art Deco addition to the streetscape of Oberon Street and the town generally.

Facade Malachi Hall Oberon
Facade, Art Deco Malachi Gilmore Hall, Oberon NSW

On its opening in 1937, The Sydney Morning Herald wrote,

“The Malachi Gilmore Memorial Hall recently completed at Oberon has for its architectural basis the famous Pharos pylon of Alexandria. This historical pylon had a height of 460 feet. It was built by Sostratus of Cynidus. The architects of the Oberon Hall conceived the idea of making it a minor replica of the Pharos pylon. This design was accepted by the parish priest (Dr. A.J. Gummers) and the representatives of the late Malachi Gilmore, who was a native of Ireland. This was a startlingly bold design, but now that the hall has been completed it is a really beautiful building without being in the least incongruous. It is one of the architectural landmarks not merely of the town, but also of the whole district between the Blue Mountains and Lithgow. Tourists admire the bold outlines of the new building.

Alternative facade view Malachi Gilmore Hall Oberon
Alternative facade view, Malachi Gilmore Hall, Oberon NSW

Many, ignorant of the antiquity of the design (the Pharos tower was supposed to have been erected 283BC, and was favourably commented on by Pliny and Strabo, ancient historians), regard it as ultra modern in conception. An old hall adjoining emphasises the bold outlines of the new building. A striking feature of the front of the new building is the use of glass bricks supplied by the Australian Glass Company, Sydney. The remainder of the building is stoutly built in brick and concrete. The hall measures 110 feet by 40 feet. It is used mainly for Roman Catholic social functions. . . Mr H. A. Taylor, Sydney, was the builder of the hall.”

The façade is rendered concrete with a complex massing of curving and rectangular shapes presenting a stepped skyline to the street. The emphasis is generally horizontal except for a central portion with a vertical pier rising to a height of nearly 14 metres. The metal-framed windows create a grid-like pattern and are stepped in size and proportion to match the stepped façade. Glass bricks form a large curved wall. The building’s name is rendered in stylized lettering on the façade.

The interior of the façade section of the building is largely intact and contains a foyer with fireplace, gallery, cloak rooms, bio-box and rewinding rooms at the front. In the main hall the walls are decorated with plasterwork, with some original Morene Art stucco work. The flooring of the foyer and main hall is West Australian jarrah hardwood. Under the main hall is another floor with slab concrete flooring supporting “supper rooms” and opening at ground level onto the large parking area at the rear of the property. The foyer is approximately 65 square metres (700 sq ft) and the hall has 279 square metres (3000 sq ft) of dancing space. Curiously, the hall was built in reverse of the architect’s plans.

Foyer Malachi-Gilmore Hall Oberon
Foyer, Malachi-Gilmore Hall, Oberon NSW

Some major, although not structural changes were made during the 1980s, disconnecting the façade from the main hall section of the building. A stud wall now blocks the view that was formerly available from an upstairs viewing area onto the main hall (this vewing area has been converted in part to an office and in part left as open space). Similarly a stud wall blocks the view that was formerly available from the mezzanine level projection room into the main hall. At the time of renovation two new bathrooms were built in the façade section. A section of the stage in the main hall section was also cut out to make room for an elevator to convey goods from the rear parking area.

Glass Wall Malachi Gilmore Hall
Glass brick wall Malachi Gilmore Hall, Oberon NSW

Thorne, Tod and Cork point out that one of the building’s eccentricities is that “the auditorium does not match the façade in any way. The former is a rather plain country hall with a stage, proscenium, stalls and small gallery” (1996, 302). According to Scott Robinson of the NSW Art Deco Society, “The Malachi Gilmore Hall is a most unusual combination of a diminiative (sic) Modern “picture palace” front (with its vertical fin and roof) and Modern Movement rectiliniarity of the stepped massing of the building behind the front” (quoted in the Heritage Inventory nomination form submitted by the Friends of the Malachi Gilmore Hall, 2001). Ross Thorne’s 1983 “Theatres/Cinemas in NSW” states that the exterior of the hall is “unique in a kind of west-coast USA 1930s design style with a vague Frank Lloyd Wright influence produced by the feeling of horizontality (in parts). It also has a very strong vertical element at the front, and glass bricks in the manner of Depression Modern”. Thorne, Tod and Cork’s “Movie Theatre Heritage Register” states, “there is nothing quite like it elsewhere in New South Wales. Even by today’s standards, the building is unusual and futuristic” (1996, 302).

Cinemo projector from the days when the hall was also Oberon's picture theatre
Cinema projector from the days when the Malchi Gilmore Hall was also Oberon’s picture theatre

The architectural significance of the hall has been widely recognised and is reflected in the large number of heritage listings: Oberon Shire Council LEP, RAIA Register of Twentieth Century Buildings, the Register of the National Trust of Australia (NSW), the Register of the Art Deco Society, and Ross Thorne’s Movie Theatre Heritage Register.

Malachi Gilmore Hall
Sketch of hall in the Malachi Gilmore Hall foyer

TICKETS

Book now for Greg Poppleton’s newest show, SORCERY & SWING with Bruce Glen, The Gentleman Magician.

Saturday 21 May 2022, in the ornate 1920s Cellos of the Castlereagh Boutique Hotel, 169 Castlereagh St, Sydney, 6:30-10pm.

Canapes, three course dinner, beverage package, close-up magic and illusions, 1920s quartet and dance floor!

Dine NSW vouchers welcome. Book now. The last show sold out.

Dress code: guys in ties, girls in pearls.

Photos – Great Art Deco Ball 2022 – Greg Poppleton Band


The Great Art Deco Ball. Greg Poppleton returned by popular demand to the highlight of the Blue Mountains 1920s Festival – the Great Art Deco Ball – celebrating 12 years in 2022 at the wedding cake-like, Carrington Hotel in Katoomba.

Greg Poppleton 1920s-style singer and dancers…

Greg Poppleton 1920s Singer Great art Deco Ball

The Blue Mountains, just west of Sydney, is largely a national park with a string of towns through its centre along the western highway from Sydney known for their beauty and arts. Katoomba is the largest of these towns.

This year, because of Covid, the Carrington Hotel’s famous Great Art Deco Ball was moved from its traditional February date to Saturday 2nd April.

It was a dazzling Hollywood entertainment experience ‘1920’s style’ of dining and dancing. Stepping out in the fashion of a bygone era in the Grand Dining Room of the historic Carrington Hotel, Katoomba.

Full dance floor at the 2022 Great Art Deco Ball…

Dancers Greg Poppleton 1920s Band

Greg Poppleton, Australia’s only authentic 1920s – 1930s singer, brought the ‘twenties’ to life adding a little vintage glamour to the night!

Step out in the fashion of a bygone era and dance the night away, enjoy a sumptuous 3-course dinner, with prizes for best dressed.

In Greg’s band: Geoff Power cornet and sousaphone, Grahame Conlon banjo and guitar, and Richelle Booth clarinet and bass saxophone.

Richelle Booth on the bass sax…

Richelle Booth Greg Poppleton 1920s Band

CARRINGTON HOTEL

The Carrington Hotel is a heritage-listed former spa, hotel and power station and now hotel and public bar located at Katoomba Street, Katoomba in the City of Blue Mountains local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by John Kirkpatrick and Bosser in 1882; and by Edward H. Hogben with Goyder Brothers in 1911-13; and built from 1882 to 1913 by F. Drewett in 1882; and by Howie, Brown and Moffit in 1912-13. It is also known as Great Western Hotel. The property is privately owned. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Geoff Power on the mighty sousaphone…

Geoff Power sousaphone Greg Poppleton Band

The Carrington is the only 19th century grand resort hotel still in use in New South Wales. It also retains much of the fabric of its major phases of development and continues to occupy the commanding position in Katoomba that it has done since its construction. It was built in 1883 by Harry George Rowell, a large hotel owner from Sydney, and was owned by a series of prominent families over the next century. Today it is still operating as a high class hotel providing accommodation and restaurant services.

Grahame Conlon on banjo and guitar…

Grahame Conlon Greg Poppleton 1920s Band

THE GRAND DINING ROM

From 1885 Carrington began to make additions to the premises including an additional wing, dining hall, two drawing rooms and a music room, resulting in 119 bedrooms and seven suites of rooms, two tennis courts and flower and vegetable gardens.. He told a newspaper reporter in 1890 of the improvements he had made. The article read,

“Among the additions and improvements to the building are the following — a wing built (in 1886) of cut stone, and having a southerly aspect, consisting of 20 single rooms, and called ‘the bachelors’ wing.’ Early in 1888 Mr. Goyder, having taken advantage of his right, purchased the hotel, and, finding the accommodation insufficient, added 50 more rooms. This addition stands in the courtyard and is joined to the main building. It is higher than the remaining portions of the hotel and adds to the imposing appearance of the pile. A music-room has also been added to the drawing room, and is separated from it by large folding doors. The floor of the music room is of polished tallow-wood, and is partly covered with Austrian rugs, which are easily removed for dancing. The piano is a Brinsmead, and is considered one of the finest grands; its tone is full and soft. The dining hall is also new; it measures 60ft, by 40ft. The floor is carpeted, and everything conducive to comfort is present. The ceiling is lofty, the lighting good, and the table decorations and menu leave nothing to be desired. This hall is capable of seating 200 guests. There are now 135 rooms in the hotel, among which are seven suites of private apartments, most comfortably furnished and conveniently situated, including one of the prettiest bridal suites to be found in the colonies.”

Geoff Power soloing on trumpet…

Geoff Power Trumpet Greg Poppleton 1920s Band

The book Greg Poppleton’s 1920s-30s music for your event, email Tony Jex at OzManagement tony@ozmanagement.com

Zelda, Magazine of the Vintage Nouveau. 2022 Annual.


Zelda, Magazine of the Vintage Nouveau, is a glossy annual published by the multi-talented US actor, cinematographer and stills photographer, Don Spiro.

If you’re a fan of what matters in Nouveau Vintage in the USA, then this magazine is for you. Even the ads for newly tailored vintage suits and cravats are a great resource for those of us worldwide who look sharp.

zelda cover greg poppleton 1920s jazz

In this, the latest 2022 edition, the Zelda annual invites you to “enjoy a vintage cocktail, and listen to some old jazz while you page through the articles in this issue…”

WHAT’S IN THIS YEAR’S ZELDA

“We start with researcher and historian Garret Richard’s take on Trader Vic’s tropical tequila classic cocktail, El Diablo, followed by Eff’s Style Emporium’s review of the allure of that vintage summer fabric, Palm Beach Cloth.

We have interviews with Jazz-Age-style singer Greg Poppleton and New York burlesque star Dandy Dillinger.

We’ll catch up on the undertakings of Philadelphia bandleader, Drew Nugent and we’ll learn about the history of the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum.”

zelda open pages greg poppleton 1920s singer

“We’ll learn from Queen Esther how influential accomplishments people of color have gone unacknowledged, and Mr. Burton will enlighten us about appreciating vintage style without vintage values.

We’ll introduce you to the sites of jazz age arts and culture in Atlanta, Georgia, and our Recipe Box feature about the U. S. Department Of Agriculture’s Circular 109 from 1918, “Cottage Cheese Dishes,” appropriately shows how to enjoy tasty recipes in hard times, and with social activities returning, we are thrilled to showcase various Jazz Age and Prohibition-era events that our readers have attended in On The Town.”

It’s an honour to be published in this year’s Zelda.

Get your copy of this sumptuous glossy now for only $US7.50 here

zelda open pages greg poppleton 1920s jazz singer

Get your copy of this sumptuous glossy now for only $US7.50 here

Rosemary Clooney Chain Smoking Singer – Phantom Dancer 1 March 2022


Rosemary Clooney was an American singer, actor and radio host. She’s this week’s Phantom Dancer feature artist where you’ll hear her in radio broadcasts from the 1950s-60s. She’s also actor, George Clooney’s, aunt.

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV hosted by me, Greg Poppleton. Hear past Phantom Dancer online now at https://2ser.com/phantom-dancer/.

This show will be online after 2pm AEST, Tuesday 1 March at https://2ser.com/phantom-dancer/.

ROSEMARY CLOONEY

It’s incredible that she had the beautiful voice that she had despite the heavy smoking that eventually made the end of her life painful before killing her.

From ‘More Than a Girl Singer’, American Association for Cancer Research,

“A long-time smoker, Clooney was hospitalized in 1996 with acute respiratory failure. At that time, her doctors advised her to quit smoking, but Clooney struggled with her addiction. “Mama called me from the hospital and asked me to bring her cigarettes,” Ferrer (one of her sons)  remembers. “It was so hard for her to stop, though she finally did.”

Toward the end of 2001, Clooney was on the road performing when she began to find it hard to breathe. By the time she arrived home in Beverly Hills a few days before Christmas, she was exhausted. “She could hardly get up the stairs,” says Ferrer. “After two steps, she would have to stop and rest.” Less than a month later, Clooney was diagnosed with stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer. She died six months later, on June 29, 2002, at her home in Beverly Hills with her family beside her. She was 74.”

TALENT SPOTTED

In 1945, Rosemary Clooney’s father went out one night with friends to celebrate the end of World War II. He never came back.

Clooney, 17, and her sister, 14, found themselves in a dire situation. They collected soft drink bottles and used what little money they had to buy lunch at school. The rent was overdue, the phone disconnected and the utilities about to be turned off when their luck changed. The teenagers, who had grown up performing at political rallies for their grandfather, the mayor of Maysville, won a singing competition at WLW Cincinnati, a local radio station. The station hired them for a regular late-night spot, with each sister earning $20 a week (almost US$290 in 2021 money).

They sing with Tony Pastor’s Orchestra, broadcasting and recording with the band until 1949 (as you’ll hear on this week’s Phantom Dancer mix).

In 1950–51, she was a regular on the radio and television versions of Songs For Sale on CBS. In 1951, her record of “Come On-a My House”, produced by Mitch Miller, became a hit. It was her first of many singles to hit the charts—despite the fact that Clooney hated the song passionately. She recorded several duets with Marlene Dietrich and appeared in the early 1950s on Faye Emerson’s Wonderful Town series on CBS. Clooney also did several guest appearances on the Arthur Godfrey radio show.

HOLLYWOOD

In 1954, she starred with Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye and Vera-Ellen in the movie White Christmas…

Two years later she had her own half-hour syndicated television musical-variety show, The Rosemary Clooney Show. NBC re-launched the show in a prime time slot on 1957 as The Lux Show Starring Rosemary Clooney. It lasted one season. In the late 50s and early 1960s, Clooney often appeared with Bing Crosby on television and radio. You’ll hear an excerpt from a 20-minute CBS radio program they did Monday to Friday for years that aired before the midday news.

Clooney left Columbia Records in 1958, doing a number of recordings for MGM Records and then some for Coral Records. Finally, toward the end of 1958, she signed with RCA Victor Records, where she stayed until 1963. In 1964, she went to Reprise Records, and in 1965 to Dot Records.

1970s – 2000s

After a hiatus of 11 years due to pills, alcohol and depression, Clooney signed to United Artists Records in 1976 for two albums. From 1977, she recorded an album every year for the Concord Jazz record label until her death. She was also singing on other people’s albums in 70s and 80s

In 1995, Clooney guest-starred in the NBC television medical drama ER (starring her nephew, George Clooney); for her performance, she received a Primetime Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series.

She received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002.

Here’s Rosemary Clooney on ‘What’s My Line’,

1 MARCH PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney
LISTEN ONLINE
Community Radio Network Show CRN #534

107.3 2SER Tuesday 1 March 2022
12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT) and Saturdays 5 – 5:55pm
National Program
5GTR Mt Gambier Monday 2:30 – 3:30am
3MBR Murrayville Monday 3 – 4am
4NAG Keppel FM Monday 3 – 4am
2MIA Griffith Monday 3 – 4am
2BAR Edge FM Bega Monday 3 – 4am
2BRW Braidwood Monday 3 – 4am
2YYY Young Monday 3 – 4am
3VKV Alpine Radio Monday 6 – 7pm
7MID Oatlands Monday 6 -7pm
6GME Radio Goolarri Broome Tuesday 12am – 1am
2SEA Eden Tuesday 6 – 7pm
2MCE Bathurst Wednesday 9 – 10am
1ART ArtsoundFM Canberra Friday 10 – 11am
2ARM Armidale Friday 12 – 1pm
5LCM Lofty FM Adelaide Friday 1 – 2pm
Denmark FM (West Australia) Saturdays 10 – 11am
Repeat: Wednesdays 10 – 11pm
7LTN Launceston Sunday 5 – 6am
3MGB Mallacoota Sunday 5 – 6am
3BBR West Gippsland Sunday 5 – 6pm

Set 1
A Date With The Duke
Take The A-Train (theme) + Can’t You Read Between The Lines?
Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘A Date With The Duke’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
Back Home Again in Indiana
Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘A Date With The Duke’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
The Wish I Wish
Duke Ellington Orchestra (voc) Joya Sherill
‘A Date With The Duke’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
Cottontail
Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘A Date With The Duke’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
Set 2
1950s Jazz Radio
Sugar Beat
Eliot Lawrence Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WOR Mutual NY
1951
At Sundown
Les Brown Orchestra
‘Treasury Bandstand’
Hershey Park Ballroom
WLAN ABC Lancaster PA
1957
Give Me The Simple Life
Thelma Carpenter
‘Jazz Arts Concert’
WNBC NBC NY
4 Oct 1952
Set 3
Trad Jazz Radio
Bugle Call Rag
Red Nichols
Radio Transcription
1952
Open + South Rampart Street Parade
Preacher Rollo
‘Dixieland Club’
AFRS Re-broadcast
30 Apr 1952
Mama’s Gone, Goodbye + St Louis Blues
Kid Ory
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
5 Feb 1955
Set 4
Rosemany Clooney
‘S Wonderful
Rosemary & Betty Clooney (voc) Tony Pastor Orchestra
Aircheck
New York City
Sep 1948
Tenderly (theme) + You Make Me Feel So Young
Rosemary Clooney
‘The Rosemary Clooney Show’
KNX CBS LA
2 Nov 1954
Enchanted
Rosemary Clooney
‘Bing Crosby – Rosemary Clooney Show’
KNX CBS LA
20 Mar 1962
It’s a Most Unusual Day + Something to Remember You By
Rosemary Clooney and Bing Crosby
‘The Bing Crosby Show’
KNX CBS LA
22 Nov 1953
Set 5
1920s Comm Records
Sunday
Jean Goldkette Orchestra (voc) Keller Sisters
Comm Rec
Camden NJ
15 Oct 1926
Delirium
Red and Miff’s Stompers
Comm Rec
New York City
11 Feb 1927
Flamin’ Mamie
Coon-Sanders Nighthawks Orchestra (voc) Joe Sanders
Comm Rec
Camden NJ
21 Dec 1925
Blue Melody Blues
Tiny Praham and his Musicians
Comm Rec
Chicago
1 Feb 1929
Set 6
Henny Youngman
Love Thy Neighbour (film preview)
Henny Youngman, Jack Benny, Tommy Dorsey & more
Paramount Theatre
WOR Mutual NY
17 Dec 1940
Set 7
 Mid 1940s Swing Radio
Theme + Hamp’s Got a Duke
Lionel Hampton Orchestra
Casa Manana
Culver City Ca
KFI NBC LA
20 Jul 1947
Temptation
Harry James Orchestra (voc) Ginny Powell
Meadowbrook Gardens
KECA ABC LA
10 Feb 1946
Santa Catalina
Raymond Scott Orchestra (voc) Dorothy Collins
Palace Hotel
KQW CBS San Francisco
16 Sep 1947
Andy’s Blues
Count Basie Orchestra
Avadon Ballroom
Aircheck
Los Angeles
1946
Set 8
Women Radio Singers
Manhattan
Lee Wiley
‘Guest Star’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1950
Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen
Kay Starr (voc) Charlie Barnett Orchestra
‘For the Record’
WEAF NBC NY
11 Sep 1944
Robin Hood
Mildred Bailey
‘Music Till Midnight’
WABC CBS NY
12 Feb 1945
I Miss Your Kiss
Joya Sherill (voc) Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘A Date with the Duke’
WJZ ABC NY
12 May 1945

1920s 1930s Jazz Swing Songs by Greg Poppleton – New Album Mix


1920s 1930s Jazz Swing Songs by Greg Poppleton. Enjoy this 53 minute YouTube mix of 1920s – 1930s jazz swing songs. It’s mixed from six albums by Australian 1920s-30s singer, Greg Poppleton.

Greg’s newest album, ’20s 30s Tin Pan Alley Vol. 2′ , is now on
APPLE MUSIC
AMAZON
BANDCAMP
SPOTIFY

1920s-30s Greg Poppleton bookings and Sorcery and Swing Speakeasy Show bookings: visit https://www.gregpoppletonmusic.com/booking-enquiries/

Please visit Greg’s website – https://www.gregpoppletonmusic.com
@Greg Poppleton

1920s – 1930s SONG MIX:
0:00 Tip Toe Through the Tulips
3:48 The Charleston (correct tempo, dancers!)
6:17 Sweet Sue
8:33 Carolina in the Morning
12:13 It’s Only a Paper Moon
14:34 My Gal Sal
17:39 San Antonio Rose
19:47 St James Infirmary
22:47 Singing the Bathtub
24:50 Love Me or Leave Me
28:50 Walkin’ My Baby Back Home
32:27 Exactly Like You
34:39 On The Sunny Side Of The Street
39:54 If I Could Be With You (One Hour Tonight)
42:43 Ain’t She Sweet (Grahame Conlon ukulele)
45:15 Cakewalkin’ Babies From Home
47:46 St Louis Blues

1920s 1930s Jazz Swing Songs by Greg Poppleton Band:
Greg Poppleton: 1920s – 1930s singer
Paul Furniss: soprano, alto, tenor saxes and clarinet
Al Davey: trumpet and trombone
Bob Henderson: trumpet
Matt Baker: piano
Peter Locke: piano
Grahame Conlon: guitar and banjo
Geoff Power: sousaphone
Rod Herbert: sousaphone
Darcy Wright: double bass
Mark Harris: double bass
Dieter Vogt: double bass
Lawrie Thompson: drums and washboard
Joel Davis: drums

Join the Socials:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gregpoppleton/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gregpoppleto…

Greg Poppleton actor credits:
IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0973648/

Benny Goodman Goes Bop, Re-Learns Clarinet – Phantom Dancer 24 August 2021


Benny Goodman goes Bop from live 1948-49 radio is this week’s Phantom Dancer feature artist.

The Sydney Covid Lockdown worsens, so again, unfortunately, I must premier a Phantom Dancer classic. I’m itching to make new mixes and write new bios for you live in the studio soon.

The Phantom Dancer – your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV – is hosted by me, Greg Poppleton and heard online and over 20 radio stations.

Hear past Phantom Dancer online now at https://2ser.com/phantom-dancer/.

This show will be online after 2pm AEST, Tuesday 24 August at https://2ser.com/phantom-dancer/.


BENNY

By the late 1940s, as you’ll hear on today’s Phantom Dancer, Goodman had moved from swing to bop, gaining praise from jazz critics for his recordings.

Goodman had broken up his swing orchestra in 1947, although he continued to assemble big bands and small groups for touring and recording throughout the remainder of his career.

He halfheartedly embraced the bebop movement and in the late 1940s made several recordings with noted bop musicians. Although Goodman’s solos were firmly in the old school, the blend of the two styles was effective.



BOP

His orchestra and his small groups became bop oriented. He hired many from the bop second wave to create the right sound, including Buddy Greco (who also sang), Zoot Sims and Wardell Gray.

For bop clarinet, Goodman was much influenced by Swedish clarinetist Stan Hasselgard. For some arrangements and bebop advice, he went to pianist Mary Lou Williams.

Interestingly, during this time, Goodman changed his clarinet technique,
“In 1949, when he was 40, Goodman decided to study with Reginald Kell, one of the world’s leading classical clarinetists. To do so, he had to change his entire technique: instead of holding the mouthpiece between his front teeth and lower lip, as he had done since he first took a clarinet in hand 30 years earlier, Goodman learned to adjust his embouchure to the use of both lips and even to use new fingering techniques. He had his old finger calluses removed and started to learn how to play his clarinet again—almost from scratch.”

Initially, he enjoyed the humour in bop, saying about a Thelonius Monk piece, “I like it, I like that very much. I like the piece and I like the way he played it. I think he’s got a sense of humour and he’s got some good things there.”

But within eighteen months bop frustrated Goodman and he returned to swing. In fact, he had changed his mind so completely about bop that in 1953 he was quoted, “Maybe bop has done more to set music back for years than anything. Basically it’s all wrong. It’s not even knowing the scales. Bop was mostly publicity and people figuring angles.”

Read trumpeter Al Stewart’s first hand account of playing in Benny Goodman’s bop band

24 AUGUST PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney
LISTEN ONLINE

 

Community Radio Network Show CRN #507

107.3 2SER Tuesday 24 August 2021
12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT) and Saturdays 5 – 5:55pm
National Program
5GTR Mt Gambier Monday 2:30 – 3:30am
3MBR Murrayville Monday 3 – 4am
4NAG Keppel FM Monday 3 – 4am
2SEA Eden Monday 3 – 4am
2MIA Griffith Monday 3 – 4pm
2BAR Edge FM Bega Monday 3 – 4pm
3VKV Alpine Radio Monday 6 – 7pm
7MID Oatlands Tuesday 8 – 9pm
1ART ArtsoundFM Canberra Friday 10 – 11am
2ARM Armidale Friday 12 – 1pm
5LCM Lofty FM Adelaide Friday 1 – 2pm
4RPH Brisbane Sunday 3 – 4am
7LTN Launceston Sunday 5 – 6am
3MGB Mallacoota Sunday 5 – 6am
6GME Radio Goolarri Broome Sunday 5 – 6am
3BBR West Gippsland Sunday 5 – 6pm

Set 1
1940s Radio Big Bands  
Open + Memories of You (theme) + Begin the Beguine
Sonny Dunham Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
14 Apr 1944
That’s My Type
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Palladium Ballroom
Hollywood
AFRS Re-broadcast
21 Feb 1946
Candy Kid’s Note To A Classy Chassis + Close
Vaughn Monroe Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Commodore Hotel NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
8 Feb 1945
Set 2
Latin Music  
Open + Tico Tico
Lena Romay
‘Personal Album’
AFRS Hollywood
1945
Open + Amor Amor + Besume Mucho
Xavier Cugat (voc) Del Campo
‘One Night Stand’
Trocadero
Hollywood
AFRS Re-broadcast
18 Feb 1945
Cabando Canha + + The Moon is in My Heart + Close
Enric Madreguera and his Music of the Americas (voc) Eddie Gomez
‘One Night Stand’
Copacabana NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
1949
Set 3
Chamber Music Society  
Open + Carry Me Back To Old Virginny
Henry Levine
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue
21 Jul 1941
Blow The Man Down
Diane Courtney
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue
21 Jul 1941
Three Valve Jump
Erskine Hawkins
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue
21 Jul 1941
Clarinet in a Haunted House
Paul Lavalle Woodwinds
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue
21 Jul 1941
Set 4
Benny Goodman Bop Radio  
Undercurrent Blues
Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Palladium Ballroom
Hollywood
AFRS Re-broadcast
1949
Limehouse Blues
Benny Goodman Sextet
‘One Night Stand’
The Click
Philadelphia
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 Jun 1948
Blue Lou
Benny Goodman Sextet
‘One Night Stand’
Palladium Ballroom
Hollywood
AFRS Re-broadcast
1949
Body and Soul
Benny Goodman Trio
‘One Night Stand’
The Click
Philadelphia
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 Jun 1948
Set 5
Artie Shaw  
Nightmare (theme) + Rose Room
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Summer Terrace
Ritz Carlton Room
WNAC NBC Red
Boston
19 Sep 1939
The Lamp is Low
Artie Shaw Orchestra (voc) Helen Forrest
‘Melody and Madness’
WABC CBS NY
22 Aug 1939
Jungle Drums
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Blue Room
Hotel Lincoln
WEAF NBC Red NY
18 Jan 1939
St Louis Blues + Nightmare (theme)
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WEAF NBC Red NY
19 Oct 1939
Set 6
1930s Radio  
Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gave To Me
Kay Kyser and his Band from the Carolines (voc) Sully Mason and Band
Aircheck
12 Jun 1934
Here Comes Cookie
Henry Busse Orchestra (voc) Marion Holmes
Radio Transcription
1935
Thanks
Hal Kemp Orchestra (voc) Deane Janis
Radio Transcription
1934
Fine and Dandy
Anson Weeks Orchestra (voc) The Rhythmsters
Radio Transcription
1932
Set 7
1920s Radio  
What a Day!
Eskimo Pie Orchestra (voc) Kay Parker
‘The Eskimo Pie Program’
Jul 1929
The Man From the South
Ted Weems Orchestra (voc) Arthur Jarrett and Parker Gibbs
Comm Rec
Chicago
2 Dec 1929
1927 Radio Routine
Bing Crosby and Judy Garland
‘Bing Crosby Show’
KECA ABC LA
5 Oct 1947
Set 8
Women Singers on the Air  
The Starlit Hour
Ella Fitzgerald (voc) Ella Fitzgerald Orchestra
Savoy Ballroom
WEAF NBC Red NY
26 Feb 1940
Mean To Me
Sarah Vaughan (voc) Billy Eckstine Orchestra
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
Feb 1945
Mad About The Boy
Lena Horne (voc) Fletcher Henderson Orchestra
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
1944
No Love, No Nothin’
Dinah Washington (voc) Lionel Hampton Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Trianon Ballroom
Culver City Ca
AFRS Re-broadcast
16 Jun 1944

Rosemary Clooney Chain Smoking Singer – Phantom Dancer 27 July 2021


Rosemary Clooney was an American singer, actor and radio host. She’s this week’s Phantom Dancer feature artist where you’ll hear her in radio broadcasts from the 1950s-60s. She’s also actor, George Clooney’s, aunt. Because of the current Covid lockdown in Sydney, this is a repeat of the 2 Feb 2021 show. Enjoy!

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV hosted by me, Greg Poppleton. Hear past Phantom Dancer online now at https://2ser.com/phantom-dancer/.

This show will be online after 2pm AEST, Tuesday 27 July at https://2ser.com/phantom-dancer/.

ROSEMARY CLOONEY

It’s incredible that she had the beautiful voice that she had despite the heavy smoking that eventually made the end of her life painful before killing her.

From ‘More Than a Girl Singer’, American Association for Cancer Research,

“A long-time smoker, Clooney was hospitalized in 1996 with acute respiratory failure. At that time, her doctors advised her to quit smoking, but Clooney struggled with her addiction. “Mama called me from the hospital and asked me to bring her cigarettes,” Ferrer (one of her sons)  remembers. “It was so hard for her to stop, though she finally did.”

Toward the end of 2001, Clooney was on the road performing when she began to find it hard to breathe. By the time she arrived home in Beverly Hills a few days before Christmas, she was exhausted. “She could hardly get up the stairs,” says Ferrer. “After two steps, she would have to stop and rest.” Less than a month later, Clooney was diagnosed with stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer. She died six months later, on June 29, 2002, at her home in Beverly Hills with her family beside her. She was 74.”

TALENT SPOTTED

In 1945, Rosemary Clooney’s father went out one night with friends to celebrate the end of World War II. He never came back.

Clooney, 17, and her sister, 14, found themselves in a dire situation. They collected soft drink bottles and used what little money they had to buy lunch at school. The rent was overdue, the phone disconnected and the utilities about to be turned off when their luck changed. The teenagers, who had grown up performing at political rallies for their grandfather, the mayor of Maysville, won a singing competition at WLW Cincinnati, a local radio station. The station hired them for a regular late-night spot, with each sister earning $20 a week (almost US$290 in 2021 money).

They sing with Tony Pastor’s Orchestra, broadcasting and recording with the band until 1949 (as you’ll hear on this week’s Phantom Dancer mix).

In 1950–51, she was a regular on the radio and television versions of Songs For Sale on CBS. In 1951, her record of “Come On-a My House”, produced by Mitch Miller, became a hit. It was her first of many singles to hit the charts—despite the fact that Clooney hated the song passionately. She recorded several duets with Marlene Dietrich and appeared in the early 1950s on Faye Emerson’s Wonderful Town series on CBS. Clooney also did several guest appearances on the Arthur Godfrey radio show.

HOLLYWOOD

In 1954, she starred with Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye and Vera-Ellen in the movie White Christmas…

Two years later she had her own half-hour syndicated television musical-variety show, The Rosemary Clooney Show. NBC re-launched the show in a prime time slot on 1957 as The Lux Show Starring Rosemary Clooney. It lasted one season. In the late 50s and early 1960s, Clooney often appeared with Bing Crosby on television and radio. You’ll hear an excerpt from a 20-minute CBS radio program they did Monday to Friday for years that aired before the midday news.

Clooney left Columbia Records in 1958, doing a number of recordings for MGM Records and then some for Coral Records. Finally, toward the end of 1958, she signed with RCA Victor Records, where she stayed until 1963. In 1964, she went to Reprise Records, and in 1965 to Dot Records.

1970s – 2000s

After a hiatus of 11 years due to pills, alcohol and depression, Clooney signed to United Artists Records in 1976 for two albums. From 1977, she recorded an album every year for the Concord Jazz record label until her death. She was also singing on other people’s albums in 70s and 80s

In 1995, Clooney guest-starred in the NBC television medical drama ER (starring her nephew, George Clooney); for her performance, she received a Primetime Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series.

She received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002.

Here’s Rosemary Clooney on ‘What’s My Line’,

27 JULY PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney
LISTEN ONLINECommunity Radio Network Show CRN #502

107.3 2SER Tuesday 27 July 2021
12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT) and Saturdays 5 – 5:55pm
National Program
5GTR Mt Gambier Monday 2:30 – 3:30am
3MBR Murrayville Monday 3 – 4am
4NAG Keppel FM Monday 3 – 4am
2SEA Eden Monday 3 – 4am
2MIA Griffith Monday 3 – 4pm
2BAR Edge FM Bega Monday 3 – 4pm
3VKV Alpine Radio Monday 6 – 7pm
7MID Oatlands Tuesday 8 – 9pm
1ART ArtsoundFM Canberra Friday 10 – 11am
2ARM Armidale Friday 12 – 1pm
5LCM Lofty FM Adelaide Friday 1 – 2pm
4RPH Brisbane Sunday 3 – 4am
7LTN Launceston Sunday 5 – 6am
3MGB Mallacoota Sunday 5 – 6am
6GME Radio Goolarri Broome Sunday 5 – 6am
3BBR West Gippsland Sunday 5 – 6pm

Set 1
A Date With The Duke
Take The A-Train (theme) + Can’t You Read Between The Lines?
Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘A Date With The Duke’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
Back Home Again in Indiana
Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘A Date With The Duke’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
The Wish I Wish
Duke Ellington Orchestra (voc) Joya Sherill
‘A Date With The Duke’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
Cottontail
Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘A Date With The Duke’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
Set 2
1950s Jazz Radio
Sugar Beat
Eliot Lawrence Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WOR Mutual NY
1951
At Sundown
Les Brown Orchestra
‘Treasury Bandstand’
Hershey Park Ballroom
WLAN ABC Lancaster PA
1957
Give Me The Simple Life
Thelma Carpenter
‘Jazz Arts Concert’
WNBC NBC NY
4 Oct 1952
Set 3
Trad Jazz Radio
Bugle Call Rag
Red Nichols
Radio Transcription
1952
Open + South Rampart Street Parade
Preacher Rollo
‘Dixieland Club’
AFRS Re-broadcast
30 Apr 1952
Mama’s Gone, Goodbye + St Louis Blues
Kid Ory
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
5 Feb 1955
Set 4
Rosemany Clooney
‘S Wonderful
Rosemary & Betty Clooney (voc) Tony Pastor Orchestra
Aircheck
New York City
Sep 1948
Tenderly (theme) + You Make Me Feel So Young
Rosemary Clooney
‘The Rosemary Clooney Show’
KNX CBS LA
2 Nov 1954
Enchanted
Rosemary Clooney
‘Bing Crosby – Rosemary Clooney Show’
KNX CBS LA
20 Mar 1962
It’s a Most Unusual Day + Something to Remember You By
Rosemary Clooney and Bing Crosby
‘The Bing Crosby Show’
KNX CBS LA
22 Nov 1953
Set 5
1920s Comm Records
Sunday
Jean Goldkette Orchestra (voc) Keller Sisters
Comm Rec
Camden NJ
15 Oct 1926
Delirium
Red and Miff’s Stompers
Comm Rec
New York City
11 Feb 1927
Flamin’ Mamie
Coon-Sanders Nighthawks Orchestra (voc) Joe Sanders
Comm Rec
Camden NJ
21 Dec 1925
Blue Melody Blues
Tiny Praham and his Musicians
Comm Rec
Chicago
1 Feb 1929
Set 6
Buddy Rich
Love Thy Neighbour (film preview)
Henny Youngman, Jack Benny, Tommy Dorsey & more
Paramount Theatre
WOR Mutual NY
17 Dec 1940
Set 7
 Mid 1940s Swing Radio
Theme + Hamp’s Got a Duke
Lionel Hampton Orchestra
Casa Manana
Culver City Ca
KFI NBC LA
20 Jul 1947
Temptation
Harry James Orchestra (voc) Ginny Powell
Meadowbrook Gardens
KECA ABC LA
10 Feb 1946
Santa Catalina
Raymond Scott Orchestra (voc) Dorothy Collins
Palace Hotel
KQW CBS San Francisco
16 Sep 1947
Andy’s Blues
Count Basie Orchestra
Avadon Ballroom
Aircheck
Los Angeles
1946
Set 8
Women Radio Singers
Manhattan
Lee Wiley
‘Guest Star’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1950
Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen
Kay Starr (voc) Charlie Barnett Orchestra
‘For the Record’
WEAF NBC NY
11 Sep 1944
Robin Hood
Mildred Bailey
‘Music Till Midnight’
WABC CBS NY
12 Feb 1945
I Miss Your Kiss
Joya Sherill (voc) Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘A Date with the Duke’
WJZ ABC NY
12 May 1945

Baby Rose Marie 91 Years in Showbiz – Phantom Dancer 20 July 2021


Baby Rose Marie is this week’s Phantom Dancer non-stop swing jazz feature artist. She was an American actress, singer, comedian, and vaudeville performer with a career spanning nine decades in film, radio, records, theatre, night clubs and television.

Due to the current Sydney Covid lockdown I can’t mix live from the 2SER studios as I normally do on Tuesdays, so this is a ‘classic’ Phantom Dancer from ‘the 2016 vaults’ in a ‘repeat premier’ for your aural enjoyment.

Greg Poppleton has been bringing you The Phantom Dancer, your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV, each week since 1985.

Hear The Phantom Dancer online from 12:04pm AEST Tuesday 20 July at https://2ser.com/phantom-dancer/ where you can also hear two years of archived shows.

The finyl hour is vinyl.

Rose Marie, billed as ‘Baby Rose Marie’ when a child, and ‘Rose Marie’ as an adult, (one of the first major stars to be known simply by her given names) began her showbiz career at age 3.

Her mother would take her to see local vaudeville shows and afterwards Rose Marie would sing what she had heard for the neighbours. The neighbours eventually entered her in a talent contest at age 3, which she won, and so began her career as Baby Rose Marie. At five, she had her own NBC radio show. The Vitaphone Varieties film clip above was made to prove to skeptical radio listeners that Baby Rose Marie was indeed a child.

At the height of Baby Rose Marie’s fame from late 1929 to 1934, she made 17 records, (on her first disc she was backed by Fletcher Henderson’s Orchestra) and was featured in Paramount films and shorts. She made one feature film, International House (1933), with W. C. Fields.

In this long, lost and recently restored short, skip through to 7’38 to catch Baby Rose Marie…

Her record of “Say That You Were Teasing Me” (backed with “Take a Picture of the Moon”, Victor 22960) also featured Henderson’s orchestra and was a national hit in 1932. She was the last surviving entertainer to have charted a hit before World War II. She died, aged 94 in 2017.

Rose Marie was widely known for her role on the CBS situation comedy The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961–1966), as television comedy writer Sally Rogers, “who went toe-to-toe in a man’s world”. Later she portrayed Myrna Gibbons on The Doris Day Show and was a 14-year panelist on The Hollywood Squares.

She is the subject of a 2017 documentary film, Wait for Your Laugh, which includes interviews with her and her co-stars including Carl Reiner, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall, and Tim Conway.

Rose Marie performed on three 1966 and 1967 episodes of The Dean Martin Show on NBC and also twice (1964 and 1968) on The Hollywood Palace on ABC.

In the mid-1970s, she appeared in the recurring role of Hilda on the police drama S.W.A.T.. Hilda brought fresh doughnuts, made coffee for the team, and provided some comic relief.

In the early 1990s, she had a recurring role as Frank Fontana’s mother on Murphy Brown. She appeared as Roy Biggins’ domineering mother Eleanor “Bluto” Biggins in an episode of Wings. Rose Marie and Morey Amsterdam appeared together in an October 1993 episode of Herman’s Head and guest-starred in a February 1996 episode of Caroline in the City, shortly before Amsterdam’s death in October of that same year.

Rose Marie appeared opposite Phil Silvers in the hit Broadway Musical Top Banana in 1951, also appearing in the well-received 1954 film adaptation.

She later claimed that her musical numbers were cut from the film in retaliation for her publicly refusing the producer’s sexual advances. Near the end of her life, she testified that it was the only time she had ever experienced sexual harassment in the entertainment industry in her 90-year career.

In 1965, she appeared in the Dallas production of Bye Bye Birdie as Mae Peterson, the mother of the character played by Dick Van Dyke on Broadway and in the film.

From 1977 to 1985, Rose Marie co-starred with Rosemary ClooneyHelen O’Connell, and Margaret Whiting in the musical revue 4 Girls 4, which toured the United States and appeared on television several times.

Rose Marie was married to trumpeter Bobby Guy from 1946 until his death in 1964. The couple had one daughter, television producer Georgiana Guy-Rodrigues, who was born in 1947.

She was active on social media, particularly developing a following on Twitter, where she offered support for women who, like her, had suffered from sexual harassment.

Her contemporaries and modern performers offered their remembrances and condolences on the same platform; Nell Scovell called her “the patron saint of female comedy writers”.

20 JULY PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #501

107.3 2SER Tuesday 20 JULY 2021
12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT) and Saturdays 5 – 5:55pm
National Program
5GTR Mt Gambier Monday 2:30 – 3:30am
3MBR Murrayville Monday 3 – 4am
4NAG Keppel FM Monday 3 – 4am
2SEA Eden Monday 3 – 4am
2MIA Griffith Monday 3 – 4am
2BAR Edge FM Bega Monday 3 – 4am
2BRW Braidwood Monday 3 – 4am
3VKV Alpine Radio Monday 6 – 7pm
7MID Oatlands Monday 6 -7pm
6GME Radio Goolarri Broome Tuesday 12am – 1am
2MCE Bathurst Wednesday 9 – 10am
1ART ArtsoundFM Canberra Friday 10 – 11am
2ARM Armidale Friday 12 – 1pm
5LCM Lofty FM Adelaide Friday 1 – 2pm
7LTN Launceston Sunday 5 – 6am
3MGB Mallacoota Sunday 5 – 6am
3BBR West Gippsland Sunday 5 – 6pm

Set 1
Big Bands on 1946 ‘One Night Stand’ Broadcasts
Open + Song of the Wanderer
Buddy Morrow Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Roseland Ballroom
New York City
AFRS Re-broadcast
1 Mar 1946
As If I Didn’t Have Enough On My Mind + June Is Busting Out All Over
Leighton Noble Orchestra (voc) Helen Lynn
‘One Night Stand’
Starlight Roof
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
21 Jun 1946
Come Rain Come Shine
Hal McIntyre Orchestra (voc) Frankie Lester
‘One Night Stand’
Century Room
Commodore Hotel NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
15 May 1946
Set 2
Jazz on 1948 – 52 TV
Now’s The Time
Charlie Parker (as) Chubby Jackson (b) + rhythm section
WPIX TV NYC
21 Feb 1949
Down Among The Sheltering Palms + Blues
Johnny Mercer
‘Eddie Condon’s Floorshow’
WPIX TV
1948
Billie’s Other Bounce
Bop vs Dixieland (musicians announced)
‘Adventures in Jazz’
WCBS TV NYC
4 Mar 1952
Set 3
Allen Freed’s Rock’n’Roll Dance Party with Count Basie
Mambo Inn
Count Basie Orchestra
‘Rock ‘n’ Roll Dance Party’
Paramount Brooklyn
WCBS CBS NY
AFRTS Re-broadcast
1956
I Love Paris
The Robins (voc) Count Basie Orchestra
‘Rock ‘n’ Roll Dance Party’
KFWB CBS Hollywood
AFRTS Re-broadcast
1956
Basie Land + One O’Clock Jump
Count Basie Orchestra
‘Rock ‘n’ Roll Dance Party’
KFWB CBS Hollywood
AFRTS Re-broadcast
1956
Set 4
1950s Radio Singers of Songs
Open + Money Honey
Ella Mae Morse
‘Here’s To Veterans’
Radio Transcription
1954
Open + I Woke Up Crying
Joni James (voc) Les and Larry Orchestra
‘Let’s Go To Town’
Radio Transcription
1955
Too Close For Comfort + Close
Giselle MacKenzie and The Honeydreamers (voc) Skitch Henderson Orchestra
‘Airtime’
Radio Transcription
New York
1950
Set 5
Swinging Big Bands 1944 – 46 Radio
Tostiadoes
Bobby Sherwood Orchestra
Aircheck
Nov 1944
Open + Tea For Two
Bob Strong Orchestra
Glen Island Casino
New Rochelle
WOR Mutual NY
5 Aug 1944
Cottontail
Charlie Barnet Orchestra
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
Apr 1945
Floogie Boo + St Louis Blues
Cootie Williams Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Savoy Ballroom NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
12 Feb 1944
Set 6
Swing Bands on 1937-39 Radio
Toy Piano Jump
Johnny Messner Orchestra (toy piano) Professor Koleslaw
Radio Transcription
New York
1939
Popcorn Man
Benny Goodman Orchestra (voc) Martha Tilton
Madhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
6 nov 1937
I Can’t Get Started With You + In A Mist
Bunny Berrigan Orchestra
WABC CBS NY
19 Nov 1938
Farewell Blues + Moonlight Serenade (theme)
Glenn Miller Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WJZ NBC Blue NY
25 Nov 1939
Set 7
The Magic Key Celebrates Irving Berlin
Let Yourself Go + I Saw The Sea and other songs from ‘Follow The Fleet’
Ray Noble Orchestra (voc) Al Bowlly
‘The Magic Key of RCA’
WEAF NBC Red NY
New York City
9 Feb 1936
Set 8
Jazzy 1950s Radio
VIPs Boogie + Jam With Sam
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Blue Note
WMAQ NBC Chicago
30 Jul 1952
Groovin’ For Nat
Dizzy Gillespie Orchestra
Birdland
WCBS NY
Jun 1956
Blues in G
Lester Young Quintet
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
7 Aug 1956