23 April 2018 Phantom Dancer – Bea Wain First To Record ‘Over The Rainbow’


You’ll hear some very loving and touching words on today’s Phantom Dancer.

The Phantom Dancer, presented every week by actor, Greg Poppleton, Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s singer goes live from 107.3 2SER Sydney every Tuesday after the noon news.

It’s your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV sent to 22 radio stations of the Community Radio Network and online.

Hear this week’s Phantom Dancer (after 24 April), and past Phantom Dancers, online at radio 2ser.com

In the mix this week, live 1930s-60s radio by Bob Crosby, Sammy Kaye, Al Trace, Larry Clinton and Bea Wain. See the full play list below.

THOSE TOUCHING WORDS?

“Beautiful, Bea Wain, beautiful.”

Who’s Bea Wain? She’s one of the greatest singers of the Swing Era and my absolute favourite.

Who said those words? You’ll hear them on today’s Phantom Dancer in the Bea Wain set, incidentally.

It was Andre Baruch, award-winning network radio announcer, who said them spontaneously as the announcer for the 1939 ‘Your Hit Parade’ after Bea Wain sang, ‘O, You Crazy Moon’.

They were married in 1938 and remained together until his death 53 years later. Bea Wain died last August aged 100.

THE UNSUNG SINGING GREAT

Bea Wain began singing on local radio at age six. She lived in the Bronx. Her accent disappeared when she sang. She had four No. 1 hits. And she never had a singing lesson.

She also had her name shortened from Beatrice to Bea by some unknown radio exec, to save space on record labels.

Quoting from her New York Times obituary,
“I never wanted anybody to teach me how to sing,” she said in an interview with Sara Fishko for the New York public radio station WNYC in 2013. “I had piano, elocution and dancing lessons, but never singing lessons.”

And she went on to sing professionally past the age of 90.

THE BIG BREAK

Was a big band arranger and in 1938 was forming a swing band with big RCA – NBC promotion. You’ll hear the band broadcasting ‘The RCA Campus Club’ from the Glen island Casino on today’s Phantom Dancer. The singer he hired to front this important band was Bea Wain.

How’d he find her.

She was in the chorus for the Kate Smith Radio Show. She stepped forward for an eight bar solo. That was enough for Clinton. She was hired. Again quoting from her NYT obit:

“The impeccable Wain never fails to captivate us as Clinton’s brassmen play natty little curlicues around her,” Will Friedwald wrote in his book “Jazz Singing: America’s Great Voices From Bessie Smith to Bebop and Beyond” (1990).Bea wain

OVER THE RAINBOW

In 1939 Billboard magazine’s college poll voted her the most popular female vocalist. Ella Fitzgerald was second.

In 1938 she was the first to record ‘Over The Rainbow’ from the film, ‘The Wizard of Oz’. MGM, which owned the rights, stopped the record from being issued until after the film, and Judy Garland’s version (who sang it in the movie) was released.

Wain’s ‘Over The Rainbow’ is the Phantom Dancer Video of the Week. It’s interesting to hear the first-ever version, totally untouched by Garland’s version.

Wain said in a 1988 interview, that when Helen O’Connell, a fellow big band singer, was asked how it felt to be a part of music history, she replied, “If I knew it was history, we would have paid more attention.”

HIT RECORDS

In a short recording career of just a few years (she got tired of touring and the poor recording fees and rarely made records after 18 months with the Clinton band), Bea Wain had four hit records, all with Larry Clinton’s Orchestra .
1. Heart and Soul, which she introduced in the short ‘A Song is Born’ announced by Andre Baruch
2. Deep Purple
3. Cry, Baby, Cry
4. My Reverie, an up-tempo version of the Debussy piano piece ‘Reverie’ with lyrics by Larry Clinton.

‘My Reverie’ became Bea Wain’s theme song but, quoting from her New York Times obituary, “it was almost scrapped when Debussy’s heirs learned, to their horror, that the music had been adapted for a pop audience with a brisk tempo and lyrics.

But when Larry Clinton sent them his recording, Wain recalled, they replied, “If this girl sings it, O.K”

MR AND MRS MUSIC

After the World War Two, during which Bea Wain sung in Army Camps and her husband, Andre Baruch served overseas, the couple became ‘Mr and Mrs Music,’ a daily program on WMCA, New York, on which they doubled as disc jockeys and interviewers.

bea wain and andre baruch

 

They continued on radio when they moved to Palm Springs in 1973 and retired from being DJs in 1980.

After that, Bea Wain sang on TV and in clubs, (there’s a 1983 TV medley of her 1938-39 hits on YouTube).

Quoting from the Wiki article on Wain, she told Christopher Popa in a 2004 interview, “Actually, I’ve had a wonderful life, a wonderful career. And I’m still singing, and I’m still singing pretty good. This past December, I did a series of shows in Palm Springs, California, and the review said, “Bea Wain is still a giant.” It’s something called Musical Chairs. I did six shows in six different venues, and I was a smash. And I really got a kick out of it.”

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Your Phantom Dancer Video of the Week the first recording of ‘Over The Rainbow’ sung by Bea Wain in 1938 but not released until after the ‘Wizard of Oz’ (in which the song features) came out in 1939. Enjoy this original take wholly uninfluenced by Judy Garland…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #313

107.3 2SER Tuesday 24 April 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Swing and Sway with Sammy Kaye
Theme + Elmers Tune
Sammy Kaye Orchestra (voc) The Three Kaydettes
‘Spotlight Bands’
Washington DC
Blue Network
31 Jan 1942
Ad + It’s a Great Feeling
Sammy Kaye Orchestra (voc) The Kaydettes
‘Sammy Kaye Showreel’
Radio Transcription
1949
Medley: How Deep is the Ocean? + I’m In The Mood For Love + Avalon + Close
Sammy Kaye Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Hotel Astor Roof
New York City
AFRS Re-broadcast
27 Aug 1945
Set 2
Bob Crosby
Open + Mama Why Don’t You Dance With Me
Bob Crosby and The Modernaires (voc) Jerry Gray Orchestra
‘Club 15’
KNX CBS LA
25 Nov 1947
Don’t Forget Tonight Tomorrow
Bob Crosby (voc) Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Hollywood Palladium
AFRS Re-broadcast
27 Aug 1945
Muskrat Ramble
Bob Crosby Bobcats
‘Marine Corp Show’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1950
Set 3
WGN Parade of Bands Home Recordings
Open + Isn’t It Romantic
Al Trace and his Shuffle Rhythm
‘WGN Parade of Bands’
Blackhawk Restaurant
WGN Chicago
c 1950
Marie + Linger Awhile
Ted Fio Rito Orchestra
‘WGN Parade of Bands’
Chez Paree
WGN Chicago
c 1950
Bella Bella Marie + Medley: In My Dreams + I Love You So Much It Hurts
Jimmy Featherstone Orchestra (voc) JF and Peggy Murdoch
‘WGN Parade of Bands’
Walnut Room
Bismarck Hotel
WGN Chicago
c 1950
Set 4
Bea Wain
East of the Sun
Bea Wain (voc) Larry Clinton Orchestra
‘RCA Campus Club’
Glen Island Casino
New Rochelle NY
WEAF NBC Red NY
2 Jul 1938
Try, Try Again
Bea Wain and Band (voc) Larry Clinton Orchestra
‘RCA Campus Club’
Glen Island Casino
New Rochelle NY
WEAF NBC Red NY
2 Jul 1938
Oh, You Crazy Moon
Bea Wain
‘Your Hit Parade’
WEAF NBC Red NY
7 Oct 1939
Set 5
Swing Trumpet Stars on Ballads
Cirribirribin (theme) + You’re In Love With Someone Else
Harry James Orchestra (voc) Helen Forrest
Hotel Astor Roof
WABC CBS NY
28 Aug 1942
Oh What It Seemed To Be
Erskine Hawkins Orchestra (voc) Jimmy Mitchell
‘One Night Stand’
Blue Room
Hotel Lincoln NY
AFRS Re-broadcast
1 May 1946
Goodnight, Good Neighbour
Charlie Spivak Orchestra (voc) Irene Daye
‘One Night Stand’
Century Room
Hotel Commodore NY
AFRS Re-broadcast
25 Feb 1945
Clouds
Henry Busse Orchestra (voc) Carl Grayson
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1935
Set 6
Hal Kemp and Skinnay Ennis Sells Beauty Creme
When Summer Is Gone (theme) + You’ve Got Me Crying Again
Hal Kemp Orchestra (voc) Skinnay Ennis
‘Lavena Program’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1934
Last Year’s Girl
Hal Kemp Orchestra (voc) Skinnay Ennis
‘Lavena Program’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1934
It’s Only A Paper Moon + Ad
Hal Kemp Orchestra (voc) Skinnay Ennis
‘Lavena Program’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1934
I Couldn’t Tell Them What To Do
Hal Kemp Orchestra (voc) Skinnay Ennis
‘Lavena Program’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1934
Set 7
1950s-60s Radio Swing Bands
One O’Clock Jump + Blee Blop Blues
Count Basie Orchestra
‘Stars in Jazz’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
14 Jan 1953
Cohn’s Alley
Woody Herman’s Third Herd
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Peony park
WOW NBC Omaha
1954
Song of India
Dorsey Brothers’ Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Statler
WRCA NBC NY
Dec 1955
Flashback From The Future
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Aircheck
24 Oct 1965
Set 8
Mickey Mouse Bands Live and Transcribed
Romance (theme) + We Just Couldn’t Say Goodbye
Ray Herbeck and his Music with Romance Orchestra (voc) Lorraine Benson
Trianon Ballroom
WGN Chicago
24 Nov 1947
I’ll See You In My dreams
Jan Garber Orchestra
Radio Transcription
1941
Would It Make Any Difference To You?
Carl Ravazza Orchestra (voc) CR
Radio Transcription
1943
Can’t We Be Friends?
Johnny Mesner Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
1939
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17 April 2018 Phantom Dancer – Johnny Green Body and Soul


Johnny Green was a U.S composer, songwriter, pianist, band leader and orchestra conductor. His most famous song is ‘Body and Soul’.

On this week’s Phantom Dancer we’ll be hearing a few of the 1930s radio orchestras lead by Johnny Green. Below, your Phantom Dancer Video of the Week is a short film simulating a Johnny Green radio broadcast. The short was made in 1935.

This week you’ll also hear sets with Patti Page, Johnny Ray and Erroll Garner from live 1957 TV and some of the great swing bands from the 1930s live on the 1938-39 BBC series, ‘America Dances’.

Produced and presented by Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s singer, Greg Poppleton, The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-1960s radio and TV every week.

Hear this week’s Phantom Dancer (after 17 April) and past Phantom Dancers online at radio 2ser.com

JOHN ‘JOHNNY’ WALDO GREEN

He won four Academy Awards for his film scores and a fifth for producing a short musical film. And he went by the name of John or ‘Maestro’ in his later years.

As you’ll hear on today’s live 1930s radio broadcasts of Johnny Green and his Orchestra, Green couldn’t help but be self-assured.

He entered Harvard at age 15. You’ll hear him talk today on a 1939 aircheck about his early music schooling and his first song as a kid.

Indeed, by the time he was at Harvard, bandleader Guy Lombardo had heard Green’s Gold Coast Orchestra and hired him to create dance arrangements for his nationally famous Lombardo orchestra.

JAZZ STANDARDS

Green’s first song hit was written for the Lombardo orchestra. It was Coquette (1928), which Green wrote when he was 19.

Two years later, in 1930, Green wrote ‘Body and Soul’ which is now a jazz standard.

In the early 30s he was the radio and recording accompanist and arranger to singers James Melton, Libby Holman and Ethel Merman, and as you’ll hear on this week’s Phantom Dancer, Ruth Etting. He was also arranger and conductor for Paramount Pictures.

In this period he also wrote the standards ‘Out Of Nowhere’ (which you’ll hear in play today), ‘Rain Rain Go Away’, ‘I Cover the Waterfront’, ‘You’re Mine You’, ‘I Wanna Be Loved’ (his 1934 Oldsmobile show theme song), ‘Easy Come Easy Go’, ‘Repeal The Blues’ and the theme for Max Fleischer’s Betty Boop cartoons.

johnny green record

Nathaniel Shilkret and Paul Whiteman commissioned Green to write larger works for orchestra, including ‘Night Club: Six Impressions for Orchestra with Three Pianos’.

After spending 1933 in London, where he wrote the first musical comedy ever for BBC Radio, Green returned to New York City where, William S. Paley, president of the Columbia Broadcasting System and an investor in New York’s St. Regis Hotel, encouraged him to form what became known as Johnny Green, his Piano and Orchestra.

And he continued to lead his orchestra in top ranking radio shows into the 1940s, backing singers such as Fred Astaire and Alan Jones.

In the early 40s, Green moved to Hollywood. He became one of the people central to changing the overall sound of the MGM Symphony Orchestra.

ACADEMY AWARDS

He was Music Director at MGM from 1949 to 1959 and was nominated for an Oscar thirteen times. He won the award for the musical scores of Easter Parade, An American in Paris, West Side Story, and Oliver!, as well as for producing the short “The Merry Wives of Windsor Overture”, which won in the Short Subjects (One-Reel) category in 1954.

johnny green an american in paris

After leaving MGM, Green guest-conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Denver Symphony Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and Hollywood Bowl Orchestra. He also continued to compose the occasional filmscore, including the critically acclaimed They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? in 1969. He conducted the orchestra for the 1961 United Artists’ film version of West Side Story, for which he won a Grammy.

Green was a chairman of the music branch of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, leading the orchestra through 17 of the Academy Award telecasts.

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Your Phantom Dancer Video of the Week is a short film from 1935 of a Johnny Green Orchestra broadcast in action, with announcer Harry von Zell. I like the short scene of the ‘old radio listener’ slapping his knee with laughter. Enjoy…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #311

107.3 2SER Tuesday 17 April 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Swing Bands on 1944-46 Radio
Theme + Boyd’s Nest
Boyd Raeburn Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Club Morrocco
Los Angeles
AFRS Re-broadcast
19 Aug 1946
Begin the Beguine
Bobby Sherwood Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Avadon Ballroom
Los Angeles
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 Jun 1946
A Fellow on a Furlough + Blue Skies
Bob Chester Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
Chicago
AFRS Re-broadcast
8 Oct 1944
Set 2
1950s Hipster Radio
Bling, Bling!
Machito
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
1951
Stuffy
Coleman Hawkins and Roy Eldridge
‘Stars in Jazz’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
1952
Cherry Blossom + Close
Georgie Auld
‘Here’s To Veteran’s’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1954
Set 3
Women Pop Singers on the Air
Open + Poor, Poor People of Paris
Giselle McKenzie
‘Airtime’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1945
I Love You, Yes I Do
Ella Mae Morse
‘Here’s To Veteran’s’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1954
Cry Me A River
Julie London
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
The Cameo
WRCA NBC NY
1956
Set 4
Johnny Green on 1930s Radio
Bio + Penny Serenade
Johnny Green Orchestra
‘Fitch Bandwagon’
WEAF NBC Red NY
9 Apr 1939
Out of Nowhere + I Want To Love (theme)
Johnny Green (voc) Ruth Etting
‘Oldsmobile Show’
WABC CBS NY
27 Feb 1934
Row, Row, Row
Johnny Green Orchestra (voc) Ray Bloch Swing 14
‘Rhymo’
WABC CBS NY
26 May 1940
Set 5
Eddy Howard Ballard Singer
Careless (theme) + Thou Swell
Eddy Howard (voc) and his Orchestra
Aragon Ballroom
Mutual Network, Chicago
5 Dec 1945
I Wish I Was A Willow
Eddy Howard (voc) Dick Jurgens Orchestra
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1938
Sailboat in the Moonlight
Eddy Howard (voc) and his Orchestra
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1939
Medley + So Long For Now (theme)
Eddy Howard (voc) and his Orchestra
Aragon Ballroom
Mutual Network, Chicago
5 Dec 1945
Set 6
1950s Radio Swing Bands
Blue Flame (theme) + Hollywood Blues
Woody Herman Orchestra
Blue Room
Hotel Roosevelt
WWL CBS New Orleans
1951
Hob Nail Boogie
Count Basie Orchestra
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
31 Aug 1952
Flager’s Drive
Dorsey Brothers’ Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WCBS CBS NY
1 Jan 1956
Summertime
Claude Thornhill Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Steel Pier
Atlantic City NJ
AFRS Re-broadcast
24 Aug 1956
Set 7
America Dances on the BBC
Open + Over The Waves
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘America Dances’
New York City
BBC London
1939
Every Tub + Song of the Wanderer
Count Basie Orchestra
‘America Dances’
New York City
BBC London
1939
Body and Soul
Teddy Wilson Orchestra
‘America Dances’
New York City
BBC London
1939
Two O’Clock Jump + Close
Harry James Orchestra
‘America Dances’
New York City
BBC London
19 Jul 1939
Set 8
The Big Record TV Show
Intro + I’ve Got My Love To Keep Me Warm
Patti Page
‘The Big Record’
CBS TV NY
27 Nov 1957
Ad + Cry + Soliloquy of a Fool
Johnny Ray
‘The Big Record’
CBS TV NY
27 Nov 1957
Where or When + Tea For Three
Erroll Garner
‘The Big Record’
CBS TV NY
27 Nov 1957

3 April 2018 Phantom Dancer. Helen Keller On How The Deaf Heard Radio Music In The 1920s


There’re some rare, rare early jazz radio broadcasts for your listening pleasure on this week’s Phantom Dancer. And below, read an insight from Helen Keller about how radio brought music to the deaf in the 1920s.

The Phantom Dancer is produced and presented by Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s-style singer and band leader, Greg Poppleton.

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV. It’s made in the studios of 2SER in Sydney. The Phantom Dancer is heard across Australia on stations of the Community Radio Network.

Hear this week’s Phantom Dancer (and past Phantom Dancers online) at radio 2ser.com

Greg Poppleton music website.

In this week’s mix, you’ll hear sets of radio broadcasts by Buddy Rich, Benny Goodman over three days in October 1937 and The Andrew Sisters. There’s also a set of WW2 European dance bands from Prague, Moscow and Hilversum. The Prague recording features Andrew Sisters soundalikes, The Allan Sisters (Allanovy Sestry).

But the rare, rare radio comes from January 1929. Four ‘Sunny Meadows Washing Machine Programs’ featuring the Ray Miller Orchestra. These were recorded on five minute 78 rpm discs – six discs to a 30 minute show.

1920s radio set
1920s radio set

And that got me thinking about 1920s radio and how it was perceived. That’s when I found two letters from 1924 and 1926 quoted by Timmy D. Taylor in his paper, ‘Music and the Rise of Radio in 1920s
America: technological imperialism, socialization, and the transformation of intimacy’, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2002.

The two letters come from the very early years of radio as a mass entertainment medium. They both describe how deaf people could ‘hear’ music on the radio.

 

HELEN KELLER REPORTS…

Helen Keller
Helen Keller

The first letter is from the famous deaf and blind social activist, Helen Keller, in 1924.

It is a letter to the Symphony Society of New York and describes her joy at hearing a symphonic concert on WEAF Radio, New York City.

“I have the joy of being able to tell you that, though deaf and blind, I spent a glorious hour last night listening over the radio to Beethoven’s ‘Ninth Symphony.’

I do not mean to say that I ‘heard’ the music in the sense that other people heard it; and I do not know whether I can make you understand how it was possible for me to derive pleasure from the symphony. It was a great
surprise to myself. I had been reading in my magazine for the blind of the happiness that the radio was bringing to the sightless everywhere. I was delighted to know that the blind had gained a new source of enjoyment; but
I did not dream that I could have any part in the joy.

Last night, when the family was listening to your wonderful rendering of the immortal symphony some one suggested that I put my hand on the receiver and see if I could get any of the vibrations. He unscrewed the top, and I lightly touched the sensitive diaphragm. What was my amazement to discover that I could feel, not only the vibrations, but also the impassioned rhythm, the throb and the urge of the music. The intertwined and intermingling vibrations from different instruments enchanted me. I could actually distinguish the cornets, the roll of the drums, deep-toned violas and violins singing in exquisite unison. How the lovely speech of the violins flowed and flowed over the deepest tones of the other instruments! When the human voices leaped up thrilling from the surge of harmony, I recognized them instantly as voices. I felt the chorus grow more exultant, more ecstatic, upcurving swift and flame-like, until my heart almost stood still. The women’s voices seemed an embodiment of all the angelic voices rushing in a harmonious flood of beautiful and inspiring sound. The great chorus throbbed against my Žfingers with poignant pause and flow. Then all the instruments and voices together burst forth—an ocean of heavenly vibration—and died away like winds with the atom is spent, ending in a delicate shower of sweet notes.

Of course, this was not hearing, but I do know that the tones and harmonies conveyed to me moods of great beauty and majesty. I also sensed, or thought I did, the tender sounds of nature that sing into my hand—swaying reeds and
winds and the murmur of streams. I have never been so enraptured before by a multitude of tone-vibrations. As I listened, with darkness and melody, shadow and sound filling all the room, I could not help remembering that the great composer who poured forth such a flood of sweetness into the world was deaf like myself. I marveled
at the power of his quenchless spirit by which out of his pain he wrought such joy for others—and there I sat, feeling with my hand the magniŽficent symphony which broke like a sea upon the silent shores of his soul and mine.

Let me thank you warmly for all the delight which your beautiful music has brought to my household and to me. I want also to thank Station WEAF for the joy they are broadcasting in the world.”

 

JAZZING THE DEAF

The second report about the deaf ‘hearing’ radio in the 1920s comes from ‘Jazzing the deaf by radio’, Popular Radio, March 1926, p. 296.

“This information has been conveyed to Paul Ash, orchestra leader and radio star of KYW in letters from several women who explain that these are the only sounds they have been able to hear and that they enjoy the jazz music although otherwise deaf.

A famous ear specialist of Chicago has become interested in the subject, it is reported, and is conducting a series of tests to determine the possibilities of utilizing this means of ‘bone conduction’ of sound so that those
who have lost normal hearing may through radio have the pleasures of music.

When the unique investigation has been completed the renowned specialist promises the issuance of a report and a test program over the air is to be given with deaf persons asked to ‘listen in’ and to report what they ‘hear’.”

 

VIDEOS OF THE WEEK

Your Phantom Dancer Videos of the Week feature Helen Keller herself.

In the first video, the teacher who taught her to speak, Anne Sullivan (who was blind herself), explains with Helen demonstrating, how Helen learnt to talk after hitherto being dumb as well as deaf and blind. Her first word was ‘it’. Her first sentence, “I am not dumb now.” Be amazed…

And here is a 1919 dramatisation of her childhood. The film is called ‘Deliverance’…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #309

107.3 2SER Tuesday 3 April 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Russ Morgan his Wah-Wah Trombone and his Orchestra
Does Your Heart Beat For Me?
Russ Morgan Orchestra
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1937
Sheik of Araby
Russ Morgan Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
AFRS Re-broadcast
28 Apr 1944
Open Up That Door and Let Me In + So Long (Close)
Russ Morgan Orchestra (voc) Al Jennings
‘One Night Stand’
Garden Room
Hotel Claremont
Berkeley Ca
AFRS Re-broadcast
28 Jun 1945
Set 2
Andrew Sisters on Radio
Open + Atcheson, Topeka and Santa Fe
Andrew Sisters with Raymond Paige Orchestra
‘Kraft Music Hall’
KFI NBC LA
6 Sep 1945
Begin the Beguine
Andrew Sisters with Glenn Miller Orchestra
‘Chesterfield Show’
WABC CBS NY
31 Jan 1940
White Christmas + Jingle Bells Nash Ad + Apple Blossom Time (Close)
Andrew Sisters with Curt Massey and Vic Schoen Orchestra
‘Nash – Kelvinator Show’
KNX CBS Los Angeles
19 Dec 1945
Set 3
Swing from WWII Europe
Poznate lehce nas rytmus
Allanovy Sestry
Comm Rec
Prague
17 Dec 1942
Baron von der Pschek (Bel Mir Bist Du Schoen)
Leonid Utesov
Comm Rec
Moscow
1943
Ja
De Ramblers (voc) Ferry Barendse and Band
Comm Rec
Hilversum
2 Mar 1944
Set 4
Benny Goodman – 3 Days in October 1937
Stardust on the Moon + Dear Old Southland
Benny Goodman Orchestra
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
20 Oct 1937
Where or When + Someday Sweetheart
Benny Goodman Trio and Orchestra
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
20 Oct 1937
Dixieland Band + Goodbye
Benny Goodman Orchestra (voc) Martha Tilton
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WOR Mutual NY
23 Oct 1937
Set 5
Duke Ellington on 1951-53 Radio
VIP’s Boogie
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Aircheck
Coeur d’Alene, Idaho
4 Oct 1953
Things Ain’t What They Used To Be
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WNBC NBC New York
11 Jun 1951
Great Times
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
11 Feb 1951
Just a Sit-in’ and a Rockin’ + Mood Indigo
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Blue Note
WMAQ NBC Chicago
13 Aug 1952
Set 6
Ray Miller on 1929 Radio
Open + Angry
Ray Miller Orchestra
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
I’ll Never Ask For More
Ray Miller Orchestra
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
I Ain’t Got Nobody
Ray Miller Orchestra (voc) Mary Williams
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
Tell Me Who + There’s No Place Like Home (theme)
Ray Miller Orchestra (voc) Bob Nolan
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
25 Jan 1929
Set 7
Bob Crosby 1939 Radio
South Rampart Street Parade
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
27 Jun 1939
Little Rock Getaway
Bob Crosby Orchestra (piano) Joe Sullivan
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
4 Jul 1939
O, You Crazy Moon
Bob Crosby Orchestra (voc) Helen Ward
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
11 Jul 1939
Diga Diga Doo
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
18 Jul 1939
Set 8
Buddy Rich Radio
Rain on the Riff (theme) + Cool Breeze
Buddy Rich Orchestra
‘Spotlight Bands’
Phoenixville PA
Mutual
24 Dec 1945
Nellie’s Nightmare
Buddy Rich Orchestra
Aircheck
New York City
1947
In a Prescribed Manner
Buddy Rich Quintet
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
7 Nov 1958

27 March Phantom Dancer – Bunny Berigan and How Disease Effects Legacy


It never ceases to amaze me how disease can over-shadow the brilliant legacy of a person’s life. How much ‘expert’ blather was there about Stephen Hawking’s motor neurone disease as an excuse to avoid explaining and understanding his discoveries in physics? It’s belittling and disrespectful.

Louis Armstrong’s favourite trumpet player was Bunny Berigan. We’ll be hearing radio broadcasts by Bunny Berigan on this week’s The Phantom Dancer.

Even today, seventy years after his death, he is still considered to have been one of the top trumpet players in jazz.

But what I find additionally interesting is how his legacy has been marred by the alcoholism that affected the inventiveness of his playing in the latter part of his short thirty-three years and which ultimately killed him through cirrhosis of the liver.

On this week’s Phantom Dancer you’ll also hear a set of live vintage radio by Dave Brubeck, Jack Teagarden and women singers with their own radio shows – Lee Wiley, Peggy Lee, Dinah Show and Mildred Bailey.

 

THE PHANTOM DANCER is two hours of non-stop swing and jazz mixed from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV by Greg Poppleton, Australia’s only authentic 1920s-1930s singer www.gregpoppletonmusic.com

Broadcast 12:04pm Tuesdays 107.3 2SER Sydney then over 22 radio stations and online.

HEAR The Phantom Dancer live-streamed and afterwards online on the Radio 2SER website. http://www.2ser.com/phantom-dancer/

HOW DISEASE EFFECTS LEGACY

When jazz musicians talk about Bunny Berigan, his alcoholism always comes up.

‘What might have been had he not drank?’, is usually the most positive musing. But to me, from a music perspective, his illness should have no bearing on his legacy. Surely it’s his trumpet playing and technique that’s important, the music played, the songs composed, the landmark recordings made. Louis Armstrong praised Bunny Berigan’s trumpet sound and jazz ideas both before and after Berigan’s death.

I have known jazz musicians, world-touring, who’ve died after long illnesses. They kept their illnesses private, performing to the very end. Even though everyone knew they were terminally ill, the particulars of their illnesses were never discussed. These musicians had the luxury and the determination to never be defined by their disease. Nowadays, when people talk about them, they talk about their music, the good times and their positive legacy. How they died, their disease, and their substance abuse (in one case) are irrelevancies.

However, other jazz musicians I have known, have had deaths after long, debilitating illnesses during which time it was impossible to perform. Others have died suddenly – a heart attack, an overdose, a bleed. Always, these musicians are discussed in terms of their deaths, their creative life work overshadowed by the fabula of their failing health or their fatal surprise.

I guess it’s easier to talk about sickness and death than music. The musical process is a specialist field. Feeling poorly and falling off the perch is something on which everyone has an expert opinion.

BUNNY BERIGAN…
…was the stage name of Roland Bernard Berigan.

He composed, sang, and most famously was a brilliant trumpet player. Of his compositions, we’ll hear a live recording of one, ‘Chicken and Waffles’, from a live 1936 radio broadcast on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

He was best known for his virtuoso jazz trumpeting. His 1937 classic recording of a song from a flop music, ‘I Can’t Get Started’ (which we’ll also hear in two live 1930s versions on this week’s Phantom Dancer) was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1975. ‘I Can’t Get Started’ was Berigan’s radio theme when he launched his own band in 1937.

Bunny Berigan had learnt violin and trumpet and was playing in local bands by his mid-teens. In 1930 he joined the Hal Kemp Orchestra and soon came to notice. He became a sought-after studio musician in New York as well as playing in the orchestras of Freddy Rich, Freddy Martin, Ben Selvin, Paul Whiteman and Benny Goodman. In fact, Goodman’s manager only got ‘that ace drummer man’ Gene Krupa to join the band by telling him Berigan was already on board.

After leaving Goodman, Berigan began to record regularly under his own name and to back singers such as Bing Crosby, Mildred Bailey, and Billie Holiday. We’ll hear him this week with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in early 1937. His solo on ‘Marie’ became one of his signature performances. We’ll hear a 1940 radio version. And, of course, a critic describing Berigan’s trumpet on the 1940 show had to bring up his alcoholism.

After leaving Goodman, Berigan began to record regularly under his own name and to back singers such as Bing Crosby, Mildred Bailey, and Billie Holiday. We’ll hear him this week with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in early 1937. His solo on ‘Marie’ became one of his signature performances. We’ll hear a 1940 radio version. And, of course, a critic describing Berigan’s trumpet on the 1940 show had to bring up his alcoholism.

MUSICAL ADVICE FROM BERIGAN
And instrumentalists PLEASE TAKE NOTE. There’s nothing more irritating to a singer than an instrumentalist taking too much air during the singer’s solo, or cramping the singer’s freedom of expression by trying to steer the improvisation…

Your Phantom Dancer Bunny Berrigan singing and playing trumpet on ‘Until Today’ with Freddy Rich’s Orchestra in 1936 . Enjoy!

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #308

107.3 2SER Tuesday 20 March 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Swing on 1940s Radio
Theme + Girl of My Dreams
Randy Brooks Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Roseland Ballroom NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
17 Nov 1945
K.C. Caboose + Are You Happy?
John Kirby Sextet
‘One Night Stand’
Aquarium Restaurant NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
18 Jul 1944
They Didn’t Believe Me + Blue Moon (Close)
Eliot Lawrence Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Roseland Ballroom NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
26 Jul 1945
Set 2
Big Bands on 1950s Radio
Theme + I’m Walking
Johnny Richards Orchestra
‘ABC Dancing Party’
Birdland
WABC ABC NYC
1957
If I Had You
Ted Heath Orchestra
‘International Bandstand’
London
NBC/BBC
2 Mar 1959
It’s All In The Game
Ray Anthony Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
AFRS Re-broadcast
1952
Set 3
Bing Crosby Radio
Open + Pistol Packin’ Mama
Bing Crosby
‘Kraft Music Hall’
KFI NBC LA
16 Dec 1943
Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ra
Bing Crosby
’Philco Radio Time’
KECA ABC LA
19 Nov 1947
Ukulele Lady + Green Grow The Lilacs + Close
Bing Crosby + Rosemary Clooney (2nd song)
’Bing Crosby-Rosemary Clooney Show’
KNX CBS LA
19 Oct 1961
Set 4
Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street
Open + Dixieland One-Step
Henry Levine Octet
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
O Sussanah
Diane Courtney
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Cheery-Beery-Bee
The Tune Toppers
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Dangerous Mood
Paul Lavalle Woodwinds
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Set 5
Trombonist Jack Teagarden
Announcer’s Blues
Paul Whiteman Orchestra
‘Paul Whiteman’s Music Varieties’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
19 jan 1936
Mr Jessie
Jack Teagarden Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Chicago
22 Nov 1941
You Took Advantage of Me + Tea For Two + Close
The Three T’s (Jack and Charlie Teagarden and Frank Trambauer)
Hickory House
WEAF NBC Red NY
9 Dec 1936
(1936 Home Recording)
Wolverine Blues + Close
Jack Teagarden Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Chicago
27 Dec 1941
Set 6
Women Singers With Their Own Radio shows
Somebody Loves Me
Peggy Lee
‘Peggy Lee Show’
KNX CBS LA
1947
Beg Your Pardon
Dinah Shore
‘Dinah Shore Show’
KNX CBS LA
4 May 1948
Too Good To Be True
Lee Wiley
‘Lee Wiley Sings’
WABC CBS NY
1 Jul 1936
Summertime
Mildred Bailey
‘Mildred Bailey Show’
WABC CBS NY
12 Jan 1945
Set 7
Bunny Berigan
I Can’t Get Started (theme) + Organ Grinder’s Swing
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
‘Norge Program’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1937
I Can’t Get Started (theme) + Ay, Ay, Ay
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
Manhattan Centre
WNEW NY
26 Sep 1939
Marie
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (Bunny Berigan tp feature)
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WABC CBS NY
9 Mar 1940
Runnin’ Wild + Chicken and Waffles
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
‘Saturday Night Swing Club’
WABC CBS NY
31 Oct 1936
Set 8
Dave Brubeck
This Can’t Be Love
Dave Brubeck
Aircheck
Jan 1954
The Song Is For You
Dave Brubeck
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
Mar 1957
Stardust
Dave Brubeck
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
Dec 1953
All The Things You Are
Dave Brubeck
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
Feb 1956

6 March Phantom Dancer – Hans Albers, The German John Wayne and a Clown Called Quick.


The Phantom Dancer is presented by authentic 1920s – 30s singer, Greg Poppleton..

The Phantom Dancer, goes to the movies this week. In one of the vinyl sets in the last hour, you’ll hear movie songs hits by 1930s-40s German film star, Hans Albers. (You’ll also hear sets of Raymond Scott, Louis Armstrong and Woody Herman from live 1940s radio)

Hear the mix after the 27 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com

Why Hans Albers?

I am in the process of memorising the German lyrics for ‘La Paloma’. La Paloma is probably the most recorded Spanish song in history. It has become a quasi-folk song in many cultures. Written by Sebastián Yradier as a contradanza (the progenitor of danzon, mambo and cha cha cha), it was published in Madrid in 1859 as a ‘Cancion Americana con acompañamiento de Piano’.

The lyrics I’m learning are those sung by Hans Albers in the 1943 film ‘Grosse Freiheit Nr 7’. This is one of three films in the Nazi era that celebrated the individual rather than fascist corporatist ideas.

Also in this week’s Phantom Dancer we’ll hear a set of swing from live 1936 radio. Other sets are dedicated to 1940s dance orchestras and there’s two sets of music radio from the 1950s.

 

HANS PHILIPP AUGUST ALBERS…

…was one of the most popular German actors, and singers, of the twentieth century.

He was an actor in theatre and in more than a hundred silent films.

He then starred in the first German talkie Die Nacht gehört uns (The Night is Ours) in 1929. He was the big-mouthed strong man Mazeppa alongside Marlene Dietrich in her star-making film Der blaue Engel (The Blue Angel) in 1930.

Albers himself hit stardom that same year in the movie, The Copper.

In 1932 he starred in my favourite Albers film, ‘Quick’ in which he plays two roles, one being an English vaudeville clown, speaking German in an English accent.

Many of Albers’ movie songs became huge hits. We’ll hear four of them today on The Phantom Dancer, including ‘Gnaedige Frau komm’ und spiel’ mid mir’ from ‘Quick’. In the film he sings the song after sliding down a giant banjo on a theatre stage, then flying around the theatre until he lands on one of the balconies to serenade his lady love.

Although Albers became Germany’s most popular actor under the Nazi regime, he never supported the Nazis. He instead supported his Jewish girlfriend Hansi Berg. She left for Switzerland, then England in 1939, with Hans Albers continuing to financially support her until they reunited after the war. They stayed together until his death.

Nevertheless, he continued to star in major films during the war in ‘hero’ roles. After 1945, when the occupation powers didn’t want German heroes in German films, he was typecast in wise-aged-man roles.

He remained active in film and theatre until three months before his death due to alcohol related disease in 1960.

TWO PHANTOM DANCER VIDEOS OF THE WEEK!

Your Phantom Dancer ‘Video of the Week’ #1 shows Hans Albers as the singing hero in living Agfacolour.

It’s the song, La Paloma, from the 1943 movie, Grosse Freiheit Nr7. Enjoy…

Your Phantom Dancer ‘Video of the Week’ #2 shows Hans Albers as vaudeville clown, Quick.

It’s the song, La Paloma, from the 1943 movie, Grosse Freiheit Nr7. Enjoy…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #306

107.3 2SER Tuesday 6 March 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Woody Herman Orchestra and Vocals on 1940s Radio
Blue Flame (Theme) + I’m Going To See My Baby
Woody Herman Orchestra (voc) WH
‘One Night Stand’
Empire Room
Rice Hotel
Houston
1955
There, I Said It Again
Woody Herman Orchestra (voc) WH
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
21 Jul 1945
I Ain’t Got Nothin’ But The Blues + Blue Flame (theme)
Woody Herman Orchestra (voc) WH
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
21 Aug 1944
Set 2
Club Hangover
Relaxin’ At The Trouro (Theme) + Sensation Rag
Muggsy Spanier
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
20 Nov 1954
Riverside Blues
Muggsy Spanier
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
20 Nov 1954
Royal Garden Blues + I’ve Got A Right To Sing The Blues (theme)
Jack Teagarden
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
17 Apr 1954
Set 3
Dance Bands on 1940s Radio
Theme + Octave Jump
Bob Chester Orchestra
’One Night Stand’
College Inn
Hotel Sherman, Chicago
AFRS Re-broadcast
8 Oct 1944
Personality + I’m Getting Sentimental Over You (theme)
Sy Oliver Orchestra (voc) Buddy Moreno
’Endorsed By Dorsey’
WOR Mutual NY
3 Mar 1946
With My Head In The Clouds + Lady Be Good
Glenn Miller AAF Orchestra (voc) Johnny Desmond and the Modernaires
’Uncle Sam Presents’
WEAF NBC NY
12 Feb 1944
Set 4
Frank Sinatra on Your Hit Parade 1943-44
I’ve Heard That Song Before
Frank Sinatra
‘Your Hit Parade’ (Dress Rehearsal)
WEAF NBC NY
27 Feb 1943
I’ll Be Seeing You
Frank Sinatra
‘Your Hit Parade’
WEAF NBC NY
26 Aug 1944
I Love You + Theme
Frank Sinatra
‘Your Hit Parade’
WEAF NBC NY
6 May 1944
Set 5
Hans Albers 1930s movie Hits
Hoppla, jets komm’ ich
Hans Albers
Movie: ‘Der Sieger’ 1932
La Paloma
Hans Albers
Movie: Grosse Freiheit Nr7, 1943
Gnaedige Frau, komm’ und spiel’ mit mir
Hans Albers
Movie: ‘Quick’, 1932
Goodbye Jonny
Hans Albers
Movie: Wasser fuer Canitoga 1939
Set 6
Raymond Scott on the Air
I’ll Be Around
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
1944
Blues Theme
Raymond Scott ‘The Captivators’
WABC CBS NY
10 Jan 1943
In A Magic Garden
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Rose Room
Palace Hotel
KQW CBS San Francisco
Apr 1944
Four Beat Shuffle + Pretty Little Petticoat (theme)
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Red Chicago
1940
Set 7
Hit Of The Week Cardboard Records
You Bought a New Kind of Love to Me
Don Vorhees Orchestra (tp either Red Nichols or Bob Effros)(voc) Dick Robertson
‘Hit of the Week’ Record
New York City
Aug 1930
Cheer Up – Ballyhoo
Phil Spitalny Music (voc) Eddie Cantor (v) Joe Venuti (tp) Bob Effros
‘Hit of the Week’ Record
New York City
Oct 1931
I’ll Be Blue
Hit of the Week Orchestra (tp) Manny Klein (voc) Dick Robertson
‘Hit of the Week’ Record
New York City
Nov 1930
Reaching For The Moon
Sam Lanin Orchestra (voc) Scrappy Lambert
‘Hit of the Week’ Record
New York City
Mar 1931
Set 8
Louis Armstrong On 1943-44 Radio
Brother Bill
Louis Armstrong Orchestra (voc) LA
‘Spotlight Bands’
Geiger Field
Blue Network
1943
If I Could Be With You (One Hour Tonight)
Louis Armstrong Orchestra (voc) LA
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
1943
Lazy River
Louis Armstrong Orchestra (voc) LA
‘Spotlight Bands’
Dallas TX
Blue Network
17 Aug 1943
It Had To Be You + Close
Louis Armstrong Orchestra (voc) LA
‘Spotlight Bands’
Tuskagee, Alabama
Blue Network
5 Oct 1944

27 Feb Phantom Dancer – Errol Buddle Dead, The Last Australian In The Australian Jazz Quintet.


The Phantom Dancer is presented by authentic 1920s – 30s singer, Greg Poppleton.

It’s your two hour non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV.

Hear the mix after the 27 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com

This week, The Phantom Dancer, bids farewell to Sydney jazz identity, jazz bassoon and sax great –  the last Australian in the Australian Jazz Quartet, Errol Buddle.

Errol died last week and The Phantom Dancer brings you a broadcast he made with the AJQ in 1956.

australian jazz quartet

AUSTRALIAN JAZZ QUARTET/QUINTET

The broadcast of the Australian Jazz Quintet is from Birdland as part of the NBC Radio Series ‘The All-Star Parade of Bands’.

I make these cultural observations about the broadcast:

1. Fred Collins, NBC announcer, network jazz DJ and ‘expert’, obviously doesn’t know what to do with The Australian Jazz Quintet. He comes across like he hasn’t done his research. He’s polite, almost seeming to damn with very faint praise. And the AJQ get short shrift from Fred in the promotion department.

2. The All-Star Parade of Bands usually has two bands doing 13 minutes each with an ad in between as the second band sets up. In this broadcast, the AJQ do two songs in the middle and the closing theme. Most of the show is given to Carmen McRae.

3. The American in the AJQ is the spokesman for the group on the radio.

4. The AJQ use voicings and phrasings that hark back to the Australian dance bands of the late 30s and 1940s. This, as well as jazz bassoon, must have sounded uncomfortable to New York jazz ears who went for an overload of the safe and familiar with Carmen.

5. The NBC live recording for the AJQ is rather indistinct sounding. Carmen and her pianist is much more present in the radio mix.

 

WHO WERE THE AJQ?

They were three Australians and one American. The Australians were Errol Buddle (bassoon and tenor saxophone), Bryce Rohde (piano), and Jack Brokensha (vibraphone and percussion).

ajq

Errol Buddle, who played in the Sydney Jazz Scene , died last week.

Bryce Rohde returned to the U.S. from Australia in 1965 and played in the San Francisco jazz scene until he died in 2016.

Jack Brokensha returned to Detroit after the 1958 AJQ Australian tour.  He was hired by Berry Gordy of Motown Records as a percussionist. He was one of the few white members of Motown’s Hitsville U.S.A. recording studio’s house band, The Funk Brothers. He was given the nickname “White Jack”, to distinguish him from Jack Ashford, an African American percussionist nicknamed “Black Jack”.

 

THE AJQ STORY

Errol Buddle, Bryce Rohde and Jack Brokensha went to Windsor, Ontario, Canada in 1952, across from the U.S. city of Detroit with the aim of touring the U.S as a trio. Initially they had visa troubles. For a while, Errol Buddle played bassoon in the Windsor Symphony. A chance booking on WXYZ-TV Detroit for Brokensha after being spotted at a Windsor gig led to all three getting visas and regular TV, recording and club work in Detroit. There they met the fourth member of the AJQ, who you hear talking on the Birdland broadcast, Richard J. (Dick) Healey (alto sax, clarinet, flute, bass).

Because what happened next is so detailed, I will quote directly from the Wikipedia article on the AJQ

“Early 1954 appearances on the Detroit WXYZ-TV show “Soupy’s On” led comedian Soupy Sales to recommend the group to a Detroit suburb club owner Ed Sarkesian to accompany jazz vocalist Chris Connor for two weeks at the club (Rouge Lounge in River Rouge, a Detroit suburb) and to have the group perform between each of her sets. Since Buddle had been playing bassoon regularly with the Windsor Symphony, Healey and Rohde quickly decided to make arrangements for the flute-bassoon-vibes combination, giving the group a distinctive sound. This unusual instrumentation created much interest in the quartet, not only from jazz enthusiasts, but also from classical music aficionados. During the two-week engagement with Connor, Sarkesian contacted Joe Glaser of Associated Booking Corporation in New York. Sarkesian named the group The Australian Jazz Quartet/Quintet, and based on a quickly recorded 78 disk, he garnered a five-year contract with ABC and Bethlehem Records for the group. Sarkesian then became the group’s personal manager, which worked out very well because he also soon became a major promoter of jazz concerts and festivals.

Under the new arrangement with ABC the AJQ performed at the Blue Note in Chicago and on a concert in Washington DC. with the Dave Brubeck Quartet, the Modern Jazz Quartet, and Carmen McRae. Soon they began playing at clubs like The Hickory House, Birdland (jazz club), Basin Street, and the Roundtable in New York; the Blue Note, Modern Jazz Room, and Robert’s Show Room in Chicago; Storyville in Boston; Jazz City in Los Angeles; Macumba in San Francisco; Sonny’s Lounge in Denver; Peacock Alley in St. Louis; Rouge Lounge in Detroit; Peps and Blue Note in Philadelphia; Midway Lounge in Pittsburgh; Colonial in Toronto, Ball & Chain in Miami and many others. At many of these clubs the AJQ shared the band stand with well-known groups such as the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Les Brown Orchestra, Johnny Smith Quartet, Bud Shank Quartet, Miles Davis, Pete Jolly Trio, J. J. Johnson, Max Roach-Clifford Brown Quintet, Art Blakey Quintet, Teddy and Marty Napoleon Quartet, Bud Powell Trio, Thelonious Monk, Conte Candoli/Al Cohn Quintet, Ahmad Jamal Trio, Don Shirley Trio, Lee Konitz Quartet, Woody Herman, Billie Holiday and others.

National concert tours took place in 1955–57. In 1955 there was the “Modern Jazz Show” with the Dave Brubeck QuartetGerry Mulligan, and Carmen McRae. In 1956 there was “Music For Moderns” with Count BasieErroll Garner, the Kai Winding Septet, the Chico Hamilton Quintet, and the Gerry Mulligan Quartet. In 1957, there was again “Music For Moderns” with the George Shearing Quintet, the Gerry Mulligan Quintet, Chico Hamilton, Helen MerrillCannonball Adderley, and Miles Davis. These tours included performances at major concert halls, including Carnegie Hall in New York.

The AJQ appeared on several national television shows, the most notable being the Steve Allen Tonight Show, The Dave Garroway Today Show, The Arthur Godfrey Show, In Town Tonight Chicago, and the Ed Mackenzie and Soupy Sales Shows from ABC in Detroit. On the Radio they were heard on CBS’s “Woolworth Hour”, NBC’s “Monitor”, and ABC’s “Parade of the Bands”.

During 1955 to 1958 the AJQ recorded seven albums under the Bethlehem label. The first album, distinguished by its cover illustrated by four side-by-side kangaroos, was a 10″ LP recorded in February 1955 and featured arrangements of eight standard songs. A 12″ version of this album, released in 1956, added three standards and one original song by bassist Jimmy Gannon, who also assisted on the recording. Meanwhile, another album, this one with scores of kangaroos on its cover, was released with 10 songs including two originals, one by Gannon and the other by Healey.

In 1958 the group travelled to Australia for The Australian Concert Tour for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). Also, there were TV and Radio Broadcasts, and, in Melbourne and Sydney, there were concerts with Sammy Davis Jr. These performances were broadcast nationally by the ABC. After the 1958 tour the group members decided to terminate the AJQ and become independent performing and recording artists. However, reunion concerts occurred in Adelaide in 1986 and 1993, and a recording of the 1993 concert was distributed.”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Australian_Jazz_Quartet

errol buddle

ERROL BUDDLE – YOUR PHANTOM DANCER VIDEOS OF THE WEEK!

Your Phantom Dancer ‘Video of the Week’ features Errol Buddle on tenor in a cameo about Sydney jazz club, The El Rocco. Good to see some of the extras at least tried to get ’80s versions of early 1960s short back and sides.

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #305

107.3 2SER Tuesday 27 February 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
1950s Dance Bands on Radio
Theme + Komonoi Ostrow
Lawrence Welk Orchestra
Aragon Ballroom
Ocean Park Ca
KECA ABC LA
1955
South
Chuck Cabot Orchestra
Empire Room
Rice Hotel
CBS Houston
Apr 1953
Show Me The Way To Get Out Of This World (That’s Where Everything Is) + Will You Still Be Mine? (Theme)
Matt Dennis
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Chi-Chi Club
WRCA NBC NYC
13 Jun 1955
Set 2
Bands on 1936 Radio
Theme + I’ve Got Rhythm
Freddy Rich Orchestra
‘Dodge Show’
Radio Transcription
New York City
13 Feb 1936
Christopher Columbus
Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians (voc) Band
‘Ford Show’
WABC CBS NY
14 Apr 1936
Hallelujah
Johnny Green Orchestra
‘Packard Hour’
KFI NBC LA
11 Mar 1936
Set 3
Australian Jazz Quintet
Spring Is Here + The Fire Dance
Australian Jazz Quintet
’All Star Parade of Bands’
Birdland
WRCA NBC NY
1956
You’re My Thrill + Coming Down To Earth
 Carmen McRae
 ’All Star Parade of Bands’
Birdland
WRCA NBC NY
1956
Lullaby of Birdland
 Australian Jazz Quintet
’All Star Parade of Bands’
Birdland
WRCA NBC NY
1956
Set 4
Cocoanut Grove Radio 1933-34
Lady Play Your Mandolin
Vincent Valsanti Orchestra (voc) The Playmates
Cocoanut Grove
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1934
Making Faces At The Man In The Moon
Gus Arnheim Orchestra (voc) Loyce Whiteman
‘Cocoanut Grove’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1931
Dancing With The Daffodils + Sweet and Lovely (theme)
Gus Arnheim Orchestra
Cocoanut Grove
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1931
Set 5
Jazz Tenor Sax Stars On Radio
Too Marvellous For Words
Chu Berry and his Stompy Stevedours
Comm Rec
New York
23 Mar 1937
Body and Soul (theme) + Chant of the Groove
Coleman Hawkins Orchestra
Aircheck
Savoy Ballroom
Harlem
4 Aug 1940
I Cover The Waterfront
Lester Young
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
4 Dec 1948
Long Island Sound
Stan Getz
‘Stars of Modern Jazz’
Carnegie Hall
Voice of America
25 Dec 1949
Set 6
1939 Radio Dance Bands
Way Back In 1939 AD
Gray Gordon Tic-Toc Rhythm Orchestra (voc) Cliff Grass
Radio Transcription
New York City
1939
Concerto for Trumpet
Harry James Orchestra
Chatterbox Club
Mountainside NJ
Aircheck
1940
Scatterbrain
Blue Barron Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
1939
Theme + Over The Waves
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘America Dances’
CBS NY and BBC London
1939
Set 7
Swing on 1943 Radio
Take The A-Train (theme) + Way Low
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Hurricane Restaurant
WJZ NBC Blue
28 Aug 1943
Blackberry Jam
Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra
‘Spotlight Bands’
Columbus OH
Blue Network
19 Nov 1943
T’aint What You Think
Les Brown Orchestra
‘Spotlight Bands’
Miami FL
Blue Network
10 Aug 19435
Jumpin’ Jiminy + Close
Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
Mar 1943
Set 8
1950s – 60s Swing On Radio and TV
One O’Clock Jump (theme) + Blee Blop Blues
Count Basie Orchestra
‘Stars in Jazz’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
14 Jan 1953
Hamp’s Boogie Woogie
Lionel Hampton Orchestra
‘Second Timex All-Star Jazz Concert’
CBS TV
30 Apr 1958
What Is This Thing Called Love + My Funny Valentine
Charlie Shavers Quartet
London House
WBBM CBS Chicago
May 1962

20 Feb 2018 Phantom Dancer – Mechanical TV


In this week’s Phantom Dancer mix there is an obtuse mention of Mechanical TV.  (Hear the show online after the 20 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com)

An announcer from 1930, beginning the WENR Chicago broadcasting day (for two sessions starting 3pm), also mentions a callsign, W9XF Chicago.

That immediately brought to my mind, Mechanical TV. W9XR was a mechanical TV station. What is mechanical TV? Read on…

Here’s a 1926 photo of the person who put mechanical TV to air in the UK. John Logie Baird and I share a striking facial resemblance. Here he is…

Firstly, the Phantom Dancer is presented by authentic 1920s – 1930s singer, Greg Poppleton.

And when I first saw the picture of John Logie Baird above, I was gobsmacked. It was like I was looking at a photo of myself…

 

RADIO SHOW

The Phantom Dancer is your two hour non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV.

You can hear this edition online after the 20 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com

On this week’s Phantom Dancer, you’ll also hear sets of Miles Davis on 1950s radio, Artie Shaw on 1939 radio and trad jazz by Louis Armstrong, Bob Crosby and more from live 1940-50 radio.

 

MECHANICAL TV

Mechanical television uses a mechanical scanning device in a studio to scan a scene and produce the video signal. The receiver, called the televisor, uses similar mechanics to display the transmitted picture.

The mechanical scanning device can be a rotating disk with holes in it or a rotating mirror.

Mechanical TV was used to transmit TV signals from 1925 to 1936. The BBC broadcast a regular mechanical TV service in London. Mechanical TV stations also broadcast in the US, Italy, France, Russia and Japan.

Mechanical TV never produced images of good-enough quality to become popular. The first regular electronic TV service (Fernsender Paul Nipkow) began broadcasting in Berlin in 1935.

After side-by-side testing, the BBC dropped mechanical TV in 1936 for an electronic TV system that lasted into the 1960s.

 

BUILD YOUR OWN TV AND PHONOVISION

A slight adjustment of the rheostats and the picture come in clearly. This photo shows the complete television receiver connected to an ordinary radio set. The picture is seen in the cone.
Science and Invention, November 1928. Volume 16 Number 7. Photo from page 618.

Mechanical TVs we’re offered for sale as ‘build-it-yourself’ home kits.

TV pioneer, John Logie Baird, who produced the BBC’s mechanical TV system, also experimented with colour mechanical TV and ‘Phonovision’.

Phonovision was a graphophone device for recording mechanical TV programs to disc – sort of like a 1920s microgroove videodisc.

A number of these one-sided discs survive. I played a recording of one on The Phantom Dancer way back in 1992.

One from 1928 famously shows a woman’s face in animated conversation. A search in 1993 identified the woman as Mabel Pounsford.

 

WHAT DOES A SHOW LOOK LIKE ON MECHANICAL TV?

Your Phantom Dancer ‘Video of the Week’ shows a working mechanical TV built by ‘TelevisionDk’.

It’s a short sequence showing ‘TelevisionDk’s’ home-built 32-line televisor in action.

Pictures are from the 1963 Eurovision Song Contest. Enjoy…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #304

107.3 2SER Tuesday 20 February 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
1936-39 Radio Dance Bands
Theme + A Shine On Your Shoes
Johnny Green Orchestra (voc) Fred Astaire
‘Packard Hour Election Special’
WEAF NBC Red NY
11 Mar 1936
I Still Love To Kiss You Goodnight
Hal Kemp Orchestra (voc) Bob Allen
‘Chesterfield Time’
KNX CBS LA
24 Dec 1937
Chant of the Jungle + Dipsy Doodle (theme)
Larry Clinton Orchestra
Streets of Paris
International Casino
WEAF NBC Red NY
1938
Set 2
Miles Davis on 1948-57 Radio
Theme + Move
Miles Davis
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
16 May 1953
You Belong To Me, I Belong To You
Miles Davis Nonet (voc)
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
4 Sep 1948
Nature Boy + Close
Miles Davis Quartet
‘ABC Dancing Party’
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
30 Oct 1957
Set 3
Dance Bands on 1940s Radio
I’ve Got A Right To Sing The Blues (theme) + Shine
Jack Teagarden Orchestra
’One Night Stand’
Coral Gables
Weymouth, Mass.
AFRS Re-broadcast
24 Sep 1944
Play, Fiddle, Play!
Jan Garber Orchestra
’One Night Stand’
Palladium Ballroom
Hollywood
AFRS Re-broadcast
25 May 1944
All The Things You Are + Opus No.1
Harry James Orchestra
’Spotlight Bands’
AFRS-Rebroadcast
Aug 1946
Set 4
1930s Radio and TV
Sweeter Than Sweet
Frank Weston Orchestra
WENR and W9XF TV
Great Lakes Broadcasting
Chicago
1930
June In January
Bill Thomas (voc) Valsanti Orchestra
‘Cocoanut Grove’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1933
Walking On Air
Anson Weeks Orchestra (voc) Rhythmsters
Peacock Court
Hotel Mark Hopkins
KGO NBC San Francisco
1932
Set 5
Artie Shaw Swings on 1939 NBC
Nightmare (theme) + You’re Mine, You
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WEAF NBC Red NY
20 Oct 1939
One Foot In The Groove
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WEAF NBC Red NY
19 Oct 1939
Last Two Weeks In July
Artie Shaw Orchestra (voc) Helen Forrest
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WEAF NBC Red NY
21 Oct 1939
Carioca + Nightmare (theme)
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Summer Terrace
Ritz Carlton Hotel
WNAC NBC Red Boston
19 Aug 1939
Set 6
Trad on the Wireless
Head Rag Hop
Romeo Nelson (piano) Tampa Red and Frankie Jason (speech)
Comm Rec
Chicago
23 Apr 1929
Jazz Me Blues
Bob Crosby Bobcats
Blackhawk Restaurant
WGN Mutual Chicago
29 Apr 1940
Someday
Louis Armstrong
‘New Orleans’ Movie Launch
Wintergarden Theatre
WNBC NBC NY
19 Jun 1947
Didn’t He Ramble?
Papa Celestin
‘Dixieland Jambake’
WDSU ABC New Orleans
15 Feb 1950
Set 7
Tommy Dorsey, his Trombone and Orchestra Comedian
I’m Getting Sentimental Over You (theme)
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
400 Restaurant NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
30 Sep 1945
Hawaiian War Chant
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
Palladium Ballroom
KNX CBS LA
26 Nov 1940
Swing High
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 Feb 1945
Not So Quiet, Please
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
‘Raleigh Kool Show’
WJSV CBS Washington DC
18 Aug 1942
Set 8
Latin Influences on 1939 – 1956 Jazz
Vuelva
Cab Calloway Orchestra
Comm Rec
New York City
17 Oct 1939
Frenesi
Fats Waller
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Red Chicago
10 Dec 1940
Mambo The Most
Woody Herman’s Third Herd
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Peony Park
WOW NBC Omaha
1954
Tangorine
Dizzy Gillespie
Birdland
WCBS CBS NY
Jun 1956