10 April New Listen Welcome Phantom Dancer – Symphony Sid, Bop DJ


“Dean took the wheel and drove clear the rest of the way to New York, and we began to hear the Symphony Sid show on the radio with all the latest bop, and now we were entering the great and final city of America.” (Jack Kerouac, On the Road, pt. 3, ch. 11)

Ah yes, we’ll be hearing some of those broadcasts from the ‘all-night, all-frantic one’, Symphony Sid, on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

NEW LISTENER WELCOME DRIVE

2SER is listener supported community radio. It relies on volunteers and your listener subscriptions to stay on air. Hence the Welcome Drive.

Support 2SER NOW. Phone 02 9514 9500 or go online to subscribe or donate

This week you’ll also hear some early rock’n’roll airchecks from the 1950s, Jack Teagarden and his Trad band from Club Hangover over KCBS San Francisco (in particular Saint James Infirmary which has been requested), a set of Martha Tilton singing in front of Benny Goodman’s Orchestra over CBS in January and February 1939 and a whole lot more.

See the full play list below.

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV. It’s made in the studios of 2SER in Sydney. The Phantom Dancer is heard across Australia on stations of the Community Radio Network.

The Phantom Dancer is produced and presented by Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s-style singer and band leader, Greg Poppleton.

Hear this week’s Phantom Dancer (and past Phantom Dancers online) at radio 2ser.com

Greg Poppleton music website.

SYMPHONY SID

Born Sidney Tarnopol, which he shortened to Sid Torin, Symphony Sid was a DJ and bop promoter, credited with introducing bebop to the mass audience. He did this by co-producing ‘modern progressive jazz concerts’, as he called them, from 1945, but mainly through his radio show, the all-night, all-frantic Symphony Sid show.

Symphony Sid introducing Charlie Parker
Symphony Sid introducing Charlie Parker

Listening to many Symphony Sid airchecks, it seemed the show ran on WMCA New York from 1948-49, and then on the flagship New York ABC station, WJZ, until 1953, from midnight to 5pm Saturday and Sunday mornings.

Symphony Sid championed what he called ‘the finest in modern progressive jazz’. And as we’ll hear today, he also championed latin music by Machito and others, and he also hosted gospel radio shows not much later in his career when he moved from New York to Boston. At the end of his radio career in Miami, he was an influential Latin DJ and hosted live latin music on WBUS.

His show was a DJ show, where he’d spin records and listeners could call in Circle 6-2500 (WMCA) or Circle 6-4343 (WJZ), “guess the ‘gone’ side,” and make requests.

Then from 3:03am to 4, the show broadcast live bop (mostly) from The Royal Roost nightclub, and then from Birdland.

Sid would make the live introductions in a ‘flying-by-the-seat-of-his-pants’ style: a little bit dope-addled perhaps, sometimes forgetting names, sometimes covering for time with an impromptu interview, but always conversational and hipster.

Bandleaders who played these early morning shows included Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Tadd Dameron, Dinah Washington, Terry Gibbs, Lester Young, Machito, Charlie Ventura, Dave Brubeck, Chubby Jackson and Slim Gaillard.

Being on the Symphony Sid Show gave huge exposure to musicians. Some wrote tribute songs to him. ‘Jumpin’ With Symphony Sid’, which became his radio theme, was written by Lester Young with lyrics added later by King Pleasure. It was a hit in 1950 for the George Shearing Quintet. Illinois Jacquet wrote ‘Symphony in Sid’. Louis Jordan’s song, ‘After School Swing Session’ had the added title, ‘Swinging With Symphony Sid’.

“[Symphony Sid] is probably the greatest middleman jazz has ever known. A broadcaster for 35 years, once billed as ‘the all-night, all-frantic one’, he was the man to listen to in the forties, fifties and sixties if you wanted to know what was happening in jazz.”— Leslie Gourse, New York Times.

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Your Phantom Dancer Video of the Week is a short aircheck of Symphony Sid introducing the live portion of on eof his 1948 WMCA shows from The Royal Roost. He introduces the Tadd Dameron small group. Enjoy…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #310

107.3 2SER Tuesday 10 April 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
1940s Pop Radio
Theme + I Haven’t Got a Worry in the World
Griff Williams Orchestra
Empire Room
Palmer House
WGN Chicago
5 Mar 1947
Am I Blue? + Taking a Chance on Love
Ethel Waters
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
17 Jul 1945
Twilight Time + Close
Dean Hudson Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Blue Room
Hotel Lincoln
New York City
AFRS Re-broadcast
11 Nov 1944
Set 2
Modern Progressive Jazz on Radio
Ol’ Man BeBop
Dizzy Gillespie Orchestra
AFRS Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1946
No, No, Chi-Chi, No!
Machito (voc) Gracie Graziella and Band
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
1951
Francesca + Artistry in Rhythm (theme)
Stan Kenton Orchestra
‘Concert in Miniature’
Hampton Casino
Hampton Beach NH
WBZ NBC Boston
21 Jul 1953
Set 3
Rock’n’Roll
Open + Straight Life
King Porter
‘Burgie Big Beat’
KNX CBS LA
1956
Ad + But I Don’t Care
Sid King and the Five Strings
KTAE Taylor TX
1955
Flagwaver + Close
Sam ‘The Man’ Taylor Big Band
‘Rock’n’Roll Dance Party’
WCBS CBS NY
24 Jul 1956
Set 4
Jack Teagarden at Club Hangover
Stardust on the Moon + Dear Old Southland
Jack Teagarden
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
7 May 1954
Stomp, Mr Henry Lee
Jack Teagarden
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
17 Apr 1954
Lazy River + I Got a Right to Sing the Blues (theme)
Jack Teagarden
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
30 Apr 1954
Set 5
Martha Tilton Sings with Benny Goodman 1939
Hurry Home
Martha Tilton (voc) Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS NY
3 Jan 1939
Gotta Get Some Shuteye
Martha Tilton (voc) Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS NY
7 Feb 1939
I Have Eyes
Martha Tilton (voc) Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS NY
10 Jan 1939
Sweet Little Headache
Martha Tilton (voc) Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS NY
14 Feb 1939
Set 6
1950s Radio Swing Bands
Blue Flame (theme) + Hollywood Blues
Woody Herman Orchestra
Blue Room
Hotel Roosevelt
WWL CBS New Orleans
1951
Hob Nail Boogie
Count Basie Orchestra
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
31 Aug 1952
Flager’s Drive
Dorsey Brothers’ Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WCBS CBS NY
1 Jan 1956
Summertime
Claude Thornhill Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Steel Pier
Atlantic City NJ
AFRS Re-broadcast
24 Aug 1956
Set 7
Sing-a-long Tunes with Blue Barron
Heart and Soul
Blue Barron Orchestra (voc) Russ Carlyle
Radio Transcription
New York City
1938
You’re The Only Star In My Blue Heaven
Blue Barron Orchestra (voc) Russ Carlyle and the Glee Club
Radio Transcription
New York City
1938
Scatterbrain
Blue Barron Orchestra (voc) Charlie Fisher
Radio Transcription
New York City
1939
You Are My Sunshine
Blue Barron Orchestra (voc) Russ Carlyle
Radio Transcription
New York City
1940
Set 8
Symphony Sid Show
Intro + Blue ‘n’ Boogie
Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
31 Mar 1951
Symphony Sid live ad
Symphony Sid
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
4 Sep 1948
I’m Glad There’s You
Charlie Ventura Group (voc) Jackie Cain
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
7 Nov 1958
Symphony Sid live ad
Symphony Sid
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
18 Sep 1948
How High The Moon
Lester Young (voc) Ella Fitzgerald
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
27 Nov 1948
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3 April 2018 Phantom Dancer. Helen Keller On How The Deaf Heard Radio Music In The 1920s


There’re some rare, rare early jazz radio broadcasts for your listening pleasure on this week’s Phantom Dancer. And below, read an insight from Helen Keller about how radio brought music to the deaf in the 1920s.

The Phantom Dancer is produced and presented by Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s-style singer and band leader, Greg Poppleton.

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV. It’s made in the studios of 2SER in Sydney. The Phantom Dancer is heard across Australia on stations of the Community Radio Network.

Hear this week’s Phantom Dancer (and past Phantom Dancers online) at radio 2ser.com

Greg Poppleton music website.

In this week’s mix, you’ll hear sets of radio broadcasts by Buddy Rich, Benny Goodman over three days in October 1937 and The Andrew Sisters. There’s also a set of WW2 European dance bands from Prague, Moscow and Hilversum. The Prague recording features Andrew Sisters soundalikes, The Allan Sisters (Allanovy Sestry).

But the rare, rare radio comes from January 1929. Four ‘Sunny Meadows Washing Machine Programs’ featuring the Ray Miller Orchestra. These were recorded on five minute 78 rpm discs – six discs to a 30 minute show.

1920s radio set
1920s radio set

And that got me thinking about 1920s radio and how it was perceived. That’s when I found two letters from 1924 and 1926 quoted by Timmy D. Taylor in his paper, ‘Music and the Rise of Radio in 1920s
America: technological imperialism, socialization, and the transformation of intimacy’, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2002.

The two letters come from the very early years of radio as a mass entertainment medium. They both describe how deaf people could ‘hear’ music on the radio.

 

HELEN KELLER REPORTS…

Helen Keller
Helen Keller

The first letter is from the famous deaf and blind social activist, Helen Keller, in 1924.

It is a letter to the Symphony Society of New York and describes her joy at hearing a symphonic concert on WEAF Radio, New York City.

“I have the joy of being able to tell you that, though deaf and blind, I spent a glorious hour last night listening over the radio to Beethoven’s ‘Ninth Symphony.’

I do not mean to say that I ‘heard’ the music in the sense that other people heard it; and I do not know whether I can make you understand how it was possible for me to derive pleasure from the symphony. It was a great
surprise to myself. I had been reading in my magazine for the blind of the happiness that the radio was bringing to the sightless everywhere. I was delighted to know that the blind had gained a new source of enjoyment; but
I did not dream that I could have any part in the joy.

Last night, when the family was listening to your wonderful rendering of the immortal symphony some one suggested that I put my hand on the receiver and see if I could get any of the vibrations. He unscrewed the top, and I lightly touched the sensitive diaphragm. What was my amazement to discover that I could feel, not only the vibrations, but also the impassioned rhythm, the throb and the urge of the music. The intertwined and intermingling vibrations from different instruments enchanted me. I could actually distinguish the cornets, the roll of the drums, deep-toned violas and violins singing in exquisite unison. How the lovely speech of the violins flowed and flowed over the deepest tones of the other instruments! When the human voices leaped up thrilling from the surge of harmony, I recognized them instantly as voices. I felt the chorus grow more exultant, more ecstatic, upcurving swift and flame-like, until my heart almost stood still. The women’s voices seemed an embodiment of all the angelic voices rushing in a harmonious flood of beautiful and inspiring sound. The great chorus throbbed against my Žfingers with poignant pause and flow. Then all the instruments and voices together burst forth—an ocean of heavenly vibration—and died away like winds with the atom is spent, ending in a delicate shower of sweet notes.

Of course, this was not hearing, but I do know that the tones and harmonies conveyed to me moods of great beauty and majesty. I also sensed, or thought I did, the tender sounds of nature that sing into my hand—swaying reeds and
winds and the murmur of streams. I have never been so enraptured before by a multitude of tone-vibrations. As I listened, with darkness and melody, shadow and sound filling all the room, I could not help remembering that the great composer who poured forth such a flood of sweetness into the world was deaf like myself. I marveled
at the power of his quenchless spirit by which out of his pain he wrought such joy for others—and there I sat, feeling with my hand the magniŽficent symphony which broke like a sea upon the silent shores of his soul and mine.

Let me thank you warmly for all the delight which your beautiful music has brought to my household and to me. I want also to thank Station WEAF for the joy they are broadcasting in the world.”

 

JAZZING THE DEAF

The second report about the deaf ‘hearing’ radio in the 1920s comes from ‘Jazzing the deaf by radio’, Popular Radio, March 1926, p. 296.

“This information has been conveyed to Paul Ash, orchestra leader and radio star of KYW in letters from several women who explain that these are the only sounds they have been able to hear and that they enjoy the jazz music although otherwise deaf.

A famous ear specialist of Chicago has become interested in the subject, it is reported, and is conducting a series of tests to determine the possibilities of utilizing this means of ‘bone conduction’ of sound so that those
who have lost normal hearing may through radio have the pleasures of music.

When the unique investigation has been completed the renowned specialist promises the issuance of a report and a test program over the air is to be given with deaf persons asked to ‘listen in’ and to report what they ‘hear’.”

 

VIDEOS OF THE WEEK

Your Phantom Dancer Videos of the Week feature Helen Keller herself.

In the first video, the teacher who taught her to speak, Anne Sullivan (who was blind herself), explains with Helen demonstrating, how Helen learnt to talk after hitherto being dumb as well as deaf and blind. Her first word was ‘it’. Her first sentence, “I am not dumb now.” Be amazed…

And here is a 1919 dramatisation of her childhood. The film is called ‘Deliverance’…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #309

107.3 2SER Tuesday 3 April 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Russ Morgan his Wah-Wah Trombone and his Orchestra
Does Your Heart Beat For Me?
Russ Morgan Orchestra
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1937
Sheik of Araby
Russ Morgan Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
AFRS Re-broadcast
28 Apr 1944
Open Up That Door and Let Me In + So Long (Close)
Russ Morgan Orchestra (voc) Al Jennings
‘One Night Stand’
Garden Room
Hotel Claremont
Berkeley Ca
AFRS Re-broadcast
28 Jun 1945
Set 2
Andrew Sisters on Radio
Open + Atcheson, Topeka and Santa Fe
Andrew Sisters with Raymond Paige Orchestra
‘Kraft Music Hall’
KFI NBC LA
6 Sep 1945
Begin the Beguine
Andrew Sisters with Glenn Miller Orchestra
‘Chesterfield Show’
WABC CBS NY
31 Jan 1940
White Christmas + Jingle Bells Nash Ad + Apple Blossom Time (Close)
Andrew Sisters with Curt Massey and Vic Schoen Orchestra
‘Nash – Kelvinator Show’
KNX CBS Los Angeles
19 Dec 1945
Set 3
Swing from WWII Europe
Poznate lehce nas rytmus
Allanovy Sestry
Comm Rec
Prague
17 Dec 1942
Baron von der Pschek (Bel Mir Bist Du Schoen)
Leonid Utesov
Comm Rec
Moscow
1943
Ja
De Ramblers (voc) Ferry Barendse and Band
Comm Rec
Hilversum
2 Mar 1944
Set 4
Benny Goodman – 3 Days in October 1937
Stardust on the Moon + Dear Old Southland
Benny Goodman Orchestra
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
20 Oct 1937
Where or When + Someday Sweetheart
Benny Goodman Trio and Orchestra
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
20 Oct 1937
Dixieland Band + Goodbye
Benny Goodman Orchestra (voc) Martha Tilton
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WOR Mutual NY
23 Oct 1937
Set 5
Duke Ellington on 1951-53 Radio
VIP’s Boogie
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Aircheck
Coeur d’Alene, Idaho
4 Oct 1953
Things Ain’t What They Used To Be
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WNBC NBC New York
11 Jun 1951
Great Times
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
11 Feb 1951
Just a Sit-in’ and a Rockin’ + Mood Indigo
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Blue Note
WMAQ NBC Chicago
13 Aug 1952
Set 6
Ray Miller on 1929 Radio
Open + Angry
Ray Miller Orchestra
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
I’ll Never Ask For More
Ray Miller Orchestra
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
I Ain’t Got Nobody
Ray Miller Orchestra (voc) Mary Williams
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
Tell Me Who + There’s No Place Like Home (theme)
Ray Miller Orchestra (voc) Bob Nolan
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
25 Jan 1929
Set 7
Bob Crosby 1939 Radio
South Rampart Street Parade
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
27 Jun 1939
Little Rock Getaway
Bob Crosby Orchestra (piano) Joe Sullivan
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
4 Jul 1939
O, You Crazy Moon
Bob Crosby Orchestra (voc) Helen Ward
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
11 Jul 1939
Diga Diga Doo
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
18 Jul 1939
Set 8
Buddy Rich Radio
Rain on the Riff (theme) + Cool Breeze
Buddy Rich Orchestra
‘Spotlight Bands’
Phoenixville PA
Mutual
24 Dec 1945
Nellie’s Nightmare
Buddy Rich Orchestra
Aircheck
New York City
1947
In a Prescribed Manner
Buddy Rich Quintet
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
7 Nov 1958

27 March Phantom Dancer – Bunny Berigan and How Disease Effects Legacy


It never ceases to amaze me how disease can over-shadow the brilliant legacy of a person’s life. How much ‘expert’ blather was there about Stephen Hawking’s motor neurone disease as an excuse to avoid explaining and understanding his discoveries in physics? It’s belittling and disrespectful.

Louis Armstrong’s favourite trumpet player was Bunny Berigan. We’ll be hearing radio broadcasts by Bunny Berigan on this week’s The Phantom Dancer.

Even today, seventy years after his death, he is still considered to have been one of the top trumpet players in jazz.

But what I find additionally interesting is how his legacy has been marred by the alcoholism that affected the inventiveness of his playing in the latter part of his short thirty-three years and which ultimately killed him through cirrhosis of the liver.

On this week’s Phantom Dancer you’ll also hear a set of live vintage radio by Dave Brubeck, Jack Teagarden and women singers with their own radio shows – Lee Wiley, Peggy Lee, Dinah Show and Mildred Bailey.

 

THE PHANTOM DANCER is two hours of non-stop swing and jazz mixed from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV by Greg Poppleton, Australia’s only authentic 1920s-1930s singer www.gregpoppletonmusic.com

Broadcast 12:04pm Tuesdays 107.3 2SER Sydney then over 22 radio stations and online.

HEAR The Phantom Dancer live-streamed and afterwards online on the Radio 2SER website. http://www.2ser.com/phantom-dancer/

HOW DISEASE EFFECTS LEGACY

When jazz musicians talk about Bunny Berigan, his alcoholism always comes up.

‘What might have been had he not drank?’, is usually the most positive musing. But to me, from a music perspective, his illness should have no bearing on his legacy. Surely it’s his trumpet playing and technique that’s important, the music played, the songs composed, the landmark recordings made. Louis Armstrong praised Bunny Berigan’s trumpet sound and jazz ideas both before and after Berigan’s death.

I have known jazz musicians, world-touring, who’ve died after long illnesses. They kept their illnesses private, performing to the very end. Even though everyone knew they were terminally ill, the particulars of their illnesses were never discussed. These musicians had the luxury and the determination to never be defined by their disease. Nowadays, when people talk about them, they talk about their music, the good times and their positive legacy. How they died, their disease, and their substance abuse (in one case) are irrelevancies.

However, other jazz musicians I have known, have had deaths after long, debilitating illnesses during which time it was impossible to perform. Others have died suddenly – a heart attack, an overdose, a bleed. Always, these musicians are discussed in terms of their deaths, their creative life work overshadowed by the fabula of their failing health or their fatal surprise.

I guess it’s easier to talk about sickness and death than music. The musical process is a specialist field. Feeling poorly and falling off the perch is something on which everyone has an expert opinion.

BUNNY BERIGAN…
…was the stage name of Roland Bernard Berigan.

He composed, sang, and most famously was a brilliant trumpet player. Of his compositions, we’ll hear a live recording of one, ‘Chicken and Waffles’, from a live 1936 radio broadcast on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

He was best known for his virtuoso jazz trumpeting. His 1937 classic recording of a song from a flop music, ‘I Can’t Get Started’ (which we’ll also hear in two live 1930s versions on this week’s Phantom Dancer) was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1975. ‘I Can’t Get Started’ was Berigan’s radio theme when he launched his own band in 1937.

Bunny Berigan had learnt violin and trumpet and was playing in local bands by his mid-teens. In 1930 he joined the Hal Kemp Orchestra and soon came to notice. He became a sought-after studio musician in New York as well as playing in the orchestras of Freddy Rich, Freddy Martin, Ben Selvin, Paul Whiteman and Benny Goodman. In fact, Goodman’s manager only got ‘that ace drummer man’ Gene Krupa to join the band by telling him Berigan was already on board.

After leaving Goodman, Berigan began to record regularly under his own name and to back singers such as Bing Crosby, Mildred Bailey, and Billie Holiday. We’ll hear him this week with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in early 1937. His solo on ‘Marie’ became one of his signature performances. We’ll hear a 1940 radio version. And, of course, a critic describing Berigan’s trumpet on the 1940 show had to bring up his alcoholism.

After leaving Goodman, Berigan began to record regularly under his own name and to back singers such as Bing Crosby, Mildred Bailey, and Billie Holiday. We’ll hear him this week with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in early 1937. His solo on ‘Marie’ became one of his signature performances. We’ll hear a 1940 radio version. And, of course, a critic describing Berigan’s trumpet on the 1940 show had to bring up his alcoholism.

MUSICAL ADVICE FROM BERIGAN
And instrumentalists PLEASE TAKE NOTE. There’s nothing more irritating to a singer than an instrumentalist taking too much air during the singer’s solo, or cramping the singer’s freedom of expression by trying to steer the improvisation…

Your Phantom Dancer Bunny Berrigan singing and playing trumpet on ‘Until Today’ with Freddy Rich’s Orchestra in 1936 . Enjoy!

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #308

107.3 2SER Tuesday 20 March 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Swing on 1940s Radio
Theme + Girl of My Dreams
Randy Brooks Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Roseland Ballroom NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
17 Nov 1945
K.C. Caboose + Are You Happy?
John Kirby Sextet
‘One Night Stand’
Aquarium Restaurant NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
18 Jul 1944
They Didn’t Believe Me + Blue Moon (Close)
Eliot Lawrence Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Roseland Ballroom NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
26 Jul 1945
Set 2
Big Bands on 1950s Radio
Theme + I’m Walking
Johnny Richards Orchestra
‘ABC Dancing Party’
Birdland
WABC ABC NYC
1957
If I Had You
Ted Heath Orchestra
‘International Bandstand’
London
NBC/BBC
2 Mar 1959
It’s All In The Game
Ray Anthony Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
AFRS Re-broadcast
1952
Set 3
Bing Crosby Radio
Open + Pistol Packin’ Mama
Bing Crosby
‘Kraft Music Hall’
KFI NBC LA
16 Dec 1943
Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ra
Bing Crosby
’Philco Radio Time’
KECA ABC LA
19 Nov 1947
Ukulele Lady + Green Grow The Lilacs + Close
Bing Crosby + Rosemary Clooney (2nd song)
’Bing Crosby-Rosemary Clooney Show’
KNX CBS LA
19 Oct 1961
Set 4
Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street
Open + Dixieland One-Step
Henry Levine Octet
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
O Sussanah
Diane Courtney
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Cheery-Beery-Bee
The Tune Toppers
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Dangerous Mood
Paul Lavalle Woodwinds
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Set 5
Trombonist Jack Teagarden
Announcer’s Blues
Paul Whiteman Orchestra
‘Paul Whiteman’s Music Varieties’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
19 jan 1936
Mr Jessie
Jack Teagarden Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Chicago
22 Nov 1941
You Took Advantage of Me + Tea For Two + Close
The Three T’s (Jack and Charlie Teagarden and Frank Trambauer)
Hickory House
WEAF NBC Red NY
9 Dec 1936
(1936 Home Recording)
Wolverine Blues + Close
Jack Teagarden Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Chicago
27 Dec 1941
Set 6
Women Singers With Their Own Radio shows
Somebody Loves Me
Peggy Lee
‘Peggy Lee Show’
KNX CBS LA
1947
Beg Your Pardon
Dinah Shore
‘Dinah Shore Show’
KNX CBS LA
4 May 1948
Too Good To Be True
Lee Wiley
‘Lee Wiley Sings’
WABC CBS NY
1 Jul 1936
Summertime
Mildred Bailey
‘Mildred Bailey Show’
WABC CBS NY
12 Jan 1945
Set 7
Bunny Berigan
I Can’t Get Started (theme) + Organ Grinder’s Swing
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
‘Norge Program’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1937
I Can’t Get Started (theme) + Ay, Ay, Ay
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
Manhattan Centre
WNEW NY
26 Sep 1939
Marie
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (Bunny Berigan tp feature)
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WABC CBS NY
9 Mar 1940
Runnin’ Wild + Chicken and Waffles
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
‘Saturday Night Swing Club’
WABC CBS NY
31 Oct 1936
Set 8
Dave Brubeck
This Can’t Be Love
Dave Brubeck
Aircheck
Jan 1954
The Song Is For You
Dave Brubeck
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
Mar 1957
Stardust
Dave Brubeck
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
Dec 1953
All The Things You Are
Dave Brubeck
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
Feb 1956

Penrith March 10 – Greg Poppleton Makes 1920s-30s Pop


Greg Poppleton returned to Penrith to entertain with the songs of the 1920s and 1930s.

The venue was Penrith RSL. Greg Poppleton has been one of the Saturday afternoon jazz bands for the ‘Penrith Jazz Family’ there since 2008.

It’s always lots of fun. I took some movies for you.  And if you enjoy these videos, please give them a thumbs up on YouTube. Thank you.

We’ll be back at Penrith RSL, 8 Tindale St Penrith, Saturday 30 June, 2 – 5pm. Free. Dance floor, bar, bistro and kid friendly. See you there!

Contact and Booking Enquiries

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What’s Happening in Feb-Mar?
Greg Poppleton at Great Art Deco Ball  – SOLD OUT 5 YEARS RUNNING
Blue Mountains 1920s Festival 3 Feb
Builders Club: –  Wollongong 4 Feb
Penrith RSL: –  10 Mar
Jazz at the Pines: –  Dural 18 Mar

 

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Greg Poppleton makes 1920s-1930s POP!

Australia’s only authentic 1920s – 1930s singer with band is available for all events.
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Great Art Deco Ball!

Greg Poppleton and band play their fifth Great Art Deco Ball in the historic Carrington Hotel, Katoomba.

This is the highlight of the annual Blue Mountains 1920s Festival.

Since Greg Poppleton has been the band at the ball, the event sells out earlier and earlier.

Again this year, the $149 tickets (including 3 course meal) were sold out soon after they went on sale (by phoning hotel reception only.)

Here are my two favourite photos from the 2016 and 2017 Balls. Photo credits, ‘Mountain Life’…

Sunday 4 February, Builders’ Club
2:30-5:30. Free
61 Church St, Wollongong
Age 18+ only. FREE.

Greg Poppleton: 1920s-30s vocals
Grahame Conlon: guitar and banjo
Dave Clayton: double bass
(Damon won’t be playing sax because the venue is now 18+)

What’s it like?

THE POPPLETON EFFECT  © Kerrie Foster, Illawarra Breakfast Poets.

“The jazz crowd, they all got excited.
Mr. Poppleton was back in town.
He brought with him first class musicians,
including his son who came down.

This lad of just fourteen was brilliant
and the spitting image of Dad.
The talent will stay in the family.
And I know you’ll agree that’s not bad.

The way that Greg moves round the audience
and picks out whoever he will,
and sings to them through his own megaphone;
you see the crowds get a thrill.

He sings songs from back in the twenties,
and he dresses in clothes from back then.
The consummate entertainer,
we could have him back time and again.

At a TV audition this week
I had my portrait sketched by a young artist

Phantom Dancer Radio Show

I’ve been bringing you the Phantom Dancer on 107.3 2SER Sydney every week since December 1985. It’s your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV. And it’s now heard on 23 radio stations around Australia.

Hear The Phantom Dancer:
Sydney 107.3 2SER Tuesday 12:04 – 2pm
Canberra 92.7 ArtsoundFM Sunday 7 – 7:56pm

You can hear each weekly show online at the radio station 2SER website. And as always, the last hour of The Phantom Dancer is all vinyl.

Here’s this week’s play list…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio Community Radio Network Show CRN #301

107.3 2SER Tuesday 30 January 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program: ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm and early morning on 23 other stations.

Set 1
Glenn Miller and his Legacy
Moonlight Serenade (theme) + Little Brown Jug
Glenn Miller Orchestra
Cafe Rouge Hotel Pennsylvania WJZ NBC Blue NY 23 Nov 1940
Troop Movement + Moonlight Serenade (theme)
Tex Beneke and the Glenn Miller Orchestra
Palladium Ballroom KNX CBS LA 11 Sep 1946
Caribbean Clipper + Close
Ray McKinley and the Glenn Miller Orchestra
‘Guest Star’ Radio Transcription New York City 30 Jun 1957
Set 2
Modern Jazz Radio 1959-60
Rhythm-a-Ning
Thelonius Monk
Connie Mack Park WCAU CBS Philadelphia 3 Mar 1960
So What
Miles Davis
‘Treasury of Song’ Birdland WNBC NBC NY 25 Aug 1959
Flamingo
Rudolfo Alchourron (g)
’Esta es Jazz’ LR1 Radio el Mundo Buenos Aires Argentina 28 May 1960
Set 3
Piano Led Dance Bands
Theme + Amor
Joe Reichman Orchestra
’One Night Stand’ Biltmore Bowl Biltmore Hotel AFRS Re-broadcast Jul 1944
Sunrise Serenade (theme) + Let’s Do It Again
Frankie Carle Orchestra (voc) Band
’Your Saturday Dance Date’ Marine Ballroom Edgewater Beach Hotel WMAQ NBC Chicago 12 Aug 1950
The Doll Dance
Vincent Lopez Orchestra
’One Night Stand’ Grill Room Room Taft Hotel NYC AFRTS Re-broadcast 1959
Set 4
The Outskirts of Trad on Radio
It’s Alright with Me + Hava Nagala
Henry ‘Red’ Allen
London House WBBM CBS Chicago 30 Mar 1962
Slow Blues
Johnny Mercer (voc) Mary Lou Williams (piano) Pee Wee Russell (clarinet)
’Eddie Condon’s Floor Show’ WPIX TV NY 1948
Set 5
Jumping 1944 Radio
Paradise Valley
Andy Kirk and his Clouds of Joy
Aircheck Apollo Theatre NYC 7 Jun 1944
Elk’s Parade
Bobby Sherwood Orchestra
Aircheck Terrace Room NJ 17 Feb 1945
Bangs
Count Basie Orchestra
Blue Room Hotel Lincoln WABC CBS NY 14 Apr 1944
Futurama
Gene Krupa Orchestra
’Spotlight Bands’ Newport RI Blue Network 2 Oct 1944
Set 6
1931-32 Radio
I’ve Got Five Dollars (Theme) + Copenhagen
Friendly Five Orchestra
‘Friendly Five Program’ Radio Transcription New York City 1932
You Could Have Been The One, Baby
Jimmy Grier Orchestra (voc) Loyce Whiteman
Cocoanut Grove Radio Transcription Los Angeles 1932
Take It From Me
Gus Arnheim Orchestra (voc) The Three Ambassadors
Cocoanut Grove Radio Transcription Los Angeles 1931
Egyptian Shimmy
Anson Weeks Orchestra
Peacock Court Hotel Mark Hopkins KGO NBC San Francisco 1932
Set 7
Trumpeter Charlie Spivak on Radio
Charlie Horse
Charlie Spivak Orchestra
Radio Transcription New York City 1941
You Turned The Tables On Me
Charlie Spivak Orchestra (voc) Irene Day
Palladium Ballroom KNX CBS LA 7 Apr 1948
But None Like You
Charlie Spivak Orchestra (voc) Irene Day and Tommy Mercer
Palladium Ballroom KNX CBS LA 7 Apr 1948
Half Past Jumpin’ Time
Charlie Spivak Orchestra
’One Night Stand’ Century Room Commodore Hotel NYC AFRS Re-broadcast 25 Feb 1945
Set 8
Post Swing Alto Sax
Let The Good Times Roll
Louis Jordan (as) Tympani 5
Aircheck Empire Hotel Los Angeles Apr 1949
St Louis Blues
Dave Brubeck Quartet (as) Paul Desmond
’Timex Jazz Show’ WRCA TV NYC 30 Dec 1957
These Foolish Things
Lee Konitz (as)
Storyville Copley Square Hotel WHDH Boston 5 Jan 1954
CONTACT
Management, Tony Jex, OzManagement
0407 941 263
info@ozmanagement.com

How Did The Infamous 1930s Cotton Club Really Sound? Find Out-14 Nov Phantom Dancer Radio Show


Every week, Greg Poppleton brings you The Phantom Dancer – your non-stop two hour mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-1960s radio and TV.

Divided into 8 sets, Greg has been bringing you the Phantom Dancer on 107.3 2SER Sydney since 1985. It’s now heard on 23 radio stations across Australia. You can hear it any time only at 2ser.com

HOW DID THE INFAMOUS 1930s COTTON CLUB REALLY SOUND?

You’ll hear it on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

Set 7, in fact, is an all vinyl mix of Duke Ellington broadcasts from the infamous New York City nightclub where gangsters rubbed shoulders with socialites in a black fantasia.

The air checks are from 1937 and 1938.

This is the nightclub that inspired James Haskin’s novel, The Cotton Club, which in turn formed the basis of the 1984 Francis Ford Coppola 1984 hit crime drama of the same name.

An while Duke Ellington became synonymous with the Harlem nightspot in the late 1930s, it also featured such stars as Cab Calloway, Adelaide Hall, a very young Lena Horne, Fletcher Henderson and pianist/bandleader Dorothy Dandridge.

Started by heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson in 1920 as the Cafe Deluxe, Owney Madden took over the Harlem Club in 1923 on his release from Sing Sing prison.

Seeking rehabilitation through employment, no doubt, the gangster/bootlegger used the club to sell his boutique #1 beer. Though lovingly crafted from premium hops, no doubt, his brewed beverage was nonetheless illegal at the time due to prohibition.

And though the club was located in the black cultural heartland of Harlem, and the talent was all black, presenting ‘authentic black entertainment’, the club was notorious for its brazenly selective door policy, strictly well-off white patrons only.

However, the steep cover charge translated into high fees for the performers.

Ellington, himself, was expected to write ‘jungle music’ for the ‘black exotica’ presented in the form of revues with dancers, comedians and the band.

Meanwhile the club killed many of the smaller black cabarets in Harlem, unable to compete with the lavish Cotton Club shows, their customers discouraged by the flood of white tourists who wanted to try any black club if it couldn’t be the Cotton Club.

At the time of the 1937-38 Duke Ellington broadcasts you’ll hear on today’s Phantom Dancer, the club had moved out of Harlem to Broadway. It was a safer locale for the club’s patrons after the Harlem race riots of 1936.

The Cotton Club’s Broadway opening featured a lavish 130 performer show starring Cab Calloway and dancer Bill ‘Bojangles’ Robinson who was paid the highest ever fee for a performer on Broadway.

In 1940, changing tastes, high rents and a tax evasion investigation closed the Cotton Club’s doors permanently.

Here’s footage 1930s Harlem and the original, famous Cotton Club with Duke Ellington:

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #288

107.3 2SER Tuesday 14 November 2017
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Big Bands on 1950s Radio
Take The A Train (Theme) + Koko
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Town Casino
NBC Cleveland OH
17 Sep 1952
South
Chuck Cabot Orchestra
Empire Room
Rice Hotel
KTRH CBS Houston
Apr 1953
Cry
Ray Anthony Orchestra (voc) Marcie Miller
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Statler
WCBS CBS NY
1952
Set 2
Progressive Jazz on Radio
Instrumental
Miles Davis Nonet
’Symphony Sid Show’
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
4 Sep 1948
Red Pepper Blues
Art Pepper
’Jazz International’
AFRTS Re-broadcast
Hollywood
16 Jun 1960
Perdido
Pete Brown
’Stars in Jazz’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
2 Sep 1952
Set 3
Bing Crosby
Love in Bloom (theme) + Humming, Singing and Whistling
Bob Crosby (voc)Georgie Stoll Orchestra
’Woodbury Program’
KNX CBS Los Angeles
18 Sep 1934
Too Marvelous
Bing Crosby (voc) Buddy Cole Music
’Ford Roadshow’
KNX CBS LA
7 Sep 1957
Blue Skies + When The Blue Of The Night Meets The Gold Of The Day (theme)
Bing Crosby (voc) John Scott Trotter Orchestra
’Philco Show’
KECA ABC LA
30 Oct 1953
Set 4
Accordion Jazz
Japanese Sandman
Rytmin Swing Yhtye
Comm Rec
Helsinki
22 Jan 1948
Theme + It Had To Be You + The Very Thought Of You
Art van Damme Quartet (voc) Louise Carlisle
Radio Transcription
Chicago
1950
Kissa Viekoon (Jeepers Creepers)
Bruno Laako and Lepokot (The Bats)
Comm Rec
Helsinki
1939
Set 5
1st Esquire Jazz Concert
Blues + Esquire Bounce
Louis Armstrong, Jack Teagarden, Coleman Hawkins and more
’1st Esquire Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue New York
Metropolitan Opera House
18 Jan 1944
Rockin’ Chair
Mildred Bailey
’1st Esquire Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue New York
Metropolitan Opera House
18 Jan 1944
Basin Street Blues
Louis Armstrong All-Stars
’1st Esquire Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue New York
Metropolitan Opera House
18 Jan 1944
I’ll Get By
Roy Eldridge (tp) Billie Holliday (voc)
’1st Esquire Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue New York
Metropolitan Opera House
18 Jan 1944
Set 6
1940s Dance Bands on the Air
How Cute Can You Be
Jimmie Grier Orchestra
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1945
A Red Kiss On A Blue Letter
Les Brown Orchestra (voc) Doris Day
Peacock Room
Baker Hotel
CBS Dallas
9 Aug 1945
Sioux Sue
Ray Noble Orchestra
Beverley Wiltshire Hotel
Beverley Hills Ca
KFI NBC LA
4 Feb 1940
It’s Mellow
Glen Gary and the Casa Loma Orchestra
Aircheck
Hotel New Yorker NYC
1944
Set 7
Cotton Club on 1937-38 Radio
Harlem Speaks
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Cotton Club
WOR Mutual NY
18 Mar 1937
Intro + Jig Walk
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Cotton Club
WABC CBS NY
22 May 1938
I’m Slappin’ on Seventh Avenue + Lost in Meditation
Duke Ellington Orchestra (voc) Ivie Anderson
Cotton Club
WABC CBS NY
22 May 1938
The Gal From Harlem + Riding On A Blue Note
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Cotton Club
WABC CBS NY
1 May 1938
Set 8
Lester Young on 1956 Radio
Lullaby of Birdland (theme) + Three Little Words
Lester Young
Birdland
WJZ ABC NYC
5 Sep 1956
Lullaby of Birdland (theme) + Lester Leaps In
Lester Young
Birdland
WJZ ABC NYC
7 Aug 1956

Greg Poppleton 1920s-30s Show, Corrimal Hotel 7 October – Illawarra Jazz Club


Every Saturday, the Illawarra Jazz Club in Wollongong, hosts a jazz band at the Corrimal Hotel on the Princes Highway in Corrimal.

Greg Poppleton and band were invited to play on Saturday 7 October.

The brief was to use as many outstanding young players as possible in a 1920s – 30s quartet who could play in the style.

So the band featured Damon Poppleton (14) on alto sax, Michael Brady (22) on guitarlele and banjo, Jim Elliott bass sax, Adam Barnard on snare, bells, splash cymbal and washboard, and myself singing the songs of the Jazz Age and Swing Era.

What a fun afternoon. It was full house from 3:30 till the show’s end at 6:30pm. And the Jazz Club told me it was the largest turnout in some months.

 

Have us at your place! Visit the band website www.gregpoppletonmusic.com.

Adam Barnard on washboard
Adam Barnard on washboard
Damon Poppleton, alto sax
Damon Poppleton, alto sax
Dancing to Greg Poppleton's 1920s - 1930s jazz and swing
Dancing to Greg Poppleton’s 1920s – 1930s jazz and swing
Michael Brady on the guitarlele doubling banjo
Michael Brady on the guitarlele doubling banjo
Greg Poppleton, authentic 1920s-1930s singer
Greg Poppleton, authentic 1920s-1930s singer
The Greg Poppleton band at Corrimal Hotel
The Greg Poppleton band at Corrimal Hotel
Jim Elliott, bass sax
Jim Elliott, bass sax

Have us at your place! For bookings, visit the band website, www.gregpoppletonmusic.com.