3 April 2018 Phantom Dancer. Helen Keller On How The Deaf Heard Radio Music In The 1920s


There’re some rare, rare early jazz radio broadcasts for your listening pleasure on this week’s Phantom Dancer. And below, read an insight from Helen Keller about how radio brought music to the deaf in the 1920s.

The Phantom Dancer is produced and presented by Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s-style singer and band leader, Greg Poppleton.

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV. It’s made in the studios of 2SER in Sydney. The Phantom Dancer is heard across Australia on stations of the Community Radio Network.

Hear this week’s Phantom Dancer (and past Phantom Dancers online) at radio 2ser.com

Greg Poppleton music website.

In this week’s mix, you’ll hear sets of radio broadcasts by Buddy Rich, Benny Goodman over three days in October 1937 and The Andrew Sisters. There’s also a set of WW2 European dance bands from Prague, Moscow and Hilversum. The Prague recording features Andrew Sisters soundalikes, The Allan Sisters (Allanovy Sestry).

But the rare, rare radio comes from January 1929. Four ‘Sunny Meadows Washing Machine Programs’ featuring the Ray Miller Orchestra. These were recorded on five minute 78 rpm discs – six discs to a 30 minute show.

1920s radio set
1920s radio set

And that got me thinking about 1920s radio and how it was perceived. That’s when I found two letters from 1924 and 1926 quoted by Timmy D. Taylor in his paper, ‘Music and the Rise of Radio in 1920s
America: technological imperialism, socialization, and the transformation of intimacy’, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2002.

The two letters come from the very early years of radio as a mass entertainment medium. They both describe how deaf people could ‘hear’ music on the radio.

 

HELEN KELLER REPORTS…

Helen Keller
Helen Keller

The first letter is from the famous deaf and blind social activist, Helen Keller, in 1924.

It is a letter to the Symphony Society of New York and describes her joy at hearing a symphonic concert on WEAF Radio, New York City.

“I have the joy of being able to tell you that, though deaf and blind, I spent a glorious hour last night listening over the radio to Beethoven’s ‘Ninth Symphony.’

I do not mean to say that I ‘heard’ the music in the sense that other people heard it; and I do not know whether I can make you understand how it was possible for me to derive pleasure from the symphony. It was a great
surprise to myself. I had been reading in my magazine for the blind of the happiness that the radio was bringing to the sightless everywhere. I was delighted to know that the blind had gained a new source of enjoyment; but
I did not dream that I could have any part in the joy.

Last night, when the family was listening to your wonderful rendering of the immortal symphony some one suggested that I put my hand on the receiver and see if I could get any of the vibrations. He unscrewed the top, and I lightly touched the sensitive diaphragm. What was my amazement to discover that I could feel, not only the vibrations, but also the impassioned rhythm, the throb and the urge of the music. The intertwined and intermingling vibrations from different instruments enchanted me. I could actually distinguish the cornets, the roll of the drums, deep-toned violas and violins singing in exquisite unison. How the lovely speech of the violins flowed and flowed over the deepest tones of the other instruments! When the human voices leaped up thrilling from the surge of harmony, I recognized them instantly as voices. I felt the chorus grow more exultant, more ecstatic, upcurving swift and flame-like, until my heart almost stood still. The women’s voices seemed an embodiment of all the angelic voices rushing in a harmonious flood of beautiful and inspiring sound. The great chorus throbbed against my Žfingers with poignant pause and flow. Then all the instruments and voices together burst forth—an ocean of heavenly vibration—and died away like winds with the atom is spent, ending in a delicate shower of sweet notes.

Of course, this was not hearing, but I do know that the tones and harmonies conveyed to me moods of great beauty and majesty. I also sensed, or thought I did, the tender sounds of nature that sing into my hand—swaying reeds and
winds and the murmur of streams. I have never been so enraptured before by a multitude of tone-vibrations. As I listened, with darkness and melody, shadow and sound filling all the room, I could not help remembering that the great composer who poured forth such a flood of sweetness into the world was deaf like myself. I marveled
at the power of his quenchless spirit by which out of his pain he wrought such joy for others—and there I sat, feeling with my hand the magniŽficent symphony which broke like a sea upon the silent shores of his soul and mine.

Let me thank you warmly for all the delight which your beautiful music has brought to my household and to me. I want also to thank Station WEAF for the joy they are broadcasting in the world.”

 

JAZZING THE DEAF

The second report about the deaf ‘hearing’ radio in the 1920s comes from ‘Jazzing the deaf by radio’, Popular Radio, March 1926, p. 296.

“This information has been conveyed to Paul Ash, orchestra leader and radio star of KYW in letters from several women who explain that these are the only sounds they have been able to hear and that they enjoy the jazz music although otherwise deaf.

A famous ear specialist of Chicago has become interested in the subject, it is reported, and is conducting a series of tests to determine the possibilities of utilizing this means of ‘bone conduction’ of sound so that those
who have lost normal hearing may through radio have the pleasures of music.

When the unique investigation has been completed the renowned specialist promises the issuance of a report and a test program over the air is to be given with deaf persons asked to ‘listen in’ and to report what they ‘hear’.”

 

VIDEOS OF THE WEEK

Your Phantom Dancer Videos of the Week feature Helen Keller herself.

In the first video, the teacher who taught her to speak, Anne Sullivan (who was blind herself), explains with Helen demonstrating, how Helen learnt to talk after hitherto being dumb as well as deaf and blind. Her first word was ‘it’. Her first sentence, “I am not dumb now.” Be amazed…

And here is a 1919 dramatisation of her childhood. The film is called ‘Deliverance’…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #309

107.3 2SER Tuesday 3 April 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Russ Morgan his Wah-Wah Trombone and his Orchestra
Does Your Heart Beat For Me?
Russ Morgan Orchestra
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1937
Sheik of Araby
Russ Morgan Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
AFRS Re-broadcast
28 Apr 1944
Open Up That Door and Let Me In + So Long (Close)
Russ Morgan Orchestra (voc) Al Jennings
‘One Night Stand’
Garden Room
Hotel Claremont
Berkeley Ca
AFRS Re-broadcast
28 Jun 1945
Set 2
Andrew Sisters on Radio
Open + Atcheson, Topeka and Santa Fe
Andrew Sisters with Raymond Paige Orchestra
‘Kraft Music Hall’
KFI NBC LA
6 Sep 1945
Begin the Beguine
Andrew Sisters with Glenn Miller Orchestra
‘Chesterfield Show’
WABC CBS NY
31 Jan 1940
White Christmas + Jingle Bells Nash Ad + Apple Blossom Time (Close)
Andrew Sisters with Curt Massey and Vic Schoen Orchestra
‘Nash – Kelvinator Show’
KNX CBS Los Angeles
19 Dec 1945
Set 3
Swing from WWII Europe
Poznate lehce nas rytmus
Allanovy Sestry
Comm Rec
Prague
17 Dec 1942
Baron von der Pschek (Bel Mir Bist Du Schoen)
Leonid Utesov
Comm Rec
Moscow
1943
Ja
De Ramblers (voc) Ferry Barendse and Band
Comm Rec
Hilversum
2 Mar 1944
Set 4
Benny Goodman – 3 Days in October 1937
Stardust on the Moon + Dear Old Southland
Benny Goodman Orchestra
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
20 Oct 1937
Where or When + Someday Sweetheart
Benny Goodman Trio and Orchestra
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
20 Oct 1937
Dixieland Band + Goodbye
Benny Goodman Orchestra (voc) Martha Tilton
Manhattan Room
Hotel Pennsylvania
WOR Mutual NY
23 Oct 1937
Set 5
Duke Ellington on 1951-53 Radio
VIP’s Boogie
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Aircheck
Coeur d’Alene, Idaho
4 Oct 1953
Things Ain’t What They Used To Be
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WNBC NBC New York
11 Jun 1951
Great Times
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
11 Feb 1951
Just a Sit-in’ and a Rockin’ + Mood Indigo
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Blue Note
WMAQ NBC Chicago
13 Aug 1952
Set 6
Ray Miller on 1929 Radio
Open + Angry
Ray Miller Orchestra
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
I’ll Never Ask For More
Ray Miller Orchestra
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
I Ain’t Got Nobody
Ray Miller Orchestra (voc) Mary Williams
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
18 Jan 1929
Tell Me Who + There’s No Place Like Home (theme)
Ray Miller Orchestra (voc) Bob Nolan
‘Sunny Meadows Program’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
25 Jan 1929
Set 7
Bob Crosby 1939 Radio
South Rampart Street Parade
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
27 Jun 1939
Little Rock Getaway
Bob Crosby Orchestra (piano) Joe Sullivan
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
4 Jul 1939
O, You Crazy Moon
Bob Crosby Orchestra (voc) Helen Ward
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
11 Jul 1939
Diga Diga Doo
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York City
18 Jul 1939
Set 8
Buddy Rich Radio
Rain on the Riff (theme) + Cool Breeze
Buddy Rich Orchestra
‘Spotlight Bands’
Phoenixville PA
Mutual
24 Dec 1945
Nellie’s Nightmare
Buddy Rich Orchestra
Aircheck
New York City
1947
In a Prescribed Manner
Buddy Rich Quintet
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
7 Nov 1958
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27 March Phantom Dancer – Bunny Berigan and How Disease Effects Legacy


It never ceases to amaze me how disease can over-shadow the brilliant legacy of a person’s life. How much ‘expert’ blather was there about Stephen Hawking’s motor neurone disease as an excuse to avoid explaining and understanding his discoveries in physics? It’s belittling and disrespectful.

Louis Armstrong’s favourite trumpet player was Bunny Berigan. We’ll be hearing radio broadcasts by Bunny Berigan on this week’s The Phantom Dancer.

Even today, seventy years after his death, he is still considered to have been one of the top trumpet players in jazz.

But what I find additionally interesting is how his legacy has been marred by the alcoholism that affected the inventiveness of his playing in the latter part of his short thirty-three years and which ultimately killed him through cirrhosis of the liver.

On this week’s Phantom Dancer you’ll also hear a set of live vintage radio by Dave Brubeck, Jack Teagarden and women singers with their own radio shows – Lee Wiley, Peggy Lee, Dinah Show and Mildred Bailey.

 

THE PHANTOM DANCER is two hours of non-stop swing and jazz mixed from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV by Greg Poppleton, Australia’s only authentic 1920s-1930s singer www.gregpoppletonmusic.com

Broadcast 12:04pm Tuesdays 107.3 2SER Sydney then over 22 radio stations and online.

HEAR The Phantom Dancer live-streamed and afterwards online on the Radio 2SER website. http://www.2ser.com/phantom-dancer/

HOW DISEASE EFFECTS LEGACY

When jazz musicians talk about Bunny Berigan, his alcoholism always comes up.

‘What might have been had he not drank?’, is usually the most positive musing. But to me, from a music perspective, his illness should have no bearing on his legacy. Surely it’s his trumpet playing and technique that’s important, the music played, the songs composed, the landmark recordings made. Louis Armstrong praised Bunny Berigan’s trumpet sound and jazz ideas both before and after Berigan’s death.

I have known jazz musicians, world-touring, who’ve died after long illnesses. They kept their illnesses private, performing to the very end. Even though everyone knew they were terminally ill, the particulars of their illnesses were never discussed. These musicians had the luxury and the determination to never be defined by their disease. Nowadays, when people talk about them, they talk about their music, the good times and their positive legacy. How they died, their disease, and their substance abuse (in one case) are irrelevancies.

However, other jazz musicians I have known, have had deaths after long, debilitating illnesses during which time it was impossible to perform. Others have died suddenly – a heart attack, an overdose, a bleed. Always, these musicians are discussed in terms of their deaths, their creative life work overshadowed by the fabula of their failing health or their fatal surprise.

I guess it’s easier to talk about sickness and death than music. The musical process is a specialist field. Feeling poorly and falling off the perch is something on which everyone has an expert opinion.

BUNNY BERIGAN…
…was the stage name of Roland Bernard Berigan.

He composed, sang, and most famously was a brilliant trumpet player. Of his compositions, we’ll hear a live recording of one, ‘Chicken and Waffles’, from a live 1936 radio broadcast on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

He was best known for his virtuoso jazz trumpeting. His 1937 classic recording of a song from a flop music, ‘I Can’t Get Started’ (which we’ll also hear in two live 1930s versions on this week’s Phantom Dancer) was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1975. ‘I Can’t Get Started’ was Berigan’s radio theme when he launched his own band in 1937.

Bunny Berigan had learnt violin and trumpet and was playing in local bands by his mid-teens. In 1930 he joined the Hal Kemp Orchestra and soon came to notice. He became a sought-after studio musician in New York as well as playing in the orchestras of Freddy Rich, Freddy Martin, Ben Selvin, Paul Whiteman and Benny Goodman. In fact, Goodman’s manager only got ‘that ace drummer man’ Gene Krupa to join the band by telling him Berigan was already on board.

After leaving Goodman, Berigan began to record regularly under his own name and to back singers such as Bing Crosby, Mildred Bailey, and Billie Holiday. We’ll hear him this week with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in early 1937. His solo on ‘Marie’ became one of his signature performances. We’ll hear a 1940 radio version. And, of course, a critic describing Berigan’s trumpet on the 1940 show had to bring up his alcoholism.

After leaving Goodman, Berigan began to record regularly under his own name and to back singers such as Bing Crosby, Mildred Bailey, and Billie Holiday. We’ll hear him this week with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in early 1937. His solo on ‘Marie’ became one of his signature performances. We’ll hear a 1940 radio version. And, of course, a critic describing Berigan’s trumpet on the 1940 show had to bring up his alcoholism.

MUSICAL ADVICE FROM BERIGAN
And instrumentalists PLEASE TAKE NOTE. There’s nothing more irritating to a singer than an instrumentalist taking too much air during the singer’s solo, or cramping the singer’s freedom of expression by trying to steer the improvisation…

Your Phantom Dancer Bunny Berrigan singing and playing trumpet on ‘Until Today’ with Freddy Rich’s Orchestra in 1936 . Enjoy!

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #308

107.3 2SER Tuesday 20 March 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Swing on 1940s Radio
Theme + Girl of My Dreams
Randy Brooks Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Roseland Ballroom NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
17 Nov 1945
K.C. Caboose + Are You Happy?
John Kirby Sextet
‘One Night Stand’
Aquarium Restaurant NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
18 Jul 1944
They Didn’t Believe Me + Blue Moon (Close)
Eliot Lawrence Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Roseland Ballroom NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
26 Jul 1945
Set 2
Big Bands on 1950s Radio
Theme + I’m Walking
Johnny Richards Orchestra
‘ABC Dancing Party’
Birdland
WABC ABC NYC
1957
If I Had You
Ted Heath Orchestra
‘International Bandstand’
London
NBC/BBC
2 Mar 1959
It’s All In The Game
Ray Anthony Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
AFRS Re-broadcast
1952
Set 3
Bing Crosby Radio
Open + Pistol Packin’ Mama
Bing Crosby
‘Kraft Music Hall’
KFI NBC LA
16 Dec 1943
Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ra
Bing Crosby
’Philco Radio Time’
KECA ABC LA
19 Nov 1947
Ukulele Lady + Green Grow The Lilacs + Close
Bing Crosby + Rosemary Clooney (2nd song)
’Bing Crosby-Rosemary Clooney Show’
KNX CBS LA
19 Oct 1961
Set 4
Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street
Open + Dixieland One-Step
Henry Levine Octet
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
O Sussanah
Diane Courtney
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Cheery-Beery-Bee
The Tune Toppers
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Dangerous Mood
Paul Lavalle Woodwinds
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Set 5
Trombonist Jack Teagarden
Announcer’s Blues
Paul Whiteman Orchestra
‘Paul Whiteman’s Music Varieties’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
19 jan 1936
Mr Jessie
Jack Teagarden Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Chicago
22 Nov 1941
You Took Advantage of Me + Tea For Two + Close
The Three T’s (Jack and Charlie Teagarden and Frank Trambauer)
Hickory House
WEAF NBC Red NY
9 Dec 1936
(1936 Home Recording)
Wolverine Blues + Close
Jack Teagarden Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Chicago
27 Dec 1941
Set 6
Women Singers With Their Own Radio shows
Somebody Loves Me
Peggy Lee
‘Peggy Lee Show’
KNX CBS LA
1947
Beg Your Pardon
Dinah Shore
‘Dinah Shore Show’
KNX CBS LA
4 May 1948
Too Good To Be True
Lee Wiley
‘Lee Wiley Sings’
WABC CBS NY
1 Jul 1936
Summertime
Mildred Bailey
‘Mildred Bailey Show’
WABC CBS NY
12 Jan 1945
Set 7
Bunny Berigan
I Can’t Get Started (theme) + Organ Grinder’s Swing
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
‘Norge Program’
Radio Transcription
New York City
1937
I Can’t Get Started (theme) + Ay, Ay, Ay
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
Manhattan Centre
WNEW NY
26 Sep 1939
Marie
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (Bunny Berigan tp feature)
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WABC CBS NY
9 Mar 1940
Runnin’ Wild + Chicken and Waffles
Bunny Berigan Orchestra
‘Saturday Night Swing Club’
WABC CBS NY
31 Oct 1936
Set 8
Dave Brubeck
This Can’t Be Love
Dave Brubeck
Aircheck
Jan 1954
The Song Is For You
Dave Brubeck
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
Mar 1957
Stardust
Dave Brubeck
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
Dec 1953
All The Things You Are
Dave Brubeck
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
Feb 1956

20 March 2018 Phantom Dancer – Miff Mole Pioneer 1920s Jazz Trombonist


Miff Mole was a trombone player who became famous in the jazz world of the 1920s. And we’ll be hearing radio broadcasts by Miff on this week’s The Phantom Dancer.

The Phantom Dancer is two hours of non-stop swing and jazz mixed from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV.

Now in its 33rd year, The Phantom Dancer is produced and presented by Greg Poppleton, Australia’s only authentic 1920s-1930s singer.

On this week’s Phantom Dancer you’ll also hear a set of live vintage radio by Nat King Cole, Marion Hutton and Charlie Spivak.

Broadcast 12:04pm Tuesdays 107.3 2SER Sydney then over 22 radio stations and online.

HEAR The Phantom Dancer live-streamed then online on the Radio 2SER website.

 

MIFF MOLE…

…was the stage name of Irving Milfred Mole (March 11, 1898 – April 29, 1961).

He was a jazz trombonist and band leader. He created ‘the first distinctive and influential solo jazz trombone style.’

Miff Mole’s soloing style had rapid-fire cadenzas, octave-leaps and shakes. He was a big influence on later trombonists Bill Rank, Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, and Jimmy Harrison.

His heyday was the mid-1920s when he recorded popular and critically acclaimed records with such stars as Sophie Tucker (Red Hot Mama (1924)) and Bix Beiderbecke (Davenport Blues (1925)).

Miff Mole studied classical violin and piano as a child. He picked up the trombone age 15. He was playing professionally by 1920 and went on to play in some of the greatest New York City bands in the Jazz Age.

TROMBONE

Miff Mole played in the Original Memphis Five (1922), and with Ross Gorman, Roger Wolfe Kahn, Sam Lanin, Ray Miller and many others. With cornetist Red Nichols, he led Miff Mole and His Little Molers, recording from 1926 – 1930.

Miff Mole waxed sides with a lot of Red Nichols ‘aggregations’: The Red Heads, The Hottentots, The Charleston Chasers, The Six Hottentots, The Cotton Pickers, Red and Miff’s Stompers, and Red Nichols and His Five Pennies.

But Miff’s style became ‘old-hat’ when Jack Teagarden arrived in New York in 1928. Teagarden brought a more legato, blues-oriented approach to jazz.

After the 1920s, Miff Mole took to radio as an NBC studio musician until 1938 when he joined Paul Whiteman’s orchestra. By then, even Mole had been influenced by Teagarden. He was in Benny Goodman’s orchestra from 1942-43 and led various dixieland bands, one of which we hear on today’s Phantom Dancer – his Nixieland Six – from 1942-47. He worked in Chicago in 1947–54 when bad health reduced the amount of playing he did. He died in 1961.

Miff Mole’s records have been used in the soundtracks of two twenty-first century movies.

His 1928 recording of ‘Shim-Me-Sha-Wabble’ with the Little Molers was used in Russell Crowe;s movie, Cinderella Man.

His composition ‘There’ll Come a Time (Wait and See)’, is heard in the Academy Award-nominated movie, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

Your Phantom Dancer Miff Mole Video of the Week – Miff Mole hanging out on a hotel rooftop in 1943. Enjoy!

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #308

107.3 2SER Tuesday 20 March 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
The Lesser Known 1940s Dance Bands
Straighten Up and Fly Right (theme) + Sunday + Ad + Wildroot Creme Oil Song
Nat King Cole Trio (voc) NCK
‘King Cole Trio Time’
KFI NBC LA
6 Mar 1948
Open + Little Joe From Chicago (theme) + Boogie a la King
Nat King Cole Trio (voc) NCK
Radio Transcription
1959
Go Bongo + Close
Nat King Cole Trio (bongos) Jack Costanza
‘Just Jazz’
Shrine Auditorium LA
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
Set 2
1950s Modern Jazz Radio
Leap Frog (Theme) + At Sundown
Les Brown Orchestra
‘Treasury Bandstand’
Hershey Park Ballroom
WLAN ABC Lancaster PA
1957
Always
Kai Winding
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
2 Sep 1952
Perdido
Ray Anthony Orchestra
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
25 Dec 1952
Set 3
Hot Music on 1930-32 Radio
Coca Cola Waltz (theme) + So Sympathetic
Leonard Joy and the Coca Cola Orchestra
‘Coca Cola Top Notchers’
WEEI NBC Boston
26 Mar 1930
Bugle Call Rag
George Olsen Music
’Lucky Strike Orchestra’
WEAF NBC Red NY
1 Dec 1932
Whistling in the Dark + Sweet and Lovely (close)
Gus Arnheim Orchestra
’Cocoanut Grove’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1931
Set 4
Pop Singers 1950s-60s Radio
Open + Baby, I Want It
Frankie Laine
‘Navy Star Time’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1952
Cheek to Cheek
Rosemary Clooney
‘Bing Crosby Show’
KNX CNS LA
19 Oct 1960
I Get a Kick Out of You + Period (close)
Sarah Vaughan
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
21 Apr 1952
Set 5
Marion Hutton sings on 1938-39 Radio
Oh, Johnny, Oh!
Glenn Miller Orchestra (voc) Marion Hutton
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WJZ NBC Blue NY
5 Dec 1939
The Jumping’ Jive
Glenn Miller Orchestra (voc) Marion Hutton
NBC Radio
Baltimore
5 Sep 1939
I Just Got a Letter
Glenn Miller Orchestra (voc) Marion Hutton
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WJZ NBC Blue NY
6 Dec 1939
In a Russian Foxhole
Glenn Miller Orchestra (voc) Marion Hutton
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WJZ NBC Blue NY
18 Apr 1939
Set 6
Charlie Spivak on 1940s Radio
After I Say I’m Sorry
Charlie Spivak Orchestra (voc) The Stardusters including Marion’s sister June
Radio Transcription
New York City
1941
Stomping Room Only
Charlie Spivak Orchestra
Palladium Ballroom
KNX CBS Hollywood
4 Apr 1948
20 May 1940
Besume Mucho
Charlie Spivak Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Century Room
Commodore Hotel NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
1944
Massenet’s Elegy
Charlie Spivak Orchestra
Palladium Ballroom
KNX CBS Hollywood
Apr 1948
20 May 1940
Set 7
Miff Mole
Davenport Blues
Red and Miff’s Stompers
Comm Rec
New York City
11 Feb 1927
Peg o’ My Heart
Miff Mole Nixieland Six
‘For The Record’
WEAF NBC NY
30 Oct 1944
Nobody’s Sweetheart
Irving Mill’s Hotsy Totsy Gang (tb) Miff Mole
‘Brunswick Brevities’
WABC CBS NY
Oct 1928
Waiting For The Evening Whistle + Bugle Call Rag
Eddie Condon Group (tb) Miff Mole
‘Eddie Condon Jazz Concert’
Town Hall
WJZ Blue NY
30 Sep 1944
Set 8
Charlie Barnet
Makin’ Whoopee
Charlie Barnet Orchestra
Casino Gardens
Ocean Park Ca
KECA ABC LA
Dec 1946
Come To Baby Do
Charlie Barnet Orchestra (voc) Lena Horne
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
1945
Strolling
Charlie Barnet Orchestra
Aircheck
Dec 1945
Dear Old Southland + Close
Charlie Barnet Orchestra
‘Spotlight Bands’
Ft Devon, Mass
Blue Network
15 Oct 1945

6 March Phantom Dancer – Hans Albers, The German John Wayne and a Clown Called Quick.


The Phantom Dancer is presented by authentic 1920s – 30s singer, Greg Poppleton..

The Phantom Dancer, goes to the movies this week. In one of the vinyl sets in the last hour, you’ll hear movie songs hits by 1930s-40s German film star, Hans Albers. (You’ll also hear sets of Raymond Scott, Louis Armstrong and Woody Herman from live 1940s radio)

Hear the mix after the 27 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com

Why Hans Albers?

I am in the process of memorising the German lyrics for ‘La Paloma’. La Paloma is probably the most recorded Spanish song in history. It has become a quasi-folk song in many cultures. Written by Sebastián Yradier as a contradanza (the progenitor of danzon, mambo and cha cha cha), it was published in Madrid in 1859 as a ‘Cancion Americana con acompañamiento de Piano’.

The lyrics I’m learning are those sung by Hans Albers in the 1943 film ‘Grosse Freiheit Nr 7’. This is one of three films in the Nazi era that celebrated the individual rather than fascist corporatist ideas.

Also in this week’s Phantom Dancer we’ll hear a set of swing from live 1936 radio. Other sets are dedicated to 1940s dance orchestras and there’s two sets of music radio from the 1950s.

 

HANS PHILIPP AUGUST ALBERS…

…was one of the most popular German actors, and singers, of the twentieth century.

He was an actor in theatre and in more than a hundred silent films.

He then starred in the first German talkie Die Nacht gehört uns (The Night is Ours) in 1929. He was the big-mouthed strong man Mazeppa alongside Marlene Dietrich in her star-making film Der blaue Engel (The Blue Angel) in 1930.

Albers himself hit stardom that same year in the movie, The Copper.

In 1932 he starred in my favourite Albers film, ‘Quick’ in which he plays two roles, one being an English vaudeville clown, speaking German in an English accent.

Many of Albers’ movie songs became huge hits. We’ll hear four of them today on The Phantom Dancer, including ‘Gnaedige Frau komm’ und spiel’ mid mir’ from ‘Quick’. In the film he sings the song after sliding down a giant banjo on a theatre stage, then flying around the theatre until he lands on one of the balconies to serenade his lady love.

Although Albers became Germany’s most popular actor under the Nazi regime, he never supported the Nazis. He instead supported his Jewish girlfriend Hansi Berg. She left for Switzerland, then England in 1939, with Hans Albers continuing to financially support her until they reunited after the war. They stayed together until his death.

Nevertheless, he continued to star in major films during the war in ‘hero’ roles. After 1945, when the occupation powers didn’t want German heroes in German films, he was typecast in wise-aged-man roles.

He remained active in film and theatre until three months before his death due to alcohol related disease in 1960.

TWO PHANTOM DANCER VIDEOS OF THE WEEK!

Your Phantom Dancer ‘Video of the Week’ #1 shows Hans Albers as the singing hero in living Agfacolour.

It’s the song, La Paloma, from the 1943 movie, Grosse Freiheit Nr7. Enjoy…

Your Phantom Dancer ‘Video of the Week’ #2 shows Hans Albers as vaudeville clown, Quick.

It’s the song, La Paloma, from the 1943 movie, Grosse Freiheit Nr7. Enjoy…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #306

107.3 2SER Tuesday 6 March 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Woody Herman Orchestra and Vocals on 1940s Radio
Blue Flame (Theme) + I’m Going To See My Baby
Woody Herman Orchestra (voc) WH
‘One Night Stand’
Empire Room
Rice Hotel
Houston
1955
There, I Said It Again
Woody Herman Orchestra (voc) WH
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
21 Jul 1945
I Ain’t Got Nothin’ But The Blues + Blue Flame (theme)
Woody Herman Orchestra (voc) WH
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WABC CBS NY
21 Aug 1944
Set 2
Club Hangover
Relaxin’ At The Trouro (Theme) + Sensation Rag
Muggsy Spanier
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
20 Nov 1954
Riverside Blues
Muggsy Spanier
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
20 Nov 1954
Royal Garden Blues + I’ve Got A Right To Sing The Blues (theme)
Jack Teagarden
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
17 Apr 1954
Set 3
Dance Bands on 1940s Radio
Theme + Octave Jump
Bob Chester Orchestra
’One Night Stand’
College Inn
Hotel Sherman, Chicago
AFRS Re-broadcast
8 Oct 1944
Personality + I’m Getting Sentimental Over You (theme)
Sy Oliver Orchestra (voc) Buddy Moreno
’Endorsed By Dorsey’
WOR Mutual NY
3 Mar 1946
With My Head In The Clouds + Lady Be Good
Glenn Miller AAF Orchestra (voc) Johnny Desmond and the Modernaires
’Uncle Sam Presents’
WEAF NBC NY
12 Feb 1944
Set 4
Frank Sinatra on Your Hit Parade 1943-44
I’ve Heard That Song Before
Frank Sinatra
‘Your Hit Parade’ (Dress Rehearsal)
WEAF NBC NY
27 Feb 1943
I’ll Be Seeing You
Frank Sinatra
‘Your Hit Parade’
WEAF NBC NY
26 Aug 1944
I Love You + Theme
Frank Sinatra
‘Your Hit Parade’
WEAF NBC NY
6 May 1944
Set 5
Hans Albers 1930s movie Hits
Hoppla, jets komm’ ich
Hans Albers
Movie: ‘Der Sieger’ 1932
La Paloma
Hans Albers
Movie: Grosse Freiheit Nr7, 1943
Gnaedige Frau, komm’ und spiel’ mit mir
Hans Albers
Movie: ‘Quick’, 1932
Goodbye Jonny
Hans Albers
Movie: Wasser fuer Canitoga 1939
Set 6
Raymond Scott on the Air
I’ll Be Around
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
1944
Blues Theme
Raymond Scott ‘The Captivators’
WABC CBS NY
10 Jan 1943
In A Magic Garden
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Rose Room
Palace Hotel
KQW CBS San Francisco
Apr 1944
Four Beat Shuffle + Pretty Little Petticoat (theme)
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Red Chicago
1940
Set 7
Hit Of The Week Cardboard Records
You Bought a New Kind of Love to Me
Don Vorhees Orchestra (tp either Red Nichols or Bob Effros)(voc) Dick Robertson
‘Hit of the Week’ Record
New York City
Aug 1930
Cheer Up – Ballyhoo
Phil Spitalny Music (voc) Eddie Cantor (v) Joe Venuti (tp) Bob Effros
‘Hit of the Week’ Record
New York City
Oct 1931
I’ll Be Blue
Hit of the Week Orchestra (tp) Manny Klein (voc) Dick Robertson
‘Hit of the Week’ Record
New York City
Nov 1930
Reaching For The Moon
Sam Lanin Orchestra (voc) Scrappy Lambert
‘Hit of the Week’ Record
New York City
Mar 1931
Set 8
Louis Armstrong On 1943-44 Radio
Brother Bill
Louis Armstrong Orchestra (voc) LA
‘Spotlight Bands’
Geiger Field
Blue Network
1943
If I Could Be With You (One Hour Tonight)
Louis Armstrong Orchestra (voc) LA
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
1943
Lazy River
Louis Armstrong Orchestra (voc) LA
‘Spotlight Bands’
Dallas TX
Blue Network
17 Aug 1943
It Had To Be You + Close
Louis Armstrong Orchestra (voc) LA
‘Spotlight Bands’
Tuskagee, Alabama
Blue Network
5 Oct 1944

20 Feb 2018 Phantom Dancer – Mechanical TV


In this week’s Phantom Dancer mix there is an obtuse mention of Mechanical TV.  (Hear the show online after the 20 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com)

An announcer from 1930, beginning the WENR Chicago broadcasting day (for two sessions starting 3pm), also mentions a callsign, W9XF Chicago.

That immediately brought to my mind, Mechanical TV. W9XR was a mechanical TV station. What is mechanical TV? Read on…

Here’s a 1926 photo of the person who put mechanical TV to air in the UK. John Logie Baird and I share a striking facial resemblance. Here he is…

Firstly, the Phantom Dancer is presented by authentic 1920s – 1930s singer, Greg Poppleton.

And when I first saw the picture of John Logie Baird above, I was gobsmacked. It was like I was looking at a photo of myself…

 

RADIO SHOW

The Phantom Dancer is your two hour non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV.

You can hear this edition online after the 20 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com

On this week’s Phantom Dancer, you’ll also hear sets of Miles Davis on 1950s radio, Artie Shaw on 1939 radio and trad jazz by Louis Armstrong, Bob Crosby and more from live 1940-50 radio.

 

MECHANICAL TV

Mechanical television uses a mechanical scanning device in a studio to scan a scene and produce the video signal. The receiver, called the televisor, uses similar mechanics to display the transmitted picture.

The mechanical scanning device can be a rotating disk with holes in it or a rotating mirror.

Mechanical TV was used to transmit TV signals from 1925 to 1936. The BBC broadcast a regular mechanical TV service in London. Mechanical TV stations also broadcast in the US, Italy, France, Russia and Japan.

Mechanical TV never produced images of good-enough quality to become popular. The first regular electronic TV service (Fernsender Paul Nipkow) began broadcasting in Berlin in 1935.

After side-by-side testing, the BBC dropped mechanical TV in 1936 for an electronic TV system that lasted into the 1960s.

 

BUILD YOUR OWN TV AND PHONOVISION

A slight adjustment of the rheostats and the picture come in clearly. This photo shows the complete television receiver connected to an ordinary radio set. The picture is seen in the cone.
Science and Invention, November 1928. Volume 16 Number 7. Photo from page 618.

Mechanical TVs we’re offered for sale as ‘build-it-yourself’ home kits.

TV pioneer, John Logie Baird, who produced the BBC’s mechanical TV system, also experimented with colour mechanical TV and ‘Phonovision’.

Phonovision was a graphophone device for recording mechanical TV programs to disc – sort of like a 1920s microgroove videodisc.

A number of these one-sided discs survive. I played a recording of one on The Phantom Dancer way back in 1992.

One from 1928 famously shows a woman’s face in animated conversation. A search in 1993 identified the woman as Mabel Pounsford.

 

WHAT DOES A SHOW LOOK LIKE ON MECHANICAL TV?

Your Phantom Dancer ‘Video of the Week’ shows a working mechanical TV built by ‘TelevisionDk’.

It’s a short sequence showing ‘TelevisionDk’s’ home-built 32-line televisor in action.

Pictures are from the 1963 Eurovision Song Contest. Enjoy…

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #304

107.3 2SER Tuesday 20 February 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
1936-39 Radio Dance Bands
Theme + A Shine On Your Shoes
Johnny Green Orchestra (voc) Fred Astaire
‘Packard Hour Election Special’
WEAF NBC Red NY
11 Mar 1936
I Still Love To Kiss You Goodnight
Hal Kemp Orchestra (voc) Bob Allen
‘Chesterfield Time’
KNX CBS LA
24 Dec 1937
Chant of the Jungle + Dipsy Doodle (theme)
Larry Clinton Orchestra
Streets of Paris
International Casino
WEAF NBC Red NY
1938
Set 2
Miles Davis on 1948-57 Radio
Theme + Move
Miles Davis
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
16 May 1953
You Belong To Me, I Belong To You
Miles Davis Nonet (voc)
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
4 Sep 1948
Nature Boy + Close
Miles Davis Quartet
‘ABC Dancing Party’
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
30 Oct 1957
Set 3
Dance Bands on 1940s Radio
I’ve Got A Right To Sing The Blues (theme) + Shine
Jack Teagarden Orchestra
’One Night Stand’
Coral Gables
Weymouth, Mass.
AFRS Re-broadcast
24 Sep 1944
Play, Fiddle, Play!
Jan Garber Orchestra
’One Night Stand’
Palladium Ballroom
Hollywood
AFRS Re-broadcast
25 May 1944
All The Things You Are + Opus No.1
Harry James Orchestra
’Spotlight Bands’
AFRS-Rebroadcast
Aug 1946
Set 4
1930s Radio and TV
Sweeter Than Sweet
Frank Weston Orchestra
WENR and W9XF TV
Great Lakes Broadcasting
Chicago
1930
June In January
Bill Thomas (voc) Valsanti Orchestra
‘Cocoanut Grove’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1933
Walking On Air
Anson Weeks Orchestra (voc) Rhythmsters
Peacock Court
Hotel Mark Hopkins
KGO NBC San Francisco
1932
Set 5
Artie Shaw Swings on 1939 NBC
Nightmare (theme) + You’re Mine, You
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WEAF NBC Red NY
20 Oct 1939
One Foot In The Groove
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WEAF NBC Red NY
19 Oct 1939
Last Two Weeks In July
Artie Shaw Orchestra (voc) Helen Forrest
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WEAF NBC Red NY
21 Oct 1939
Carioca + Nightmare (theme)
Artie Shaw Orchestra
Summer Terrace
Ritz Carlton Hotel
WNAC NBC Red Boston
19 Aug 1939
Set 6
Trad on the Wireless
Head Rag Hop
Romeo Nelson (piano) Tampa Red and Frankie Jason (speech)
Comm Rec
Chicago
23 Apr 1929
Jazz Me Blues
Bob Crosby Bobcats
Blackhawk Restaurant
WGN Mutual Chicago
29 Apr 1940
Someday
Louis Armstrong
‘New Orleans’ Movie Launch
Wintergarden Theatre
WNBC NBC NY
19 Jun 1947
Didn’t He Ramble?
Papa Celestin
‘Dixieland Jambake’
WDSU ABC New Orleans
15 Feb 1950
Set 7
Tommy Dorsey, his Trombone and Orchestra Comedian
I’m Getting Sentimental Over You (theme)
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
400 Restaurant NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
30 Sep 1945
Hawaiian War Chant
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
Palladium Ballroom
KNX CBS LA
26 Nov 1940
Swing High
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 Feb 1945
Not So Quiet, Please
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
‘Raleigh Kool Show’
WJSV CBS Washington DC
18 Aug 1942
Set 8
Latin Influences on 1939 – 1956 Jazz
Vuelva
Cab Calloway Orchestra
Comm Rec
New York City
17 Oct 1939
Frenesi
Fats Waller
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Red Chicago
10 Dec 1940
Mambo The Most
Woody Herman’s Third Herd
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Peony Park
WOW NBC Omaha
1954
Tangorine
Dizzy Gillespie
Birdland
WCBS CBS NY
Jun 1956

13 February Phantom Dancer – Pioneer African-American Singer And Stand-up


Pioneer African-American stand-up comedian, Timmie Rogers, is the focus of this week’s, The Phantom Dancer.

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop two hour mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV.

It’s been presented by 1920s-1930s singer and band leader, Greg Poppleton, since 1985.

Hear this show online for the next 4 weeks after the 13 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com

On this week’s Phantom Dancer we hear the stars of jazz on Eddie Condon’s 1948 TV ‘Floorshow’. There’s a set of Benny Goodman from 1934-36 radio. And we visit ‘The Supper Club’, an NBC radio show, in 1944-45. The Birdland audience sing ‘Happy Birthday’ to Billy Eckstine live on 1953 radio.

Plus, as mentioned, we hear Timmie Rogers, in live 1945-49 radio appearances. And there’s a bonus live Nat King Cole treatment of a Timmie Rogers song, broadcast from The Trocadero in Hollywood in 1945.

 

TIMMIE ROGERS

US comedian, band leader, singer, composer and actor, Timmie Rogers, was one of the first black comedians who directly addressed a white audience when he worked.

Before Rogers, African-American comedians had to either work in pairs or groups, talking only to each other while playing characters – think Mr Gallagher  and Mr Sheen.

In fact, Timmie Rogers began in vaudeville in 1932 with a partner, Freddie, doing a dance act.

 

STAND-UP PIONEER

He went his own way in 1944 and was an immediate success on radio. Today’s Phantom Dancer features some of Timmie Rogers early radio solo work.

Rogers had been dancing since age 8. He ran away from home at 12 working as a dishwasher. He learnt the languages he heard in the kitchens. He eventually could speak nine languages. He sang in French and German.

While working cleaning ashtrays in a ballroom, absorbed which what was happening on stage, he was invited to dance between acts. That was the beginning of his career in entertainment. First he was a dancer and singer. Then his main focus became stand-up, specialising in the topical and political.

FIRST TV SHOW 1949

In 1949, Rogers starred in the first black prime-time show on US TV (CBS), Uptown Jubilee.

 

OH, YEAH!

Rogers was known as the Unknown Pioneer of (Black) Comedy. His catchphrase was “Oh Yeah!”, which you’ll hear plenty of times in today’s Phantom dancer Timmie Rogers set and in The Phantom dancer Video of the Week below.

He was a recurring guest star on The Jackie Gleason Show for over 12 years. He ended up working with Gleason thirty years.

Rogers also a composer and lyricist. You’ll hear his song, ‘If You Can’t Smile and Say Yes’, sung by Nat King Cole in a live 1945 radio broadcast. He wrote songs for Carmen McRae and Sarah Vaughan. His hits included ‘Back to School Again’ and ‘I Love Ya, I Love Ya, I Love Ya’.

 

1961 TV APPEARANCE

On your Phantom Dancer Video of the Week, enjoy Timmie Rogers as he wins over the studio audience on a 1961 TV Variety Show,

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #303

107.3 2SER Tuesday 13 February 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Benny Goodman 1934-36
Music Hall Rag
Benny Goodman Orchestra
Comm Rec
New York City
1934
Dixieland Band
Benny Goodman Orchestra (voc) Helen Ward
‘Let’s Dance’
WEAF NBC Red NY
4 May 1935
King Porter Stomp + Goodbye (theme)
Benny Goodman Orchestra
Joseph Urban Room
Congress Hotel
NBC Chicago
3 February 1936
Set 2
Exotica on the Wireless
Theme + Tweedle Dee Tweedle Dum
Sauter and Finegan
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Blue Note
WMAQ NBC Chicago
12 Sep 1953
Goodnight For A Murder
George Barnes
‘The Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY via Chicago
8 Sep 1941
Mocambo Mambo
Martin Denny Orchestra
London House
WBBM CBS Chicago
1959
Set 3
NBC Supper Club
I May Be Wrong
Jo Stafford
’Supper Club’
NBC/AFRS
10 Apr 1946
On The Atcheson, Topeka and Santa Fe
The Satisfiers
’Supper Club’
NBC/AFRS
1945
The Brave Volunteer + Smoke Gets In Your Eyes
Jo Stafford
’Supper Club’
NBC/AFRS
1950
Set 4
Progressive Jazz Singers
I Didn’t Sleep A Wink Last Night
Arthur Prysock
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
9 Sep 1952
Ain’t Misbehavin’
Anita O’Day (voc) Nat King Cole Trio
‘King Cole Court’
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1959
Happy Birthday + Send My Baby Back To Me
Billy Eckstine
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
8 Jul 1953
Set 5
Jazz on 1948-49 TV with Eddie Condon
Fascinating Rhythm / I Got a Crush On You / ‘S Wonderful / They Can’t Take That Away From Me / The Man I Love / Embraceable You / I Got Rhythm
Eddie Condon Group
‘Eddie Condon Floor Show’
WNBT TV NY
9 Jul 1949
I Cover The Waterfront
Sarah Vaughan
‘Eddie Condon Floor Show’
WPIX TV NY
13 Dec 1948
Look At Me Now
June Christy
‘Eddie Condon Floor Show’
WNBT TV NY
23 Jul 1949
Blues
Eddie Condon Group
‘Eddie Condon Floor Show’
WPIX TV NY
13 Dec 1948
Set 6
1930s Small Groups
Sweet Heartache
Valaida Snow
Comm Rec
London
9 Jul 1937
Deep Purple
Benny Goodman Quartet
‘Camel Caravan’
WCAU CBS Philadelphia
14 Feb 1939
Theme + Hold My Hand
Fats Waller
WEAF NBC Red NY
16 Jul 1938
Gin Mill Blues + Close
Bob Crosby
‘Swing Concert’
Congress Hotel
WMAQ NBC Red Chicago
18 May 1937
Set 7
Timmie Rogers Comedian
Good Deal
Timmie Rogers
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
1946
Stand-Up
Timmie Rogers
Apollo Theatre
New York City
17 Aug 1950
Daddy-O
Timmie Rogers
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
1946
The Trouble With Me Is You
Nat King Cole (composed by Timmie Rogers)
Trocadero
KHJ Mutual LA
26 Apr 1945
Set 8
1940s-50s ‘Modern Jazz’
Twilight in Teheran
Buck Ram All-Stars
Comm Rec
New York City
18 Sep 1944
Intro + I’m In A Dancing Mood
Dave Brubeck Quartet
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
Mar 1957
Ain’t You A Mess
Stan Getz
Red Hill Inn
Pennsauken
WCBS CBS NY
18 May 1957
Dizzy’s Business
Dizzy Gillespie
Birdland
WCBS CBS NY
Jun 1956

6 February 2018 Phantom Dancer – Yes! Serious Music Can Be Entertaining. Proof.


The Phantom Dancer, presented by 1920s-1930s singer and band leader, Greg Poppleton, since 1985, is your non-stop two hour mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s – 1960s radio and TV.

This week, you’ll hear 8 sets including folk singer Susan Reed, dixieland by Kid Ory and Turk Murphy, a set of vocal harmonists including The King Sisters, a set hit songs by Woody Herman and Count Basie from the Avadon Ballroom – all from live radio broadcasts, of course.

You can hear this show online for the next 4 weeks after the 6 Feb broadcast at radio 2ser.com

BLACK, BROWN AND BEIGE

Duke Ellington’s longest and most ambitious orchestral work is heard in part on today’s Phantom Dancer.

From an April 1945 WJZ NYC ‘Date With The Duke’ broadcast out of the 400 Club in New York City we’ll hear live, Work Song and Spiritual.

Duke Ellington introduced it in his first concert at Carnegie Hall, January 23, 1943. He wrote it as “a parallel to the history of the Negro in America.”

It was first performed as a preview at Rye High School in Westchester County, New York, the day before its premiere at Carnegie Hall.

Another performance at Boston’s Symphony Hall on January 28 are the only known performances of the complete work.

Thereafter, Duke Ellington only performed pieces of it, as we’ll hear on today’s Phantom Dancer.

Following ‘Black, Brown and Beige’ on the Armed Forces Radio Service re-broadcast disc, Joya Sherill singing the pop ditty, ‘Accentuate The Positive’. Something of a statement by the AFRS editor, I’m suspect.

The first movement, ‘Black’, is divided into three parts, the Work Song, the spiritual Come Sunday , and Light.

‘Brown’ has three parts, West Indian Dance or Influence; Emancipation Celebration, and The Blues.

‘Beige’ covers “the Afro-American of the 1920s, 30s and World War II,” wrote Leonard Feather in the liner notes of the 1977 release of the original 1943 performance.

Duke Ellington mentions his Carnegie Hall performance of ‘Black, Brown and Beige’ in an interview with Frank Sinatra before playing Solitude at the piano on this week’s Phantom Dancer Video of the Week. A scratchy ‘Songs By Sinatra’ radio broadcast from 1943. He’s then joined by Raymond Scott and the CBS Radio Orchestra.

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #302

107.3 2SER Tuesday 6 February 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Dance Bands on One Night Stand
Theme + Kentucky
Gay Claridge Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Chez Paree
Chicago
AFRS Re-broadcast
21 Aug 1944
Laura
Tony Pastor Orchestra (voc) Dick Dyer
‘One Night Stand’
Hollywood Palladium
CBS/AFRS Re-broadcast
15 May 1945
Saturday Night Is The Lonliest Night Of The Week + Sweet Dreams Sweetheart
Freddy Martin Orchestra (voc) The Martin Men and Artie Wayne
‘One Night Stand’
Cocoanut Grove
Ambassador Hotel LA
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 January 1945
Set 2
Susan Reed Folk Singer
The Continental
Harry Sosnik and the Savings Bonds Orchestra
‘Guest Star’
Radio Transcription
NYC
7 Dec 1947
The Soldier and the Lady / Turtle Dove / Danny Boy
Susan Reed – Zither, Irish Harp, ‘the Everloving’
‘Guest Star’
Radio Transcription
NYC
7 Dec 1947
Two Guitars + Close
Harry Sosnik and the Savings Bonds Orchestra
’’Guest Star’
Radio Transcription
NYC
7 Dec 1947
Set 3
A Date With The Duke
Working Song ‘Black, Brown and Beige’ Suite
Duke Ellington Orchestra
’A Date With The Duke’
400 Restaurant
WJZ Blue NYC
30 Apr 1945
Spiritual ‘Black, Brown and Beige’ Suite
Duke Ellington Orchestra
’A Date With The Duke’
400 Restaurant
WJZ Blue NYC
30 Apr 1945
Accentuate The Positive
Duke Ellington Orchestra (voc) Joya Sherill
’A Date With The Duke’
400 Restaurant
WJZ Blue NYC
30 Apr 1945
Set 4
Stars For Defence
Theme + You ‘Ol Son-of-a-Gun + Love Look Away
Rosemary Clooney (voc) Buddy Cole Music
‘Stars for Defence’
Radio Transcription
8 Feb 1959
Civil Defence
Leo A Hoig
‘Stars for Defence’
Radio Transcription
8 Feb 1959
Two Little Girls + Always Together + Close
Rosemary Clooney (voc) Buddy Cole Music
‘Stars for Defence’
Radio Transcription
8 Feb 1959
Set 5
Harmony on 1930s-40s Radio
People Will Say We’re In Love
Nillsen Twins (voc) Spike Jones City Slickers
Aircheck
1944
A Stairway To The Stars
The Inkspots
WFIL NBC Red
Philadelphia
12 Jul 1939
Everybody Loves My Baby
King Sisters
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1947
Chi-Baba Chi-Baba
Herman McCoy and The Hamp Tones (voc) Lionel Hampton Orchestra
Casa Mañana
Culver City CA
KFI NBC LA
20 Jul 1947
Set 6
Woody Herman Hits
Open + Apple Honey
Woody Herman Orchestra (Gene Krupa opens)
‘Timex All-Star Jazz Show’
NBC TV
New York City
30 Dec 1957
Woodchoppers’ Ball
Woody Herman’s Third Herd
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
WOW NBC Omaha
1954
Four Brothers
Woody Herman Orchestra
Blue Room
Roosevelt Hotel
WWL CBS New Orleans
10 Nov 1951
Golden Wedding
Woody Herman Orchestra (drums) Dave Tough
‘One Night Stand’
AFRS Re-broadcast
Oct 1944
Set 7
Turk Murphy and Kid Try On KCBS Radio
Bay City (theme) + Down Home Rag
Turk Murphy
Easy Street
KCBS San Francisco
2 Dec 1958
St James Infirmary
Kid Ory
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
10 Oct 1954
Sadie Green, The Vamp of New Orleans
Turk Murphy
Easy Street
KCBS San Francisco
9 Dec 1958
Milneburg Joys + Close
Kid Ory
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
30 Oct 1954
Set 8
Count Basie at the Avadon
Hobnail Boogie
Count Basie Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Avadon Ballroom
Los Angeles
AFRS Re-broadcast
1946
Lazy Lady Blues
Count Basie Orchestra (voc) Jimmie Rushing
‘One Night Stand’
Avadon Ballroom
Los Angeles
AFRS Re-broadcast
1946
Andy’s Blues
Count Basie Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Avadon Ballroom
Los Angeles
AFRS Re-broadcast
1946