MC For The Centenary Of Recorded Jazz Ball


2017 is the official Centenary of Recorded Jazz. The first jazz record was recorded and released in 1917 (though there is a contender from 1916 called “That Funny Jas Band from Dixieland”.)

Jazz promoter Robert Scheltema de Heere re-booked me to MC his 100 years of jazz on record concert. I had MC’d his Jazz Band Ball last year.

I also sang the 1920s classic, ‘Cake Walkin’ Babies From Home’, with Geoff Power’s Classic Jazz Band.

The concert was held in the majestic Art Deco Petersham Town Hall in Sydney. Petersham Town Hall was built in 1937-38  in the Inter-War Stripped Classical Style. Similar buildings in the style include Finland's parliament house. The concert was held in the majestic Art Deco Petersham Town Hall in Sydney.
Petersham Town Hall was built in 1937-38  in the Inter-War Stripped Classical Style. Similar buildings in the style include the Finnish parliament building in Helsinki.

Petersham Town Hall's largely intact Art Deco interiors has made it a popular filming location for film and television. Scenes for Baz Luhrmann's breakout film, Strictly Ballroom, were shot here in 1992Petersham Town Hall’s largely intact Art Deco interiors has made it a popular film and movie location. Scenes for Baz Luhrmann’s breakout film, Strictly Ballroom, were shot here in 1992.

Here I'm posing in the foyer with the 'All About Swing' swing dance troupe. I'm standing next to one of the school's principals, Siobhan FordHere I’m posing in the foyer with the ‘All About Swing’ swing dance troupe. I’m standing next to one of the school’s principals, Siobhan Ford (in dark blue).

 

Backstage with All About Swing (Greg Poppleton L and Matt Adami R)Backstage with All About Swing as they warm-up. (Greg Poppleton L and co-principal, Matt Adami R)

The night opened with Geoff Power's Classic Jazz Band. For the last number of their set I sang 'Cake Walking Babies From Home' as All About Swing swirled and glided across the large dance floor.The night opened with Geoff Power’s Classic Jazz Band. For the last number of their set I sang ‘Cake Walking Babies From Home’ before introducing Paul Furniss’ Licorice All-Sorts.

Waiting backstage to announce the duelling pianos of international stars Simon Tedeschi and Kevin Hunt.A photo of the stage I took while waiting in the wings, ready to introduce the duelling jazz pianos of international stars Simon Tedeschi and Kevin Hunt.

CONTACT

Greg Poppleton is Australia’s only authentic 1920s – 1930s singer. Greg and his band play for festivals, clubs and bars as well as all private functions.

To find out more, please visit Greg’s website: www.gregpoppletonmusic.com

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What Was I Doing With The Band At Sydney Bus Museum?


Greg Poppleton provided the hi-octane musical atmosphere with a selection of bouncy 1920s – 30s tunes sung by Australia’s only authentic 1920s-1930s singer.

Entertaining, energetic and engaging, Greg and the band were the focus of plenty of happy snaps by nostalgic bus fans. We’ve even appeared on a few Facebook pages since.

Greg can entertain for you, too. Duo to full 1920s Orchestra. Act now.

Enjoy this selection of photos of the night taken by Greg Poppleton, a visitor, and DJ/dancer Swingin’ Kitten

Greg Poppleton 1920s-30s Band. Geoff Power sousaphone doubling trumpet, Paul Baker banjo, Greg Poppleton 1920s-30s singer, Damon Poppleton alto sax.
Greg Poppleton 1920s-30s Band in front of a 1930 Sydney bus. Geoff Power sousaphone doubling trumpet, Paul Baker banjo, Greg Poppleton 1920s-30s singer, Damon Poppleton alto sax. Photo by Swingin’ Kitten.

 

Greg Poppleton sings 'Margie' from the front platform of a 1970 Atlantean double decker. Photo by Swingin' Kitten.
Greg Poppleton sings ‘Margie’ from the front platform of a 1970 Atlantean double decker. Photo by Swingin’ Kitten.

 

1920s-30s singer Greg Poppleton with Limpin' Jimmy and Swingin' Kitten, swing and rockabilly DJs.
1920s-30s singer Greg Poppleton with Limpin’ Jimmy and Swingin’ Kitten, swing and rockabilly DJs.

 

Greg Poppleton singing into a visitor’s camera with Damon on alto sax. Photo by Swingin’ Kitten

 

Damon and Dad on the way home after the gig in the back of an old Atlantean bus
Damon and Dad on the way home after the gig in the back of an old Atlantean bus

Remember, Greg can entertain for you, too. Duo to full 1920s Orchestra. Act now.

Do Song Covers Violate Copyright? 21 Nov Phantom Dancer


Thirty-two years on air, heard on 23 radio stations and online, Greg Poppleton is Australia’s longest running swing DJ and Australia’s only authentic 1920s – 1930s singer.

Every week he brings you The Phantom Dancer, a live, multi-award-winning non-stop mix of swing and jazz sourced from real 1920s-1960s radio broadcasts.

In Greg’s eight Phantom Dancer sets this week we hear Bop takes of old songs on live 1947-51 radio, Duke Ellington from his 1945 ABC ‘Date with the Duke’ series, 1930s German dance bands playing the hits from the movies, and a set of R’n’B singers live over CBS radio’s Al Freed Rock’n’Roll Dance Party in 1956.Al Freed Show

And the R’n’B set brings me to this question…

DO SONG COVERS VIOLATE COPYRIGHT?

Why does the R’n’B set bring me to this question? Because two of the singers we’ll be hearing on today’s Phantom Dancer from live 1956 radio had copyright run-ins with a big band/pop singer who also happened to be on today’s show (in Set 2), Georgia Gibbs.

The first R’n’B singer you’ll hear on today’s Phantom Dancer (and all the singers were backed in these ‘Rock’n’Roll Dance Party’ radio broadcasts by the Count Basie Orchestra) is LaVerne Baker.

LAVERN BAKER – TWEEDLEE DEE RIP OFFLaVern Baker
Born Delores LaVern Baker, LaVern Baker had several hit records in the 1950s. Her most successful disc was “Tweedlee Dee” (1955) which you’ll here her sing live today. This latin tempo song was LaVern’s first hit. It got to 4 on the R&B chart and 14 on the national US pop chart. Meanwhile, singer Georgia Gibbs recorded a note-for-note cover of the song that reached number 1. A real kick in the guts that made LaVern ask the question,

“Does this Song Cover violate my copyright?”

She made an unsuccessful attempt to sue Gibbs. She unsuccessfully petitioned the US Government to consider such covers copyright violations.

ETTA JAMES – DANCE WITH ME HENRY GRAB Etta Jamse
Born Jamesetta Hawkins, Etta started learning to sing at age five. Her singing teacher used to punch her in the chest while she sang to force her voice to come from her diaphragm. She developed an unusually strong voice.

Los Angeles big band leader, Johnny Otis, saw 14 year old Etta singing with a Doo-wop group and booked her to sing his “answer song” to Hank Ballard’s “Work with Me, Annie”. He even gave her co-credit as lyricist. The song was “Dance with Me, Henry”, which and you’ll hear Etta singing it live on today’s Phantom Dancer. But again, Georgia Gibbs recorded a cover that took a lot of the thunder. It was a version called “The Wallflower” and it reached number one on the Billboard Top 100. This made Etta very angry.
Her intellectual property had been appropriated.

FAYE ADAMSFaye Adams
Faye Adams’ father was a gospel singer and at age five she joined her sisters to sing spirituals, regularly performing on local radio shows. She, too, had a big voice, billed as, “Atomic Adams’.

Her first hit, “Shake a Hand”, topped the US Billboard R’n’B chart for ten weeks in 1953 and hit 22 on the US pop chart, selling one million copies and receiving a gold disc.

In 1954, Adams had two more R&B chart toppers. The one she sings on today’s Phantom Dancer, live over CBS in 1956, is “I’ll Be True”. This song was then covered by Bill Haley and later by Jackie DeShannon.
Covering a song is much different to appropriating a song. All cool, because the original composer/lyricist is acknowledged and compensated. I’ll explain about the legalities of song covers below.

IVORY JOE HUNTER
Ivory Joe Hunter

He’s the final R’n’B singer in today’s Phantom Dancer set of 1956 rock’n’roll radio. He’d had hits on the R’n’B charts since the mid 1940s and was billed as The Baron of the Boogie and The Happiest Man Alive. Maybe he was happy because no-one was copying his songs while they were still climbing the charts. On today’s Phantom Dancer he sings his 1950 R’n’B chart-topper, “I Almost Lost My Mind”, live, of course, and with the Count Basie Orchestra.

Now, to the legalities of covering a song, quoted directly from the Australian Performing Rights Association (APRA) website…

A BAND IS PERFORMING MY SONGS. CAN THEY DO THIS WITHOUT MY PERMISSION?
Yes, in most cases they can. The venue in which the band plays must hold an APRA licence; it is not the responsibility of the individual bands. The APRA licence gives the venue a blanket licence to authorise the performance of all copyright music.

DO I NEED A LICENCE?
Yes. You may need to obtain an AMCOS licence if you want to make a recording of a song composed by another writer.

WHAT ABOUT UPLOADING COVER VERSIONS TO DIGITAL SERVICE PROVIDERS?
If you are recording a cover version of a work and wish to make it available on a US-based digital service provider (iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify etc), you are required to take out a licence with the Harry Fox Agency (AMCOS equivalent in the USA). Go to www.harryfox.com/license_music/ and head to their Songfile Mechanical Licensing tool. In cases where the Harry Fox Agency do not represent the work, you may be able to obtain a compulsory licence via RightsFlow – see www.rightsflow.com and head to the Limelight licensing area.

IN AUSTRALIA?
As long as you’ve first obtained a manufacturing licence from AMCOS, you can supply your recording to a digital service provider (DSP) such as iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify etc. APRA AMCOS licenses DSPs directly, and so royalties for downloads will be collected by APRA AMCOS on behalf of the rights holders.

I hope this has been of help to you, with a bit of R’n’B history thrown in. Oh, and for more R’n’B history, check out this YouTube footage of LaVern Baker as your Phantom Dancer Video of the Week. Enjoy!

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #289

107.3 2SER Tuesday 21 November 2017
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Swing Bands on One Night STand
Theme + Lady Be Good
Lucky Millinder Orchestra
’One Night Stand’
Savoy Ballroom NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
10 Jul 1945
Cherry
Sonny Durham Orchestra (voc) Howard Walters
’One Night Stand’
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
AFRS Re-broadcast
14 Apr 1944
Texas Polka + Isle of Capri
Gay Claridge Orchestra (eg) Mary Osbourne
’One Night Stand’
Chez Parée
Chicago
AFRS Re-broadcast
21 Aug 1945
Set 2
Popular Radio Singers
Choo Choo Polka
Paul Whiteman Orchestra (voc) Georgia Gibbs and Merry Macs
’Georgia Gibbs Show’
Blue Network
22 Jul 1945
Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered
Margaret Whiting
’Oxydol Show’
CBS
1950
Basin Street Blues + Close
Martha Tilton and Curt Massey
’Alka-Seltzer Show’
CBS
17 Jun 1949
Set 3
A Date With The Duke
Take The A-Train (theme) + Chelsea Bridge
Duke Ellington Orchestra
’A Date With The Duke’
WJZ ABC NYC Re-broadcast
30 Jul 1945
Frustration
Duke Ellington Orchestra (bari sax) Harry Carney
’A Date With The Duke’
WJZ ABC NYC Re-broadcast
30 Jul 1945
Take The A-Train (theme) + Blues on the Double
Duke Ellington Orchestra
’A Date With The Duke’
Toledo OH
ABC/AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
Set 4
1931 – 32 Cocoanut Grove Radio Transcriptions
Music in the Moonlight (theme) + Say You Are Teasing Me
Jimmie Grier Orchestra (voc) Gogo Delys
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1931
Any Corner Is A Cosy Corner
Gus Arnheim Orchestra (voc) Loyce Whiteman
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1932
Tomorrow + Music in the Moonlight (theme)
Jimmie Grier Orchestra (voc) Gogo Delys
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1931
Set 5
1930s-40s Dance Band Songs From The Movies
Eine Insel aus Traumen geboren
Hans Rehmstedt Orchestra
Comm Rec
from the film, “Eine Nacht in Mai”
Berlin
Dec 1938
Bei dir war es immer so schoen
Kurt Were met seine Solisten
Comm Rec
from the film, “Anita und der Teufel”
Berlin
1941
Aus lauter Liebe
Die Goldene Sieben (voc) Peter Igelhoff
Comm Rec
from the film, “Capriolen”
Berlin
Jul 1937
Went Du einmal win Maedel magst
Die Goldene Sieben
Comm Rec
from the film, “Sensationsprozess Casilla”
Berlin
Aug 1939
Set 6
Songs From The Early 1930s
Gnaedige Frau, comma’ und spiel’ mit mir
Hans Albers
Comm Rec
from the film, “Quick”
1932
Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gave To Me
Kay Kyser and his Band from the Carolines
Aircheck
12 Jun 1934
Maniac’s Ball
Glen Gary and the Casa Loma Orchestra
Radio Transcription
1934
Fine and Dandy
Anson Weeks Orchestra
Radio Transcription
1932
Set 7
R’n’B Singers on 1956 Radio with the Count Basie Orchestra
One O’Clock Jump (theme) + Tweedlee Dee
LaVerne Baker
’Saturday Night Rock’n’Roll Dance Party’
WCBS CBS NY
1956
I’ll Be True
Faye Adams
’Saturday Night Rock’n’Roll Dance Party’
WCBS CBS NY
1956
Dance With Me, Henry
Etta James
’Saturday Night Rock’n’Roll Dance Party’
WCBS CBS NY
1956
I Almost Lost My Mind
Ivory Joe Hunter
’Saturday Night Rock’n’Roll Dance Party’
WCBS CBS NY
1956
Set 8
Bop Takes on Old Songs
Fine and Dandy
Barry Ulanov’s All-Star Modern Jazz Musicians incl. Dizzy Gillespie
’Bands For Bonds’
WOR Mutual NYC
13 Sep 1947
What Is This Thing Called Love?
Charlie Parker and strings
Apollo Theatre NYC
17 Aug 1950
Out of Nowhere
Miles Davis and Charlie Parker
’Symphony Sid Show’
WMCA NYC
18 Dec 1948
This Time The Dream’s On Me
Charlie Parker, Fats Navarro, Bud Powell
’Symphony Sid Show’
WJZ ABC NYC
30 Jun 1950

Penrith RSL Remembrance Day, Greg Poppleton, Bob Gillespie, Lovelace Watkins and Marion Harris


Greg Poppleton and his band of 1920s – 1930s jazz swing musicians had a fantastic Saturday. We played two fun jazz gigs audiences greatly enjoyed and danced to – Penrith RSL Saturday Jazz, followed by ‘Deckers in the Night’ at the Sydney Bus Museum.

Saturday was Remembrance Day. At the band’s previous show in August I had been asked by Penrith Club members to introduce a suitable song to commemorate the day.

I chose the 1918, armistice year hit, ‘After You’ve Gone’, inspired by one of my favourite singers, Marion Harris,

I also shot a little tongue-in-cheek Christmas promo for the band’s four albums of CDs and mp3s. Please form an orderly queue now to the online Bandcamp shop. See full details in the description below this YouTube video shot live at the Penrith show:

As always, I took some snaps of the Greg Poppleton band for you. The band features some of Sydney’s most experienced swing, jazz musicians. All are world-toured.

Drummer, Bob Gillespie, played in the Glenn Miller Orchestra for their 1990s Australian tours as well as being drummer for Maynard Ferguson’s English Band and musical director for Lovelace Watkins. You can see him here backing Lovelace Watkins on ‘My Way’.

Now for a triple threat (as they say in ‘showbiz’) of the Greg Poppleton Penrith RSL Remembrance Day show photos…

Greg Poppleton and band have been regulars at Penrith RSL jazz for 9 years
Greg Poppleton and band have been regulars at Penrith RSL jazz for 9 years

 

Greg Poppleton is Australia's only authentic 1920s - 1930s singer
Greg Poppleton is Australia’s only authentic 1920s – 1930s singer

 

The Greg Poppleton band for the 11 Nov concert - Bob Gillespie drums, Stan Kenton double bass, Damon Poppleton alto sax and Grahame Conlon guitar doubling banjo.
The Greg Poppleton band for the 11 Nov concert – Bob Gillespie drums, Stan Kenton double bass, Damon Poppleton alto sax and Grahame Conlon guitar doubling banjo.

A real 1920s – 1930s singer and band is a must for a successful 1920s – 1930s themed event.

Greg Poppleton’s energy and authentic 1920s – 1930s vocals bring dynamic, Great Gatsby charm to concerts, clubs, weddings, corporate events and house parties. Find out how we can make your next event swing…

Booking Contact

100 – 92 Awesome Gift Ideas For Christmas


Stunning value for you this Christmas from the House of Poppleton, purveyors of quality music,

Searching for an inspiring Christmas gift? A gift that keeps on giving? A gift that won’t break the bank?
* It’s a square box with a disc inside.
* It’s a musical pleasuring device.
* It’s a drinks coaster, a festive table place setting, frisbee, safety reflector, wall hanging or delightful baby cot mobile.
* The possibilities are endless.
Or go green with the no-fuss, eco-friendly digital album via instantaneous electronic download, where 0 + 1 billions of times over equals sheer listening pleasure.

Quick! Order now while stocks last…

Bandcamp: https://gregpoppletonandhisbakelitebroadcasters.bandcamp.com/music

CDBaby: https://store.cdbaby.com/Artist/GregPoppletonandtheBakeliteBro

iTunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/greg-poppleton-and-the-bakelite-broadcasters/id574671719

Band website: (CDs only)
https://www.gregpoppletonmusic.com/buy/

How Did The Infamous 1930s Cotton Club Really Sound? Find Out-14 Nov Phantom Dancer Radio Show


Every week, Greg Poppleton brings you The Phantom Dancer – your non-stop two hour mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-1960s radio and TV.

Divided into 8 sets, Greg has been bringing you the Phantom Dancer on 107.3 2SER Sydney since 1985. It’s now heard on 23 radio stations across Australia. You can hear it any time only at 2ser.com

HOW DID THE INFAMOUS 1930s COTTON CLUB REALLY SOUND?

You’ll hear it on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

Set 7, in fact, is an all vinyl mix of Duke Ellington broadcasts from the infamous New York City nightclub where gangsters rubbed shoulders with socialites in a black fantasia.

The air checks are from 1937 and 1938.

This is the nightclub that inspired James Haskin’s novel, The Cotton Club, which in turn formed the basis of the 1984 Francis Ford Coppola 1984 hit crime drama of the same name.

An while Duke Ellington became synonymous with the Harlem nightspot in the late 1930s, it also featured such stars as Cab Calloway, Adelaide Hall, a very young Lena Horne, Fletcher Henderson and pianist/bandleader Dorothy Dandridge.

Started by heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson in 1920 as the Cafe Deluxe, Owney Madden took over the Harlem Club in 1923 on his release from Sing Sing prison.

Seeking rehabilitation through employment, no doubt, the gangster/bootlegger used the club to sell his boutique #1 beer. Though lovingly crafted from premium hops, no doubt, his brewed beverage was nonetheless illegal at the time due to prohibition.

And though the club was located in the black cultural heartland of Harlem, and the talent was all black, presenting ‘authentic black entertainment’, the club was notorious for its brazenly selective door policy, strictly well-off white patrons only.

However, the steep cover charge translated into high fees for the performers.

Ellington, himself, was expected to write ‘jungle music’ for the ‘black exotica’ presented in the form of revues with dancers, comedians and the band.

Meanwhile the club killed many of the smaller black cabarets in Harlem, unable to compete with the lavish Cotton Club shows, their customers discouraged by the flood of white tourists who wanted to try any black club if it couldn’t be the Cotton Club.

At the time of the 1937-38 Duke Ellington broadcasts you’ll hear on today’s Phantom Dancer, the club had moved out of Harlem to Broadway. It was a safer locale for the club’s patrons after the Harlem race riots of 1936.

The Cotton Club’s Broadway opening featured a lavish 130 performer show starring Cab Calloway and dancer Bill ‘Bojangles’ Robinson who was paid the highest ever fee for a performer on Broadway.

In 1940, changing tastes, high rents and a tax evasion investigation closed the Cotton Club’s doors permanently.

Here’s footage 1930s Harlem and the original, famous Cotton Club with Duke Ellington:

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #288

107.3 2SER Tuesday 14 November 2017
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 22 other stations.

Set 1
Big Bands on 1950s Radio
Take The A Train (Theme) + Koko
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Town Casino
NBC Cleveland OH
17 Sep 1952
South
Chuck Cabot Orchestra
Empire Room
Rice Hotel
KTRH CBS Houston
Apr 1953
Cry
Ray Anthony Orchestra (voc) Marcie Miller
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Statler
WCBS CBS NY
1952
Set 2
Progressive Jazz on Radio
Instrumental
Miles Davis Nonet
’Symphony Sid Show’
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
4 Sep 1948
Red Pepper Blues
Art Pepper
’Jazz International’
AFRTS Re-broadcast
Hollywood
16 Jun 1960
Perdido
Pete Brown
’Stars in Jazz’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
2 Sep 1952
Set 3
Bing Crosby
Love in Bloom (theme) + Humming, Singing and Whistling
Bob Crosby (voc)Georgie Stoll Orchestra
’Woodbury Program’
KNX CBS Los Angeles
18 Sep 1934
Too Marvelous
Bing Crosby (voc) Buddy Cole Music
’Ford Roadshow’
KNX CBS LA
7 Sep 1957
Blue Skies + When The Blue Of The Night Meets The Gold Of The Day (theme)
Bing Crosby (voc) John Scott Trotter Orchestra
’Philco Show’
KECA ABC LA
30 Oct 1953
Set 4
Accordion Jazz
Japanese Sandman
Rytmin Swing Yhtye
Comm Rec
Helsinki
22 Jan 1948
Theme + It Had To Be You + The Very Thought Of You
Art van Damme Quartet (voc) Louise Carlisle
Radio Transcription
Chicago
1950
Kissa Viekoon (Jeepers Creepers)
Bruno Laako and Lepokot (The Bats)
Comm Rec
Helsinki
1939
Set 5
1st Esquire Jazz Concert
Blues + Esquire Bounce
Louis Armstrong, Jack Teagarden, Coleman Hawkins and more
’1st Esquire Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue New York
Metropolitan Opera House
18 Jan 1944
Rockin’ Chair
Mildred Bailey
’1st Esquire Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue New York
Metropolitan Opera House
18 Jan 1944
Basin Street Blues
Louis Armstrong All-Stars
’1st Esquire Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue New York
Metropolitan Opera House
18 Jan 1944
I’ll Get By
Roy Eldridge (tp) Billie Holliday (voc)
’1st Esquire Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue New York
Metropolitan Opera House
18 Jan 1944
Set 6
1940s Dance Bands on the Air
How Cute Can You Be
Jimmie Grier Orchestra
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1945
A Red Kiss On A Blue Letter
Les Brown Orchestra (voc) Doris Day
Peacock Room
Baker Hotel
CBS Dallas
9 Aug 1945
Sioux Sue
Ray Noble Orchestra
Beverley Wiltshire Hotel
Beverley Hills Ca
KFI NBC LA
4 Feb 1940
It’s Mellow
Glen Gary and the Casa Loma Orchestra
Aircheck
Hotel New Yorker NYC
1944
Set 7
Cotton Club on 1937-38 Radio
Harlem Speaks
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Cotton Club
WOR Mutual NY
18 Mar 1937
Intro + Jig Walk
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Cotton Club
WABC CBS NY
22 May 1938
I’m Slappin’ on Seventh Avenue + Lost in Meditation
Duke Ellington Orchestra (voc) Ivie Anderson
Cotton Club
WABC CBS NY
22 May 1938
The Gal From Harlem + Riding On A Blue Note
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Cotton Club
WABC CBS NY
1 May 1938
Set 8
Lester Young on 1956 Radio
Lullaby of Birdland (theme) + Three Little Words
Lester Young
Birdland
WJZ ABC NYC
5 Sep 1956
Lullaby of Birdland (theme) + Lester Leaps In
Lester Young
Birdland
WJZ ABC NYC
7 Aug 1956

Bush Bank Wedding Photos and Music Videos, 4 Nov 2017


Saturday night and Greg Poppleton was singing the songs of the 1920s and 1930s with his band at Simon and Aleis’ beautiful wedding at Bush Bank. Bush Bank is an old dairy farm on the coast just south of Kiama, two hours drive (or train + walk) from Sydney.

Having a live 1920s – 1930s jazz and swing band can make a fantastic difference to your wedding. Having Australia’s only authentic 1920s – 30s singer and band gives you the biggest emotional impact.

I took some photos to show you. In the meantime, find out about having Greg Poppleton at your wedding

Dancing to Greg Poppleton and his 1920s – 1930s band at Simon and Aleis’ perfect wedding, Bush Bank, Kiama.
The Illawarra is famous for its giant Port Jackson fig trees. The area was once a rainforest. The big wedding fig tree at Bush Bank.
The Illawarra is famous for its giant Port Jackson fig trees (and Cabbage Palms). The area was once a rainforest. The big wedding fig tree at Bush Bank.
Greg Poppleton's band of red hot 1920s-30s jazz musicians. (L-r) Glenn Henrich soprano, alto, baritone sax, clarinet and piccolo, Grahame Conlon guitar and banjo, Adam Barnard drums and washboard, Geoff Power trumpet and sousaphone.
Greg Poppleton’s band of red hot 1920s-30s jazz musicians. (L-r) Glenn Henrich soprano, alto, baritone sax, clarinet and piccolo, Grahame Conlon guitar and banjo, Adam Barnard drums and washboard, Geoff Power trumpet and sousaphone.
Greg Poppleton is Australia's only authentic 1920s-30s singer. Left, Glenn Henrich baritone sax. Right, Geoff Power trumpet.
Greg Poppleton is Australia’s only authentic 1920s-30s singer. Left, Glenn Henrich baritone sax. Right, Geoff Power trumpet.
Looking out of the marquee at Bush Bank and across the cow paddocks to the Pacific Ocean
Looking out of the marquee at Bush Bank and across the cow paddocks to the Pacific Ocean

FILM OF THE LOCAL AREA
set to music from Greg’s latest 1920s-30s album Back In Your Own Backyard.

In the band video below, I filmed the crashing waves about a year ago just where you see the white breakers in the picture above. Enjoy the 1914 hit, ‘They Didn’t Believe Me’ by the Greg Poppleton  1920s vocal, guitar and clarinet trio in a contemplative mode. The song is from the band’s album ‘Back In Your Own Backyard‘ available from Bandcamp, CDBaby and iTunes. 

And here’s the band playing ‘Yes, We Have No Bananas’, also from the album ‘Back In Your Own Backyard‘. And the film was also taken just over a year ago and just at the back of Bush Bank along the Kiama – Gerringong bush walk. Enjoy!

To book Greg Poppleton for your wedding, event or party, please visit the band website www.gregpoppletonmusic.com