Australian Trad Jazz on 1949 Radio – Phantom Dancer Show 21 August 2018


Trad jazz became the leading jazz style in Australia after World War Two. On this week’s Phantom Dancer with Greg Poppleton, we hear 1949 by two of the leading exponents of the style – Dave Dallwitz and Graeme Bell.

THE PHANTOM DANCER

Your non-stop mixtape of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio. Produced and presented by Australia’s only authentic 1920s – 1930s singer, Greg Poppleton, since 1985.

The Phantom Dancer is mixed live-to-air on 107.3 2SER Sydney, Tuesdays 12:04 – 2pm.

It’s then re-broadcast on 22 radio stations of the Community Radio Network and online at 2ser.com.

THIS WEEK’S PHANTOM DANCER MIX

– has a set of ‘Limehouse Blues’ on-air between 1934 and 1946, there’s a set of live radio dance bands from 1939, and there’s the Australian trad jazz on 1949 radio feature. The last hour of the mix is ALL VINYL.

See the full play list below….

AUSTRALIAN TRAD JAZZ

This week’s feature – a set of 1949 trad radio broadcasts from Adelaide and Melbourne and a commercial side from 1929.

JOE WATSON

Trumpeter Joe Watson came to Australia from the USA with the visiting Ray Tellier band and decided to stay. He lead Melbourne’s Green Mill Dance Hall Orchestra. This commercial record was made for ‘Coles’ stores on their ‘Embassy’ label.

joe watson

DAVE DALLWITZ – SOUTHERN JAZZ GROUP

Jazz pianist, band leader, ragtime, jazz, revue, symphonic and chamber music composer, classical cellist and bassoon player. He lead the Adelaide-based Southern Jazz Group from 1945 to 1951, which we hear in a South Australian radio broadcast from 1949. He was also an artist and associate member of the Royal South Australian Society of Arts.

Dave Dallwitz

GRAEME BELL

Dixieland and classical jazz pianist, composer and band leader. He famously toured Czechoslovakia in 1947, and later toured Germany and the UK in the early 50s. He was the first Westerner to lead a jazz band to China.

graeme bell

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Australian band, Graeme Bell, cut this on tour in Czechoslovakia in 1947.

21 AUGUST PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #328

107.3 2SER Tuesday 21 August 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 23 other stations.

Set 1
1940s Swing Bands on One Night Stand
Theme + Wherever There’s Me There’s You
Bobby Sherwood Orchestra (voc) Frances Glenn and Jay Johnson
‘One Night Stand’
Avadon Ballroom LA
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 Jun 1946
I Don’t Want To Love You Like I Do
Lee Castle Orchestra (voc) Natalie Kaye
‘One Night Stand’
Terrace Room
Newark NJ
AFRS Re-broadcast
30 Aug 1944
All Or Nothing At All + I Got Rhythm
Boyd Raeburn Orchestra (voc) Ted Travers
‘One Night Stand’
Roosevelt Hotel
Washington DC
AFRS Re-broadcast
Feb 1944
Set 2
Friendly Five Footnotes
I’ve Got Five Dollars (theme) + Ooh That Kiss! + Goodnight Sweetheart + I Wouldn’t Change You For The World + Alabamy Bound + I’ve Got Five Dollars (theme)
Freddy Rich Orchestra (voc) FR
‘Friendly Five Footnotes’
Radio Transcription
1932
Set 3
Concerts in Miniature
Open + Young Blood
Stan Kenton Orchestra
‘Concert in Miniature’
Rustic Cabin NJ
NBC
1952
Intermission Riff
Stan Kenton Orchestra
‘Concert in Miniature’
WSOC NBC Charlotte NC
1952
Artistry in Bolero
Stan Kenton Orchestra
‘Concert in Miniature’
Bowling Field
WRC NBC Washington DC
15 Jul 1952
Set 4
Your Hit Parade
Happy Days Are Here Again (theme) + Stop Beating Around The Mulberry Bush
Al Goodman Orchestra (voc) Bea Wain and The Hit Paraders
‘Your Hit Parade’
WABC CBS NY
22 Oct 1938
Gotta Be This Or That
Mark Warnow Orchestra (voc) Joan Edwards
‘Your Hit Parade’
AFRS Re-Broadcast
27 Oct 1945
Moonlight Becomes You + Love Me Or Leave Me (close)
Mark Warnow (voc) Barry Wood
‘Your Hit Parade’
AFRS Re-Broadcast
23 Jan 1943
Set 5
Limehouse Blues
Limehouse Blues
Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra
Radio Transcription
1934
Limehouse Blues
Glenn Miller Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WJZ NBC Blue NY
6 Nov 1940
Limehouse Blues
Erskine Hawkins Orchestra
Aircheck
New York City
Jun 1942
Limehouse Blues
Benny Goodman Sextet
‘One Night Stand’
The Click
Philadelphia
AFRS Re-broadcast
1 Jul 1946
Set 6
Australian Trad Jazz Radio
Alabama Stomp
Joe Watson Green Mill Orchestra
Comm Rec
Melbourne
17 Oct 1929
Strut Miss Lizzy
Graeme Bell Dixieland Band (voc) Roger Bell
3AW
Melbourne
1949
Emu Strut
Southern Jazz Group
5AD
Adelaide
18 Jun 1949
Georgia Bo Bo
Graeme Bell Dixieland Band (voc) Ade Monsborough
3AW
Melbourne
1949
Set 7
1939 Radio Dance Bands
Lady Be Good
Barney Rapp and his New Englanders
The Sign of the Drum
Cincinnati NBC Red NY
17 Jun 1939
This is No Dream
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS NY
18 Jul 1939
White Sails
Harry James Orch (voc) Connie Haines
‘America Dances’
WABC CBS NY and BBC London
19 Jul 1939
Last Two Weeks in July
Artie Shaw Orchestra (voc) Helen Forrest
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WEAF NBC Red NY
21 Oct 1939
Set 8
New Sounds in Jazz Radio
My Heart Stood Still
Shorty Rogers’ Giants
‘The Tonight Show’
Jul 1955
Royal Roost Bop
Dave Lambert and Buddy Stewart (voc)
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
5 Mar 1949
Budo
Bud Powell Trio
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
7 Mar 1953
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Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm – Phantom Dancer Swing Radio Mix 14 Aug 2018


Keys to success in popular music include a compelling back story that informs the music preferably with a rags to riches theme, a catchy name and/or a gimmick.

Shep Fields found fame almost as soon as he found the latter. And changing his name from Saul Feldman to the catchier Shep Fields also would have helped.

Shep Field is the feature artist on today’s Phantom Dancer. He was so popular and internationally famous even the Australian swing band of Wally Portingale included him in a song for their ‘All In Fun Revue’.

WHAT’S THE PHANTOM DANCER?

Excellent question young Harry. It’s your non-stop mixtape of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio. And it’s been live-to-air on 107.3 2SER Sydney, Tuesdays 12:04 – 2pm, since 1985.

The Phantom Dancer is then re-broadcast on 22 radio stations of the Community Radio Network and online.

In fact, you’ll be able to hear this week’s Phantom Dancer on 2ser.com online after the show. And there’s a stack of past Phantom Dancer swing jazz mix tapes for you to enjoy there as well.

THIS WEEK’S PHANTOM DANCER MIX

– has a set of ‘Women in Jazz’ introduced by jazz writer Leonard Feather for the Voice of America in 1951, we go free form with John Coltrane over WCBS-FM in 1965 and there’s the Shep Fields feature.

See the full play list below….

SHEP FIELDS

was a Swing Era U.S musician and band leader. He found fame by incorporating a simple idea into his music.

This week’s Phantom Dancer video, below, is a 1930s dramatisation of the eureka moment the idea struck. But here’s how the story goes for those of you not into film.

UP THE LADDER

Shep played clarinet and tenor saxophone in bands while at university. He played in a band at the prestigious Roseland Ballroom in 1931. In 1933 he was leading a band in that great proving ground for New York musicians and comedians in the 1930s and 1940s – the Borscht Belt. Next year he replaced the Jack Denny Orchestra in a residency at Hotel Pierre in New York City. He left that gig to back the dancers Veloz and Yolanda on a tour. 1936 found him in Chicago, with a contract to play at the Palmer House with radio broadcasts from that same spot included.

EUREKA!

Now he had come this far, the question was, how could he distinguish himself sufficiently from all the other dance band on the air and on stage to move to the next level of ‘name band’.

The inspiration came when he and his wife were sitting in a milk bar. Mrs Fields was blowing bubbles into her soft drink through a straw.

Eureka! Shep decided there and then that bubbling sound was what would introduce his band over the air. This moment was dramatised in a short film for cinema release in the late 1930s.

A BRAND IS BORN

Fields staged a contest amongst his fans in Chicago to suggest a new name for his band with the new sound.

The word ‘rippling’ came up in a number of entries. Fields himself came up with ‘Rippling Rhythm.’ And so a brand was born.

IDENTITY

That same year, 1936, with brand in place and signature sound, Shep Fields landed a record deal with the popular Bluebird label. His hits for this famous jazz record company included ‘Cathedral in the Pines’, ‘Did I Remember?’ and ‘Thanks for the Memory’.

shep fields

In 1937 Fields had his own radio show, ‘The Rippling Rhythm Revue’ with comedian Bob Hope, whose theme song was ‘Thanks for the Memory’ as announcer.

In 1938, Fields and Hope were featured together in the comedian’s first feature movie, The Big Broadcast of 1938.

Today’s Phantom Dancer will feature 1930s radio transcriptions of Shep Field’s Rippling Rhythm Orchestra in the final vinyl hour. In a 1940 radio transcription you’ll hear singer Hal Derwin who later became a band leader in his own right.

ALL REEDS

Shep Fields dropped his Rippling Rhythm Orchestra in 1941 for a bold experiment, an all-reeds orchestra with rhythm section and no brass called Shep Fields and His New Music.

We’ll hear his New Music in a radio transcription from 1942.

Though the critics liked it, the public wanted Rippling Rhythm.

And with the popularity of the big bands declining after World War Two, Fields bowed to the public pressure of declining New Music ticket sales. In 1947 he re-launched his Rippling Rhythm Orchestra.

He had already brought his own venue to guarentee bookings and radio airtime, the prestigious Glen Island casino in New Rochelle, New York, which is where the opening track in this week’s Shep Field set originates.

The Rippling Rhythm Orchestra lasted until 1963. That year, Shep Fields quit band leading to be a radio disc jockey in Houston. When that ended, he worked at Creative Management Associates with his brother Freddie Fields in Los Angeles.

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

It’s Shep Fields and his New Music with the ‘soundie’ The Whistler’s Mother-in-Law. Happy viewing!

31 JULY PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #327

107.3 2SER Tuesday 14 August 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 23 other stations.

Set 1
1944 Swing Bands
It’s Mellow
Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Tune Town Ballroom
AFRS Re-broadcast
St Louis
5 Apr 1944
Swinging on a Star
Bob Chester Orchestra (voc) Betty Bradley and David Allyn
‘One Night Stand’
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman, Chicago
AFRS Re-broadcast
8 Oct 1944
When I Get It + Blue Lou
Harry James Orchestra lead by Tommy Dorsey
Casino Garden
Ocean Park Ca
KECA ABC LA
12 Aug 1944
Set 2
Coltrane
My Favourite Things
John Coltrane
Half Note Club
WCBS-FM CBS NY
26 Mar 1965
Set 3
Famous Singers
Eleg Volt Nekem Magabol (I’ve Had Enough of You)
Karady Katalin
Comm Rec
Budapest
1943
Song of the Wanderer
Helen Humes (voc) Count Basie Orchestra
Aircheck
1939
Taking a Chance on Love
Ethel Waters
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
17 Jul 1945
Set 4
Women in Jazz 1951
Boogie Mysterioso
Mary Lou Williams with Mary Osbourne (elec g)
‘Jazz Club USA’
Voice of America
New York City
1951
Mary’s Guitar Boogie
Mary Osbourne
‘Jazz Club USA’
Voice of America
New York City
1951
Low Ceiling
Beryl Booker with Mary Osbourne (elec g)
‘Jazz Club USA’
Voice of America
New York City
1951
Set 5
Shep Fields Feature
Rippling Rhythm (theme) + My Future Just Passed
Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Orchestra (voc) Toni Arden
Glen Island Casino
New Rochelle NY
Aircheck
1947
Heavenly, Isn’t It?
Shep Fields and his New Music
Radio Transcription
New York City
1943
One Never One, Does One?
Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Orchestra (voc) Robert Goday
Radio Transcription
New York City
1937
Let There Be Love
Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Orchestra (voc) Hal Derwin
Radio Transcription
New York City
1940
Set 6
Sweet Bands on 1960s Radio
Open
Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians
New York World’s Fair
WCBS CBS NY
1964
Auld Lang Syne + Let’s Do It Again
Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians
Grill Room
Hotel Taft
WNBC NBC NY
1 Jan 1970
Blue, Blue My Heart Is Blue
Russ Morgan Orchestra
Top of the Strip
Dunes Hotel
KLAV Las Vegas NV
19 Jul 1969
Medley
Jan Garber Orchestra
Lady Luck Lounge
Desert Inn
KLAC Las Vegas NV
4 Jul 1965
Set 7
Ray Noble’s American Orchestra
The Very Thought of You (theme) + Flowers for Madame
Ray Noble’s American Orchestra
‘Coty Hour’
Radio City
WEAF NBC Red NY
13 Mar 1935
Irving Berlin Songs
Ray Noble’s American Orchestra
‘The Magic Key of RCA’
Radio City
WEAF NBC Red NY
9 Feb 1936
Set 8
New Jazz on 1949 – 51 Radio
Perdido + Tiny’s Blues
Terry Gibbs All-Stars
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
1951
Move
Stan Getz
‘Modern Jazz Concert’
Carnegie Hall NY
Voice of America
25 Dec 1949

Santo Grasso Jazz Photos


Last Sunday, I took my 1920s – 1930s Jazz Deco band to Sydney Rowing Club, overlooking the Parramatta River to play an afternoon of music, fun and dancing.

And there was lots of dancing and lots of fun. It’s an inspiration to play to dancers. It’s a joy to play to such a warm and appreciative audience.

MOVIE

At Sydney Rowers the gig before, in April, someone took this film of the Jazz Deco band and I, then through a third party, generously sent it on to me to share with you…

SANTO GRASSO JAZZ PHOTOS
What a wonderful surprise then, just before downbeat on the first set, to see my favourite photographer, Santo Grasso. He’d come along to take photos of the band.

Now he’s generously sharing them with us here.

Please check out Santo’s wonderfully evocative photos of Sydney on his instagram page. Start following him! https://www.instagram.com/explore__sydney/

Swing dancing to Greg Poppleton
Swing dancing to Greg Poppleton

 

Greg Poppleton - authentic 1920s - 1930s singer
Greg Poppleton – authentic 1920s – 1930s singer

 

Greg Poppleton and his Jazz Deco Band - Damon Poppleton alto sax - Grahame Conlon guitar and banjo - Thomas Wade double bass - Adam Barnard drums and washboard
Greg Poppleton and his Jazz Deco Band – Damon Poppleton alto sax – Grahame Conlon guitar and banjo – Thomas Wade double bass – Adam Barnard drums and washboard

 

Damon Poppleton alto sax
Damon Poppleton alto sax

 

Grahame Conlon guitar doubling banjo
Grahame Conlon guitar doubling banjo

 

Thomas Wade double bass
Thomas Wade double bass

 

Greg Poppleton singing through the red 1920s megaphone
Greg Poppleton singing through the red 1920s megaphone

 

Adam Barnard washboard and percussion
Adam Barnard washboard and percussion

 

Dancing to the Greg Poppleton 1920s - 30s band at Sydney Rowers - a photo I took from behind the microphone
Dancing to the Greg Poppleton 1920s – 30s band at Sydney Rowers – a photo I took from behind the microphone

Where can you see us next?

Contact Greg Poppleton now for real 1920s – 30s fun at your occasion

Yes We Have No Bananas – Country Version


Why is the focus on cows in this clip about bananas?

 

That’s a good question. Particularly since cows aren’t mentioned in the song.

THE STORY IS THIS

I took the film you see in the clip while walking between the towns of Kiama and Gerringong in New South Wales.

I saw this small herd sheltering from the hot sun under some small trees in the green, green grass.

I perched my pocket camera on the thickest branch of a bush and filmed them. It was a little bit breezy, so the branch swayed, hence the unsteady clip.

These cows look so contented!

ALBUM

Six months later, when I released this song in the album Back In Your Own Backyard, I chose the film to accompany this upbeat version of ‘Yes, I Have No Bananas’ because of the tension between the fast tempo of the song and the laid-back ‘tempo’ of the cows.

I also like that, to my not pitch-prefect ears, that where I placed the moos the cows make in the beginning of the mix, the note seems to be close to the same note as the banjo makes, just a bit flat and an octave down.

The song is in Bb. The cow is mooing in B very b

BAND

Greg Poppleton – 1920s vocals
Geoff Power – sousaphone, trumpet and trombone
Paul Furniss – alto sax and clarinet
Grahame Conlon – Spanish guitar
Lawrie Thompson – drums and washboard

Hear The Mother of Modern Pop Singing – Phantom Dancer Radio 7 August 2018


When you hear a woman pop singer in any genre singing ‘naturally’ today, blame 1930s big band singer, Helen Ward. She blazed the trail.

You’ll hear a Helen Ward set of live 1930s-40s broadcasts on this week’s Phantom Dancer with Greg Poppleton.

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mixtape of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio, recorded live-to-air at 107.3 2SER Sydney, Tuesdays 12:04 – 2pm, and presented by Greg Poppleton since 1985.

It is heard on 22 radio stations of the Community Radio Network and online.

If you can’t catch this week’s Phantom Dancer mix live on 107.3 2SER, you can hear it immediately after 2ser.com online.

That’s the place where you’ll also find lots of past Phantom Dancer swing jazz mix tapes.

THIS WEEK’S PHANTOM DANCER MIX

– visits the Cocoanut Grove 1932-34, dives in Hank Williams on 1952 Hillbilly radio, listens to some of Duke Ellington’s extended works on his ‘Date with the Duke’ 1945 radio series and then there’s the Helen Ward feature. See the play list below….

HELEN WARD

Helen Ward was one of the first swing band ‘girl singers’, as they were known whatever their age, to become a ‘name’.

She was crucial in establishing the natural, untrained voice style of female pop singing that continues to this day with Gaga, Beyoncemore.

Ward came to commercial prominence in 1934 as the singer with Benny Goodman’s Orchestra when it made its breakthough broadcasts on the NBC ‘Let’s Dance’ radio show.

She stayed with the Benny Goodman Orchestra until 1936, just before it became hugely popular.

Helen Ward and Benny Goodman

The ‘girl singer’ who took Helen Ward’s place in the Goodman Orchestra, Martha Tilton, borrowed heavily from the Ward style.

Despite the fact that the Goodman Orchestra had a long and distinguished career into the 1970s, and had female singers like Martha Tilton, Patti Page, Peggy Lee and even Ella Fitzgerald, Ward remained the singer synonymous with the Benny Goodman Band.

THE MOTHER OF MODERN POP SINGING

This is important to note because the Ward style also became the basis of female pop singing that continues to this day.

Her style, which was significant in the Goodman band’s 1934 success is unaffected and untrained. It’s technical waeknesses were overcome by an assured style, creating the illusion of a ‘natural’ voice.

And like so many ‘natural’ singers today, who play ‘natural’ guitar accompanying themselves on ‘natural’ songs about their ‘natural’ lives, Ward, too, learnt an instrument as a child. In her case it was the piano, taught to her by her father, naturally.

She took up singing as a teenager as half of a duo with songwriter and pianist, Burton Lane. That exposure with such a high-profile pop writer brought her to the notice of a number of New York band leaders, with whom she sang over the radio.

Between 1934 and 1936, Ward waxed several records with Goodman. Her version of ‘These Foolish Things’ sold over a million copies and cemented her professional reputation.

She left Goodman in 1936 for both personal and professional reasons. She was engaged to marry Goodman, but after a few months he back out. She also had had enough of the gruelling band road trips.

After singing with Goodman and touring, she stuck to the studios. She recorded for Goodman alumni Gene Krupa, Teddy Wilson (standing in for Billie Holiday), Joe Sullivan and Harry James.

On this week’s Phantom Dancer you’ll also hear her on the radio with Bob Crosby in 1939 and Peanuts Hucko.

For a short while in 1943, she returned to performing with a band led by Hal McIntyre.

She went into semi-retirement from singing to be a radio producer in 1946-7 for station WMGM, New York.

From then on, she swapped long periods away from bands with recording and touring including returns to Benny Goodman in 1953, 57 and 58.

Around 1960 she retired from the public eye, but returned in 1979 following the hoopla surrounding the 40th anniversary of the 1938 Benny Goodman Carnegie Hall concert, which she was instrumental in having recorded.

She launched into a string of club gigs in New York City and in 1981 released the album, ‘The Helen Ward Song Book’. Now hear her on The Phantom Dancer.

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Helen Ward sings ‘Oh, Sweet Susannah!’ with the Benny Goodman in a 1936 broadcast from the Congress Hotel, Chicago, over NBC. Happy Listening!

7 AUGUST  PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #326

107.3 2SER Tuesday 7 August 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 23 other stations.

Set 1
1930s Radio Dance Bands
Open + Rockin’ the Town
Hal Kemp Orchestra
‘Chesterfield Show’
KNX CBS LA
25 Dec 1937
Dancing in the Dark
Bob Chester Orchestra
Mayfair Room
Hotel van Cleve
Dayton OH
CBS
21 Sep 1939
St Louis Blues + Cavernism (close)
Earl Hines Orchestra
Grand Terrace
WMAQ NBC Red Chicago
3 Aug 1938
Set 2
Jazz Moderne on the Wireless
All of Me
Miles Davis
Birdland
WCBS CBS NY
17 Oct 1957
Ornitholgy + Fifty-Second Street Theme
Charlie Parker
Hi-Hat Club
WCOP Boston
1954
Set 3
Radio Variety
Al Jolson Story
Al Jolson
‘Rinso Show’
KNX CBS LA
6 Apr 1937
Open + Change Partners
Bob Hope + Skinnay Ennis Orchestra
‘Bob Hope Show’
KNX CBS LA
27 Sep 1938
18 Feb 1945
Abdiction News + Love Marches On + Close
Eddie Cantor
‘Texaco Town’
WABC CBS NY
6 Dec 1936
Set 4
Coconut Grove Radio 1932-34
Theme + Too Beautiful For Words
Jack, Mae and Dee Howard (voc) Vincent Valsanti Orch
Radio Transcription
Cocoanut Grove
Los Angeles
1934
How’s About It?
Phil Harris and Leah Ray (voc) Phil Harris Orchestra
Radio Transcription
Cocoanut Grove
Los Angeles
1933
Gooby Gear + Music in the Moonlight (close)
Jimmy Grier Orchestra (voc) Donald Novis
Radio Transcription
Cocoanut Grove
Los Angeles
1932
Set 5
Helen Ward Feature
Anything Goes
Benny Goodman Orchestra (voc) Helen Ward
WJZ Blue Network NY
27 Mar 1935
It’s Funny To Everyone But Me
Bob Crosby Orchestra (voc) Helen Ward
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS NY
18 Jul 1939
I Guess I’ll Have To Change My Plans
Benny Goodman Orchestra (voc) Helen Ward
‘Let’s Dance’
WEAF NBC Red NY
26 Jan 1935
My Funny Valentine
Peanuts Hucko (voc) Helen Ward
‘Eddie Condon’s Floorshow’
WNBT TV NYC
26 Mar 1949
Set 6
Benny Goodman 1940-46 Radio
Let’s Dance + Big John Special
Benny Goodman Orchestra
Peacock Court
Hotel Mark Hopkins
KFRC Don Lee-Mutual
San Francisco
28 May 1940
Swing Angel
Benny Goodman Orchestra
Meadowbrook Gardens
Culver City CA
KNX CBS LA
26 Jan 1946
Idaho
Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘Bond Wagon Radio Show’
Chicago Theatre
Chicago
10 aug 1942
Benny Rides Again
Benny Goodman Orchestra
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WABC CBS NY
20 Sep 1941
Set 7
Hillbilly Radio
Various
Hank Williams and Miss Audrey
‘Health and Happiness Show’
Radio Transcription
1952
Set 8
Duke Ellington’s Extended Works 1945 Radio
Frankie and Johnny
Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘Date with the Duke’
Regal Theatre
ABC Chicago
19 May 1945
Diminuendo in Blue / Rocks in My Bed/ Crescendo in Blue
Duke Ellington Orchestra (voc) Joya Sherrill
‘Date with the Duke’
ABC Toledo OH
9 June 1945

Savoy Ballroom Broadcasts – Phantom Dancer Radio Show 31 July 2018


A set of 1930s-40s live radio swing from ‘The Home of Happy Feet’, the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem, New York City is the feature on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

Every Tuesday, authentic jazz deco singer and actor, Greg Poppleton, brings you The Phantom Dancer.

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mixtape of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio, recorded live-to-air at 107.3 2SER Sydney, Tuesdays 12:04 – 2pm.

It’s re-broadcast on 22 radio stations of the Community Radio Network and online.

You can hear this week’s Phantom Dancer immediately after the 31 July broadcast online at 2ser.com. That’s the place where you’ll also find lots of past Phantom Dancer swing jazz mix tapes.

THIS WEEK’S PHANTOM DANCER MIX

– has a set Charlie Barnet from live 1957-59 radio, a set of jazz from the humorous 1940-41 ‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’ radio series, a set of 1935 Claude Hopkins Orchestra radio transcriptions and the Savoy Ballroom feature. See the play list below….

SAVOY BALLROOM

‘The Home of Happy Feet’ was described by poet Langston Hughes in his ‘Juke Box Love Song’ as the ‘Heartbeat of Harlem’ – Harlem being the centre of the African-America community in New York City.

On this week’s Phantom Dancer, the 1938 CBS broadcast of ‘This is New York’, Fats Waller names it as the Harlem go-to place ‘where everyone’s hip to the jive’. He then launches into the 1934 song that has since become a jazz standard, ‘Stomping at the Savoy’.

Being in Harlem, and as the ‘soul of the neighbourhood’, the dance hall, billed at its opening as the ‘World’s Finest Ballroom’, had a largely black clientele and band roster. However, the club had a no-discrimination policy, the important thing was that patrons knew how to dance and could swing.

savoy ballroom

10,000 SQUARE FEET

The ballroom at the Savoy, on the second floor of the building accessed by a marble staircase, was 10,000 square feet in area and could hold 4,000 people.

The ballroom walls were painted pink and lined with mirrors. Coloured lights shone on the sprung dance floor. The floor was replaced every three years because of the amount of dancing that took place.

On opening night, 20 March 1926, the New York Age reported, “Savoy Turns 2,000 Away On Opening Night – Crowds Pack Ball Room All Week”.

LINDY HOPPERS

Herbert White was a bouncer turned floor manager at the Savoy in the early 1930s. He kept an eye out for the best dancers to form his own dance troupe. This made the Savoy unique in that it came to house the best Lindy Hoppers.

Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers, as the cohort came to be known, turned professional in 1935 appearing on Broadway and in Hollywood including the 1937 Marx Brothers’ movie, ‘A Day at the Races’.

“The Savoy held a yearly dancing festival called the Harvest Moon Ball featuring lindy dancers. The first Ball was held in 1935, and the contestants introduced the Lindy Hop to Europe the next year.” (wiki)

As well as The Lindy Hop, other dances born in the Savoy dance hot house were The Flying Charleston, Jive, Snakehips, Rhumboogie, and variations of the Shimmy and Mambo.

‘The Evolution of Negro Dance’ was the Savoy’s contribution to the 1939 New York World Fair.

BANDS

The Savoy had a double bandstand so the music could be continuous for dancers with two bands playing alternatively each night. This also allowed the famous Savoy swing band cutting contests of the late 1930s.

Swing bands synonymous with the Savoy include the orchestras of Chick Webb, Erskine Hawkins, Lucky Millinder, Buddy Johnson and Cootie Williams who you’ll hear with Charlie Parker on this week’s Phantom Dancer mix.

The NYPD and Army shut the Savoy down in April 1943 on vice charges, despite the place having been run by gangsters since its 1926 opening. The ridiculous closure was reversed by mid-October that year.

TORN DOWN

The Savoy continued to operate until October 1958. Despite a big campaign to save it, the building was demolished for a housing complex.

“On 26 May 2002, Frankie Manning and Norma Miller, surviving members of Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers, unveiled a commemorative plaque for the Savoy Ballroom.” (wiki)

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Dancing at the Savoy c 1950s

31 JULY PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #324

107.3 2SER Tuesday 31 July 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 23 other stations.

Set 1
Charlie Barnet
Redskin Rhumba (theme) + Lumby
Charlie Barnet Orchestra
‘Charlie Barnet Show’
Radio Transcription
1957
Along The Santa Fe Trail
Charlie Barnet Orchestra
Salt Air Ballroom
KDYL Salt Lake City UT
5 Jun 1957
Moten Swing + Redskin Rhumba
Charlie Barnet Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Palladium Ballroom
AFRS Re-broadcast
1959
Set 2
Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street
Open + Beale St Blues
Henry Levine Dixieland Octet
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
16 Jun 1940
Flying Home
Lionel Hampton
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
19 Aug 1940
I Dreamt I Dwelled in Harlem + Close
Paul Lavalle Woodwinds
‘Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
1 Sep 1941
Set 3
The Blooz
Pointless Mama Blues
Herbie Fields and Miles Davis (voc) Rubberlegs Williams
Comm Rec
New York City
24 Apr 1945
Chubby’s Blues
Woody Herman’s First Herd (voc) Woody Herman
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
WABC CBS NY
18 Feb 1945
Rocky Mountain Blues
Fletcher Henderson Orchestra
Comm Rec
New York City
21 Jan 1927
Set 4
Latin Sounds
Agata
Nino Taranto
Comm Rec
Turin
1937
Pim Pam Pum
Nita Rosa (voc) Xavier Cugat Orchestra
‘Xavier Cugat Show’
AFRS Re-broadcast
1944
Instrumental + Close
Enric Madriguera and his Music of the Americas
‘One Night Stand’
Copacabana
New York City
AFRS Re-broadcast
5 Jul 1945
Set 5
Trad Jazz on Radio
Back To Coajingalong
George Trevare Orchestra
Comm Rec
Sydney
1945
Bay City (theme) + Ragtime Dance
Turk Murphy San Francisco Jazz Band
Easy Street
KCBS CBS San Francisco
9 Dec 1958
Indiana
Kid Ory Jazz Band
Club Hangover
KCBS CBS San Francisco
10 Oct 1954
Farewell Blues + Close
Muggsy Spanier
‘This is Jazz’
WOR Mutual NYC
22 Mar 1947
Set 6
Claude Hopkins Radio Transcriptions
I’d Do Anything For You
Claude Hopkins Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
18 Oct 1935
Chasing the Blues Away
Claude Hopkins Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
1935
Singin’ in the Rain
Claude Hopkins Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
1935
Put On Your Old Gray Bonnet
Claude Hopkins Orchestra
Radio Transcription
New York City
1935
Set 7
Stompin’ at the Savoy
Stompin’ at the Savoy
Fats Waller
‘This is New York’
WABC CBS NY
11 Dec 1938
Body and Soul (theme) + Chicago
Coleman Hawkins Orchestra
Savoy Ballroom
Aircheck
4 Aug 1940
The Count Steps In
Count Basie Orchestra
Savoy Ballroom
Aircheck
30 Jun 1937
Floogie Boo + Close
Cootie Williams Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Savoy Ballroom
AFRS Re-broadcast
12 Feb 1945
Set 8
Progessive Jazz on the Air
The Gentle Art of Love (theme) + Aw, C’mon
Oscar Pettiford
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
Jun 1957
Little Girl Blue
Stan Getz
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
1956
Cement Mixer
Slim Gaillard
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
20 May 1951

Spike Jones and his City Slickers – Phantom Dancer 24 July


The Phantom Dancer – a weekly radio mixtape of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio and TV produced and presented by authentic 1920s-30s singer, Greg Poppleton.

Greg has presented the multi-award winning Phantom Dancer on 107.3 2SER Sydney since 1985. It is now heard on 23 radio stations and online.

Check it out https://2ser.com/phantom-dancer/

See the play list for this week’s Phantom Dancer below. This week’s mixtape has a special broadcast recording by Spike Jones and his City Slickers of ‘F-B-Aida’ a send-up of Verdi’s famous opera.

SPIKE JONES

Was a U.S drummer, percussionist and bandleader most famous for his parodies of popular tunes on record, radio and TV in the 1940s and 1950s.

These parodies were performed by his City Slickers. He also ran a serious orchestra playing lush arrangements of pop songs called the ‘Other Orchestra’.

Spike Jones took up drums at age 11. A railway restaurant chef taught him how to use objects like pots and pans as percussion. This skill got him onto popular radio shows in the 1930s as a comic percussionist. But he was also a dance band drummer and studio musician.

In fact, he was the drummer on the original version of the biggest selling record of all time, ‘White Christmas’ sung by Bing Crosby.

BORED

Tired of playing the same music every night for radio orchestras, Jones and like-minded musicians got together playing send-ups of popular ditties which they recorded to amuse their wives. One recording found its way to the offices of RCA Victor which offered the parody band a contract.

Their first record was Der Fuehrer’s Face which became a huge hit.

They starred in their own radio show between 1945 and 1949, and in their own NBC and CBS television shows from 1954 to 1961.

Spike Jones ponders the two-headed man
Spike Jones ponders the two-headed man

On this week’s Phantom Dancer, we hear Spike Jones and his City Slickers live on 1949 radio.

And for your Phantom Dancer Video of the Week, marvel at the City Slickers live on 1950s TV sending up ‘That Ol’ Black Magic’.

Bill Barty, who performed in film and TV up until his death in 2000, sings in the style of James Cagney, Jimmy Durante and finishes with Johnny Ray.

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #323

107.3 2SER Tuesday 24 July 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+11 hours GMT)

Set 1
Theme + Manhattan Spiritual
Jerry Gray and his Band of Today
‘One Night Stand’
Palladium Ballroom
AFRTS Re-broadcast
30 Oct 1959
Redskin Rhumba (theme) + Murder at Peyton Hall
Charlie Barnet Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Casino Gardens
Ocean Park Ca
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 Jan 1947
Dancing Tambourine + Close
Henry Russell Orchestra
‘Let’s Dance’
KFI NBC LA
1948
Set 2
Rollin’ Home
Ray Anthony Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Statler NY
AFRS Re-broadcast
11 Jan 1952
Daahoud
Max Roach – Clifford Brown Quartet
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
6 May 1956
Lover Come Back To Me + Close
Stan Getz Quartet
Basin Street
WCBS CBS NY
21 Apr 1956
Set 3
Goodbye Sue
Perry Como (voc) Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘For The Record’
WEAF NBC NY
1944
Love Is A Simple Thing
Sauter-Finnegan Orchestra (voc) Andy Roberts and Sally Sweetland
‘The All-Star Parade of Bands’
Blue Note
WMAQ NBC Chicago
12 Sep 1953
I Get a Kick Out of You + Close
Sarah Vaughan
‘Stars in Jazz’
Birdland
WNBC NBC NY
21 Apr 1952
Set 4
I Found a New Baby
Ralph Sutton All-Stars
Club Hangover
KCBS CBS SF
7 Sep 1954
I Can’t Give You Anything But Love + Close
Harry Sosnick and the Savings Bonds Orchestra
‘Guest Star – Dixieland Clambake’
Radio Transcription
New York
1951
Runnin’ Wild + Close
Chris Barber Jazz Band
‘Traditional Jazz’
BBC Light Programme
London
AFRTS Rebroadcast
9 May 1955
Set 5
Forgotten
Harry James Orchestra
Palladium Ballroom
KNX CBS LA
1949
Oh! What a Beautiful Morning
Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra
Casino Gardens
Ocean Park Ca
KECA ABC LA
19 Sep 1946
I’ll Get By
Woody Herman Orchestra (voc) WH
‘Woody Herman Show’
Jun 1946
Daily Double
Buddy Rich Orchestra
Aircheck
Los Angeles
Mar 1946
Set 6
‘Buck Benny Rides Again’
Jack Benny
‘Hollywood is on the Air’
Buck Benny Rides Again Trailer
Radio Transcription
Hollywood
1940
F-B-Aida
Spike Jones and the City Slickers
‘The Spike Jones Show’
CBS
25 Jun 1949
Set 7
Jeepers Creepers
Paul Whiteman Orchestra
‘Paul Whiteman Show’
WJZ NBC Blue NY
7 Dec 1938
Open + Huckleberry Duck
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Panther Room
Hotel Sherman
WMAQ NBC Red NY
1940
Diga Diga Doo
Bob Crosby Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS NY
18 Jul 1939
Day In Day Out + Merry-Go-Round
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Southland Cafe
WNAC NBC Boston
9 Jan 1940
Set 8
Manteca
Dizzy Gillespie Orchestra
Winter Palace
Stockholm
Radio Sweden
2 Feb 1948
Be Bop Boogie
Lester Young Quintet
‘Symphony Sid Show’
Royal Roost
WMCA NY
4 Dec 1948
How High The Moon
Allen Eager
Birdland
WJZ ABC NY
Jun 1953
Bye Bye Blues
Benny Goodman Sextet
‘One Night Stand’
The Click
Philadelphia
AFRS Re-broadcast
3 Jun 1948