Brecht and his Opera – Phantom Dancer 25 September 2018


I remember, maybe inaccurately, a verse by satirist Barry Humphries‘ character, Sir Les Patterson, that went like this, “Singing songs by Brecht needs the memory of an elephant / But what they lack in tune, they gain in relevance.” Brecht’s original 1930 radio-like recording of the Threepenny Opera is this week’s Phantom Dancer feature.

SHOW

The Phantom Dancer is your non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1929 – 65 radio.

Mixed live-to-air by 1920s – 1930s singer and actor, Greg Poppleton, on radio 2SER 107.3 Sydney since 1985, The Phantom Dancer is re-broadcast on 23 radio stations of the Community Radio Network and online at 2ser.com.

You can hear lots of past Phantom Dancers, too, at 2ser.com.

PLAYLIST

The Brecht feature and a whole mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-50s radio. Read the full play list below.

Remember – the ALL VINYL FINYL HOUR.

DREIGROSCHENOPER

With song lyrics by Kurt Weill and book by Bertolt Brecht, The Threepenny Opera (Dreigroschenoper), ‘a play with music’, was based on an Elisabeth Hauptmann translation of John Gay’s 18th-century English ballad opera, The Beggar’s Opera. Hauptmann was Brecht’s girlfriend. Brecht did not credit her work.

RIP-OFF

1. Brecht claimed he did the translation, not Hauptmann
2. Brecht added four songs by French poet François Villon, without crediting Villon.
3. For these songs he used the translations by K. L. Ammer, without crediting Ammer.

When questioned by critics about these lapses, Brecht said he had, “a fundamental laxity in questions of literary property.”

Mack the knife

STANDARDS

On this week’s Phantom Dancer we hear Lotte Lenya (married to Weill), Kurt Gerron, Erich Ponto, Willy Trenk-Trebitsch and Erika Helmke sing songs from Brecht’s play. the recordings are from an album of 78rpm records with radio-like announcements, made in Berlin in 1930.

Two of these songs you’ll now recognise as standards. They are, ‘Die Moritat von Mackie Messer’ (Mack the Knife) a jazz standard, and ‘Seeräuberjenny’ (Pirate Jenny) a cabaret staple.

CAPITALIST

Opening on 31 August 1928 at Berlin’s Theater am Schiffbauerdamm, The Threepenny Opera, is a socialist critique on the capitalist world.

PETIT-BOURGEOIS

But despite its socialist credentials, Brecht’s ‘play with music’ was panned after its 1930 Soviet premier. Izvestia scowled: “It is high time that our theatres ceased playing homage to petit-bourgeois bad taste and instead turned to more relevant themes.” Oh, Sir Les!

IMPACT

Composer Weill’s artistic gave his intent for the music in a dense statement he issued in 1929, “Opera was founded as an aristocratic form of art. If the framework of opera is unable to withstand the impact of the age, then this framework must be destroyed. In the Dreigroschenoper, reconstruction was possible insofar as here we had a chance of starting from scratch.”

He also opined, “music cannot further the action of the play or create its background but achieves its proper value when it interrupts the action at the right moments.” This was much copied by subsequent Western doyens of agitprop-style worthiness.

BANKERS

The Threepenny Opera was slow to pick up audiences, but then it became a huge success in Berlin with 400 performances in its first run.

And ironically, the first run of Brecht’s socialist work was the place to be for Berlin’s monied classes. Socialites, bankers, industrialists and diplomats saw Brecht’s play as the place to be seen.

Productions elsewhere in the world in the 1930s were flops. Weill described a 1935 BBC broadcast of the play as totally misunderstanding what it was about. The 1930s Broadway production was described as dreary, though the music was praised, and closed after 12 performances.

SCORE

As you’ll hear, Weill’s music borrowed heavily from 1920s German jazz and dance band music, and this is its most interesting attribute.

Like Greg Poppleton’s 1920s-30s band, the original Lewis Ruth band in the 1930 album recording of The Threepenny Opera you’ll hear on this week’s Phantom Dancer were all multi-instrumentalists.

The seven-piece ensemble played 23 instruments.

VIDEO

Max Raabe introduces Bertolt Brecht…

25 SEPTEMBER PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #333

107.3 2SER Tuesday 25 September 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 23 other stations.

Set 1
Raymond Scott on 1940-41 Radio
Pretty Little Petticoat (theme) + Wellesley High Jump
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Blackhawk Restaurant
WGN Mutual Chicago
21 Oct 1940
Humpty-Dumpty Heart
Raymond Scott Orchestra (voc) Roberta Leigh
Burmuda Room
Hotel Brunswick
WBZ Boston
6 Dec 1941
Huckleberry Duck + Pretty Little Petticoat (theme)
Raymond Scott Orchestra
Blackhawk Restaurant
WGN Mutual Chicago
1 Nov 1940
Set 2
John Coltrane live on 1960s Radio
Afro Blue
John Coltraine
The Half-Note
WCBS-FM NY
26 Mar 1965
Set 3
Trad Jazz on 1940s Radio
Way Down Yonder In New Orleans (theme) + Original Dixieland One Step
Wild Bill Davison
‘This is Jazz’
WOR Mutual NY
17 May 1947
Song of the Wanderer
Muggsy Spanier
‘Eddie Condon’s Jazz Concert’
WJZ Blue NY
17 Feb 1945
I’ve Got a Feeling I’m Falling + Way Down Yonder In New Orleans (theme)
Wild Bill Davison
‘This is Jazz’
WOR Mutual NY
24 May 1947
Set 4
Dreigroschenoper 1930
Overture + Mack the Knife
Lewis Ruth Band (voc) Kurt Gerron
Dreigroschenoper Album
Comm Rec
Berlin 1930
Ballad of the Agreeable Life + Love Duet + Cannon Song
Lewis Ruth Band (voc) Willy Trenk-Trebitsch, Erika Helmke, Gerron
Dreigroschenoper Album
Comm Rec
Berlin 1930
Pirate Jenny + Finale Act 1
Lewis Ruth Band (voc) Lotte Lenya, Erika Helmke, Erich Ponto
Dreigroschenoper Album
Comm Rec
Berlin 1930
Set 5
Harmonists on 1930s Radio
Swingin’ on the Strings
The Inkspots
WEAF NBC Red NY
9 Aug 1935
Swing for Sale
Mills Brothers
‘Norge Program’
Radio Transcription
NYC
1937
Why Don’t You Practice What You Preach?
Boswell Sisters
‘Woodbury Show’
KNX CBS LA
18 Sep 1934
Down Among the Sleepy Pines
The Three Ambassadors + Jean Shark
Cocoanut Grove
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1932
Set 6
Cab Calloway
Shout, Shout, Shout
Cab Calloway
Comm Rec
New York City
30 Aug 1938
Hey Now, Hey Now
Cab Calloway
‘One Night Stand’
Club Zanzibar NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
1945
We, The Cats, Shall Hep You
Cab Calloway
‘One Night Stand’
Club Zanzibar NYC
AFRS Re-broadcast
16 Jul 1945
Ducktrot
Cab Calloway
‘Guest Star’
Radio Transcription
New York City
17 Sep 1950
Set 7
Royal Garden Blues
Royal Garden Blues
Muggsy Spanier
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
11 Apr 1953
Royal Garden Blues
Ray Miller Orchestra
‘Sunny Meadows Show’
Radio Transcription
Chicago
26 Jan 1929
Royal Garden Blues
Louis Armstrong
‘Damon Runyon Memorial Jazz Concert’
Blue Note
ABC Chicago
11 Dec 1948
Royal Garden Blues
Hot Lips Page
‘Doctor Jazz’
Stuyvesant Casino
WMGM NYC
1950
Set 8
Women Singers Part 2
Rocking Chair (theme) + Please Don’t Talk About Me When I’m Gone + I’ll Never Be The Same
Mildred Bailey
‘Music Till Midnight’
WABC CBS NY
1944
As Long As I’m Dreaming
Peggy Lee
‘Peggy Lee Show’
KNX CBS LA
1948
Mad About The Boy
Lena Horne
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
1944
Chewin’ Gum + I Wanna Be A Rug Cutter
Ella Fitzgerald
Savoy Ballroom
WEAF NBC Red NY
4 Mar 1940
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Night and Day – Very Serious Live Concert Performance


Jazz is very serious and difficult. When it kicked off in the brothels of New Orleans, everyone had to listen carefully and critique, or else they’d be forcefully ejected from the bordello. Today, the Jazz Police continue a century old tradition of making jazz inaccessible. Fortunately, on the day this low-life jazz trio and singer were recording their ‘selfie-musicale’, the Jazz Police were patrolling a nearby empty concert hall where grant recipients and worthy jazz school graduates were carefully trudging through a stunning original in 11/16 and 22/8. The Jazz Society Improvised Collective Association Workshop Co-Op Newsletter write-up of their efforts was praiseworthy.

Night and Day – Cole Porter (1932) Singer – Greg Poppleton,
Guitar – Grahame Conlon, Double Bass – Dave Clayton, Drums – Bob Gillespie

Greg Poppleton makes 1920s-30s Pop.

Albums: https://gregpoppleton.bandcamp.com/
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/greg-poppleton-and-the-bakelite-broadcasters/574671719
Band Website: https://www.gregpoppletonmusic.com

Lester Young – Phantom Dancer Radio Show 18 September 2018


Lester Young started playing jazz in the family band. He became one of the most influential tenor saxophonists in jazz. He also coined a lot of hipster words. Lester Young is this week’s Phantom Dancer feature artist.

SHOW

The Phantom Dancer is a non-stop mix of swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio.

Mixed live-to-air by Greg Poppleton on radio 2SER 107.3 Sydney since 1985.

The Phantom Dancer is re-broadcast on 23 radio stations of the Community Radio Network and online at 2ser.com.

And 2ser.com is where you can hear lots of past Phantom Dancers, too.

PLAYLIST

The Lester Young feature and a whole mix of swing and jazz from live 1930s-50s radio. Read the full play list below. ALL VINYL FINYL HOUR.

LESTER YOUNG

Known as ‘Prez’, Lester Young was one of the most influential tenor saxophonists in jazz.

Reams have been written about Lester Young’s cool, fluid style so I won’t wax lyrical about that here.

Better you hear it first hand from live 1950s broadcast recordings on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

Lester Young

HIPSTER

Less known about Lester Young, is that he coined or popularised a lot of the hipster jargon that came to be associated with jazz.

‘Bread’ for money is a Lester Young original. ‘Bread’ became a Lester Young feature song in the 1956 Count Basie Orchestra. He’d ask, “How does the bread smell?” to mean what does the gig pay? He popularised the word ‘cool’, meaning ‘in vogue’.

FAMILY

Lester came from a musical family. His father was a band leader and Lester commenced his music career touring with the family band. His brother, Lee, was a drummer. In earler Phantom Dancers you would have heard the Lee and Lester Young band broadcasting from Los Angeles over KHJ.

CLARINET

Lester occasionally doubled on clarinet in the 1930s Walter Page Blue Devils Band and in the Count Basie Orchestra. It was stolen in 1939 and he didn’t pick up a licorice stick again until jazz promoter Norman Granz bought one for him in 1957.

INFLUENCE

Young wasn’t influenced by an earlier tenor sax player, but by Frankie Trambauer from Paul Whiteman’s Orchestra. FT played C-Melody Sax, the main sax played in the 1920s and pitched between alto and tenor.

BLUES

DB Blues is a Lester Young original you’ll hear on this week’s Phantom Dancer from a 1945 ‘Jubilee’ Armed Forces Radio broadcast.

Drafted into the army in 1944, Young was caught with marijuana and alcohol and dishonourably discharged. He was held in a DB ‘dentention barracks’ for one trauma filled year.

SOLO

Alcoholism, with symptoms of malnutriton and liver disease, affected his playing in the 1940s and 1950s, but there were also many moments of brilliance.

The most famous, which you can find online in an earlier Phantom Dancer, is his economic and emotive solo on ‘Fine and Mellow’, backing Billie Holliday in an all-star band on the CBS TV special, ‘The Sound of Jazz’.

VIDEO

Lester Young and that famous Lester Young solo on ‘The Sound of Jazz’, CBS TV, in 1957.

18 SEPTEMBER PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #332

107.3 2SER Tuesday 18 September 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 23 other stations.

Set 1
Gus Arnheim 1931 Radio
Sweet and Lovely (theme) + You Don’t Need Glasses To See I’m In Love
Gus Arnheim Orchestra
‘Cocoanut Grove’
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1931
It’s The Girl
Gus Arnheim Orchestra
‘Cocoanut Grove’
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1931
I Got The Ritz From The One I Love + Sweet and Lovely (theme)
Gus Arnheim Orchestra (voc) Loyce Whiteman
‘Cocoanut Grove’
Radio Transcription
Los Angeles
1931
Set 2
Modern Singers on 1950s Radio
Open + Blue Velvet
Arthur Prysock
‘Stars in Jazz’
Birdland
WRCA NBC NY
9 Sep 1952
Open + Tenderly + The Nearness of You
Sarah Vaughan
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Zardi’s
KFI NBC LA
21 May 1956
Happy Birthday + Send My Baby Back To Me + Close
Billy Eckstine
‘All-Star Parade of Bands’
Birdland
WRCA NBC NY
8 Jul 1953
Set 3
Club Hangover 1954
Relaxin’ at the Trouro + Senstation Rag
Muggsy Spanier
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
27 Nov 1954
Flying Home
Earl Hines
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
30 Jan 1954
Dardenella + Checkin’ With Chuck (theme)
Ralph Sutton
Club Hangover
KCBS San Francisco
24 Jul 1954
Set 4
Lester Young
DB Blues
Lester Young
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
22 Apr 1956
Call Me Darling
Count Basie Orchestra, Lester Young (ts) Thelma Capenter (voc)
V-Disc
New York City
27 May 1944
Polkadots and Moonbeams
Lester Young
‘Bandstand USA’
Cafe Bohemia
WOR Mutual NY
22 Dec 1956
Set 5
Headline Women Singers on 1940s Radio
The Starlit Hour
Ella Fitzgerald Orchestra (voc) EF
Savoy Ballroom
WEAF NBC Red NY
26 Feb 1940
Honeysuckle Rose
Lena Horne (voc) Fletcher Henderson Orchestra
‘Jubilee’
AFRS Hollywood
1944
Aintcha Ever Comin’ Back?
Peggy Lee (voc) Paul Weston Orchestra
‘Peggy Lee Show’
KNX CBS LA
1947
It Had To Be You + Close
Mildred Bailey (voc) Paul Baron Orchestra
‘Music Till Midnight’
WABC CBS NY
1944
Set 6
Cotton Club
Oh, Babe! Maybe Someday
Duke Ellington Orchestra (voc) Ivie Anderson
Cotton Club
WCBS CBS NY
24 Mar 1938
I’m Slappin’ on Seventh Avenue + Lost In Meditation
Duke Ellington Orchestra (voc) Ivie Anderson
Cotton Club
WCBS CBS NY
22 May 1938
The Gal From Joe’s + Riding on a Blue Note
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Cotton Club
WCBS CBS NY
1 May 1938
East St Louis Toodle-oo + Jig Walk + In a Sentimental Mood
Duke Ellington Orchestra
Cotton Club
WCBS CBS NY
8 May 1938
Set 7
1937 Radio
I’d Do Anything For You
Seger Ellis and his Choirs of Brass
Radio Transcription
NYC
1937
Pennies from Heaven
Mills Brothers
‘Norge Program’
Radio Transcription
NYC
1937
Johnny One Note
Hal Kemp Orchestra (voc) Skinnay Ennis
‘Chesterfield Show’
WABC CBS NY
1937
Blue Skies + Closing
George Hall Orchestra
Radio Transcription
NYC
1937
Set 8
Bop Big Bands on Radio
Oo-Pop-A-Da
Dizzy Gillespie Orchestra
Winter Palace
Radio Sweden
Stockholm
2 Feb 1948
Belvedere Bop
Chubby Jackson Orchestra
‘Symphony Sid Show’
WMCA NY
12 Mar 1949
Serenade in Sulphur-8
Slim Gaillard
‘Symphony Sid Show’
WJZ ABC NY
7 Jul 1951

Cool June Christy – Phantom Dancer Radio Show 11 Sep 2018


June Christy started singing professionally at 13. In the 1950s, her album ‘Something Cool’, which she re-recorded three times, launched the ‘cool’ vocal genre in jazz. She is this week’s Phantom Dancer feature artist.

THE PHANTOM DANCER

Swing and jazz from live 1920s-60s radio in a non-stop mix by Greg Poppleton.

Mixed live-to-air on radio 2SER 107.3 Sydney since 1985.

The Phantom Dancer is re-broadcast on 22 radio stations of the Community Radio Network and online at 2ser.com. That’s where you can hear lots of past Phantom Dancers, too.

IN THIS WEEK’S PHANTOM DANCER MIX?

The June Christy feature and a whole mix of swing and jazz from live 1930s-50s radio. Read the full play list below.

The last hour of the mix is ALL VINYL.

JUNE CHRISTY

was the stage name of cool jazz singer, June Christy. She was described in a 1998 New Statesman article as “one of the finest and most neglected singers of her time.”

THIRTEEN

Her professional singing career began at age 13, singing in the Decatur, Illinois based Bill Oetzel Society Orchestra at thirteen. After high school, changing her name to Sharon Leslie she sang with various bands including a group led by A-list band leader Boyd Raeburn.

FORTY-FIVE

Her big break came in 1945. She’d heard Stan Kenton was auditioning for a female singer to replace Anita O’Day. She won the audition.

Changing her name to June Christy, she sung on Kenton’s biggest selling and million selling record, his 1945 hit Tampico which we’ll hear live from ’45 on this week’s Phantom Dancer.

When Kenton broke up his band in 1948, June spent two years as a solo in nightclubs before joining the new Stan Kenton Orchestra in 1950.

FORTY-SEVEN

She had also, from 1947, started to work on her own records

She released her ‘Something Cool’ album in 1954. In the orchestra for the album was her multi-instrumentalist husband, Bob Cooper. The album was a Top 20 hit and was important in launching the vocal cool movement of the 1950s.

The New York Times quoted Christy as saying that ‘Somethng Cool’ was “the only thing I’ve recorded that I’m not unhappy with.”

She released a second edition of the album in 1955 with extra tracks.

SIXTY

Christy re-recorded ‘Something Cool’ in 1960 in stereo and with a slightly different musical line-up.

TV showcased Christy’s talents in the 1940s-50s-60s.

We’ll hear two of her TV performances on this week’s Phantom Dancer. The first is from a 1949 ‘Eddie Condon’s Floorshow’ telecast. The second is from the first sponsored jazz concert on television, The Timex All-Star Jazz Show, in 1957.

She toured Australia in the 1950s.

SEVENTY

Alcoholism reduced the number of performances she gave post-1969. Notable was her appearance with the Kenton orchestra at the 1972 Newport Jazz Festival with which she also recorded again in 1977.

EIGHTY

She continued to sing at festivals in the 1980s, making her final appearance sharing the stage with Chet Baker in 1988.

“Christy’s wholesome but particularly sensuous voice is less an improviser’s vehicle than an instrument for long, controlled lines and the shading of a fine vibrato. Her greatest moments—the heartbreaking ‘Something Cool’ itself, ‘Midnight Sun,’ ‘I Should Care’—are as close to creating definitive interpretations as any singer can come.”- The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

June Christy singing with Stan Kenton’s Orchestra in a 1945 soundie

11 SEPTEMBER PLAY LIST

Play List – The Phantom Dancer
107.3 2SER-FM Sydney, Live Stream, Digital Radio
Community Radio Network Show CRN #331

107.3 2SER Tuesday 11 September 2018
After the 2SER 12 noon news, 12:04 – 2:00pm (+10 hours GMT)
National Program:
ArtSoundFM Canberra Sunday 7 – 8pm
and early morning on 23 other stations.

Set 1
Swing Bands on 1940s Radio
Dipsy Doodle (theme) + Study in Brown
Larry Clinton Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Meadowbrook Ballroom
Cedar Grove NJ
AFRS Re-Broadcast
18 Dec 1948
Paxtonia
George Paxton Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania NY
AFRS Re-Broadcast
19 Jul 1945
Don’t Take Your Love From Me + Beautiful Love + Vieni Su (theme)
Carl Ravazza Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Blackhawk Restaurant
Chicago
AFRS Re-Broadcast
6 Aug 1944
Set 2
Glenn Miller 1940-41 Radio
Moonlight Serenade (theme) + I’m in a Sentimental Mood
Glenn Miller Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WJZ NBC Blue NY
22 Nov 1941
Limehouse Blues
Glenn Miller Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
WJZ NBC Blue NY
23 Nov 1940
I Dreamt I Dwelt in Harlem + Slumber Song (theme)
Glenn Miller Orchestra
Cafe Rouge
Hotel Pennsylvania
Dec 1940
Set 3
Bing Crosby 1933-34 Radio
Black Moonlight
Bing Crosby
Comm Rec
Los Angeles
27 Aug 1933
Love in Bloom
Bing Crosby
‘Woodbury Show’
KNX CBS LA
17 Sep 1934
Ad + The Very Thought of You
Bing Crosby
‘Woodbury Show’
KNX CBS LA
18 Sep 1934
Set 4
Latin-American Band Leaders on U.S Radio
Theme + I Concentrate on You
Chuck Cabot Orchestra
Empire Room
Rice Hotel
KTRH CBS Houston
Apr 1953
Theme + I’m Walkin’
Charlie Richards Orchestra
‘ABC Dancing Party’
Birdland
WABC ABC NY
1958
Bugle Call Rag + Close
Vincent Lopez Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Grill Room
Hotel Taft NY
AFRS Re-Broadcast
1959
Set 5
1937-38 Camel Caravan Radio
Two Buck Stew
Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
WABC CBS New York
9 Nov 1938
Satan Takes A Holiday
Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
KNX CBS LA
17 Aug 1937
If It’s The Last Thing I Do
Benny Goodman Orchestra (voc) Martha Tilton
‘Camel Caravan’
KNX CBS LA
16 Nov 1937
Sing, Sing, Sing (Part 2)
Benny Goodman Orchestra
‘Camel Caravan’
KNX CBS LA
10 Aug 1937
Set 6
ABC Radio Rock’n’Roll Dance Party
See Saw
The Moonglows with Sam ‘The Man’ Taylor Orchestra
Rock’n’Roll Dance Party
WCBS CBS NY
1957
Mr Sandman
The Chordettes with Count Basie Orchestra
Rock’n’Roll Dance Party
WCBS CBS NY
1956
Eddie, My Love
The Chordettes with Count Basie Orchestra
Rock’n’Roll Dance Party
WCBS CBS NY
1956
You Mean Everything to Me
Ivory Joe Hunter with Count Basie Orchestra
Rock’n’Roll Dance Party
WCBS CBS NY
1957
Set 7
June Christy on 1940s-50s Radio and TV
Tampico
June Christy (voc) Stan Kenton Orchestra
‘New Year Dancing Party’
AFRS Hollywood
31 Dec 1945
I Want To Be Happy
June Christy (voc) Woody Herman Orchestra
‘Timex All-Star Jazz Show’
WNBT NBC TV NY
30 Dec 1957
I Don’t Want To Be Loved
June Christy (voc) Stan Kenton Orchestra
Palladium Ballroom
KNX CBS LA
27 Nov 1945
Look At Me Now
June Christy
Eddie Condon’s Floorshow’
WNBT NBC TV NY
23 May 1949
Set 8
1960s Jazz
Chicago
Benny Goodman Quartet
WNBC NBC TV NY
21 Aug 1967
Dark Eyes + Have I Told You Lately
Gene Krupa Quartet (voc) Tony Bennet
‘Guard Session’
Radio Transcription
1963
Satin Doll + Night Train
Duke Ellington Orchestra
‘One Night Stand’
Steel Pier
Atlantic City NJ
AFRS Re-Broadcast
Jul 1964

Professional Alumni Event Sparks With 1920s Trio


The Greg Poppleton jazz deco 1920s trio were hired to entertain with real Great Gatsby music for a 1920s-themed professional gathering at Sydney’s Arthouse Hotel.

Authentic 1920s singer, world-toured guitar, banjo and sousaphone, excellent sound, and interesting people made this professional networking event spark.

“The band were fantastic. They reaĺly made the night a success.”
Anne Lyell, The Chiropractic Alumni

Greg Poppleton authentic 1920s singer and Cazzbo sousaphone

As members of the profession networked, Greg Poppleton, authentic 1920s singer accompanied by Grahame Conlon banjo and guitar, and Cazzbo Johns sousaphone, played their authentic 1920s repertoire with entertaining style and at background level.

 

Greg Poppleton 1920s singer at Chiropractic alumni event

When guests wanted to dance, we happily obliged with The Charleston, a tango or a slow foxtrot.

Sound was supplied with the band by OzManagement.

Greg Poppleton 1920s Trio

Tony Jex, at OzManagement, is the band’s booker. When you book Greg Poppleton, Tony can also supply you, at your request, sound, lights and staging in a one-stop shop A/V deal.

It saves you time and money.

And it guarantees you perfect sound and ambience every time.

Have Australia’s only authentic 1920s – 1930s singer Greg Poppleton and his band to Orchestra at your event.

We can add swing dancers, dance lessons, sound, lights and staging. Tell us your requirements in the message section of the contact page.

Greg Poppleton, authentic 1920s singer based in Sydney

Book Greg Poppleton Now

Thank you Aron Downie from Macquarie University for the photos and for permission to use them.